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Keramic Studio 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR THE 

CHINA PAINTER AND 

POTTER 



Volume Eighteen 

MAY 1916 to APRIL 1917 INCLUSIVE 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

(All Rights Reserved) 




ftERAMIC STUDIO— Index 



CONVENTIONAL 



MAY, 1916 Page 

Plate Albert W. Heckman 7 

Satsuma Bowl Kathxyn E. Cherry 7 

Little Things to Make M. A. Yeich 8 

Pitcher Marguerite Cameron 9 

Breakfast Set Eula L. McElhinny 9 

Canadian Thistle Design F. R. Weisskopf 10 

Cylindrical Vase and Panel F. R. Weisskopf 11 

Breakfast Set Dorothea Warren O'Hara 12 

A. D. Cup and Saucer Dorris Dawn Mills 13 

India Dish in Dusted Color W. K. Titze 13 

Conventional Vase Albert W. Heckman 14 

JUNE, 1916 

Peacock Placque in Enamels Henrietta B. Paist 21 

Plate, Pears Grace B. Hall 22 

Bon Bon Box Elise Tally 23 

Lemonade Pitcher, Yellow Lily Nell Sherrod 24 

Plate Kathryn E. Cherry 25 

Design for Tea Set Annie E. Frederick 26 

Round Box Mrs. Katherine Bertram 27 

After Dinner Cup and Saucer M. C. McCormick 27 

Tile, Garden Motif M. L. Brigham 28 

AUGUST, 1916 

Fruit Set Kathryn E. Cherry 46-47 

Little Things to Make M. A. Yeich 48 

Monkey Flower Motif M. A. Yeich 48 

Satsuma Box Dorothea Warren O'Hara 

Nut Bowl, Acorns May B. Hoelscher 

Salad Bowl Ethel Naubert Hamilton 

Lunch Set Albert W. Heckman 

Plate Florence McCray 

Pitcher H. L. Bridwell 



Page 

... 87 
... 87 



49 
49 
50 

51 
52 

53 

Bon Bon Dishes, Nasturtiums Nell Sherrod 54 

Design Units for Dinner Sets Kathryn E. Cherry 54 

Dinner Set, Orange Blossom Motif W. K. Titze 55 

Hard China Tea Caddy Katherine L. Perkins 56 

Covered Box Margaret Cameron 56 

Water Pitcher Katherine L. Perkins 56 

Vase, Rhododendron Motif Nellie G. Leyman 57 

Cup and Saucer Elise W. Tally 58 

Pitcher Mary L. Brigham 59 

Tea Tile, Wild Geese Lena E. Hanscom 60 

SEPTEMBER, 1916 

Plate ElmaS. Ritter 

Dresser Set Albert W. Heckman.. 

Little Things to make M. A. Yeich 

Satsuma Vase, Enamels Elise W. Tally.. 



62 

63 

64 

65 

Tea Set, Bird Design Dorothea Warren O'Hara 66-67 

Service Plate Mrs. F. H. Hannemann 68 

Sugar and Creamer, Rose Panels Kathryn E. Cherry 69 

One Fire Design for Luncheon Set Leah H. Rodman 70 

Service Plate, Rose Panels Kathryn E. Cherry 71 

Berry Bowl, Blackberry Blossom Sara E. King 71 

Conventional Motifs F. R. Weisskopf 73 

Tile, Orchids Laura B. Overly 74 

Enamel Design for Bowl Ida N. Cochran Nat. Sec. 40 

OCTOBER, 1916 

Honey Jar and Plate Sara E. King 76 

Belleek Bowl in Enamels Elise W. Tally 77 

Dresser Set Kathryn E. Cherry 78-79 

Design for Plate Jessie Hurd Black 79 

Milk Mug and Plate Albert W. Heckman 80 

Satsuma Bowl in Enamels Ethel N. Hamilton 81 

Dinner Set, Cup and Saucer : Lillian Miller 81-84-85 

Soap Weed for Round Box Essie Foley 82 

Soap Weed for Vase Essie Foley 83 

Satsuma Box in Enamels Ida N. Cochran 86 

Design for Bowl Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt 86 

Suggestions for Conventional Clover 

Motif Lena Hanscom S7 



Straight Border Jessie Hurcl Black 

Border Dorris Dawn Mills 

NOVEMBER, 1916 

Bon Bon Boxes A. W. Heckman 90 

Belleek Bowl Elise W. Tally 91 

Small Things to make in Enamels F. R. Weisskopf 92 

Witch Hazel in Summer M. A. Yeich 93 

Witch Hazel in Autumn M. A. Yeich 94 

Witch Hazel Motifs M. A. Yeich 95 

Border, Flower Clusters Lola A. St. John 96 

Vases Stella Gray Whitman 96 

Bureau Tray Stella Gray Whitman 97 

Border and Card Plate Stella Gray Whitman 98 

Pine Tray and Blue Vase Stella Gray Whitman 99 

Chocolate Cup and Saucer M. C. McCormick 99 

Vase H. L. Bridwell 100 

Satsuma Vase in Enamels Ethel N. Hamilton 100 

Lemonade Set Hattie Schumann 101 

Conventional Bowl Albert W. Heckman 102 

Sedji Flower Pot and Saucer Marguerite Cameron 103 

Satsuma Box Dante C. Babbitt 104 

Salt Shaker Leah H. Rodman 104 

DECEMBER, 1916 

Enameled Belleek Vase Kathryn E. Cherry 107 

Enamels for Units Henrietta B. Paist 109 

Belleek Bowl Elise W. Tally no 

Chocolate Pot and Cup Albert W. Heckman 112 

What can be done with the Supplement 

Design Mrs. A. A. Robineau 113 

Porridge Set Dorothea Warren O'Hara 114 

Tea Set Maud M. Mason 115 

Breakfast Set M. A. Youngjohn 118 

Vase K. E. Cherry 119 

Child's Set Mary L. Brigham 121- 

American Indian (Shoshone) Motif Esther A. Coster 128 

JANUARY, 1917 

Bonbonniere in Enamels Henrietta B. Paist 131 

Satsuma Jar Mary L. Brigham 132 

Narcissus Bowl Isabelle C. Kissinger 135 

Small Bowl Design Anne Taylor Brown 135 

Plate Designs Maud M. Mason 137 

Japanese Lantern Flower F. R. Weisskopf 138 

What can be done with the Supplement 

Design Mrs. A. A. Robineau 139 

Dresser Set Albert W. Heckman 140 

Bowl in Enamels Dorothea Warren O'Hara 142 

Various Steps in Motif Development.. .Mrs. Vernie L. Williams 144-145 

Border Ruth M. Ruck, 145 

Tiles M. Louise Arnold 145 

Satsuma Box Elise Tally 151 

Medallions and Borders Esther A. Coster 152 

FEBRUARY, 1917 

Enameled Sedji Set Kathryn E. Cherry 155 

Bonbonniere Henrietta B. Paist 156 

Bowl Mary F. Overbeck 157 

Plate, Grape and Leaf Motif Maud M. Mason 15S 

Persian Tiles in South Kensington 

Museum, London 159 

Problem for Decoration Flower Compo- 
sition '. Mrs. Vernie L.Williams 160-161 

Adaptations of the Color Supplement.. Mrs. A. A. Robineau 162 

Grape Juice Set Dorothea Warren O'Hara 163 

Olive and Mint Trays F. B. Herrington 166 

Mush Bowl, Individual Salt Cellar and 

Plate Albert W. Heckman 167 

Dinner Set Lillian Miller 168-169 

Conventional Panels F. R. Weisskopf 171 

Plate Border Mary L. Brigham 174 

Tile, Cowslip Mrs. Katherine Bertram 174 



HXRAMIC STUDIO- Index 

CONVENTIONAL— Continued 



MARCH, 1917 Page 

Adaptation of the Color Supplement... .Mrs. A. A. Robineau 177-193 

Vase in Golds and Lustres Kathryn E. Cherry 179 

Plate, Bird Motif Maud M. Mason 182-183 

French China Plate Dorothea Warren O'Hara 184 

Jardiniere Elise W. Tally 185 

Designs for Tea Set Mrs. H. B. Paist 186 

Tea Set Mrs. Vernie L. Williams 192 

Borders for Etched Glass or China Vanda U. Newitt 196 

Borders to be carried out in gold Mrs. F. H. Hannemann 196 

APRIL, 1917 
Satsuma Vase, Flower Garden Design.. Dorothea Warren O'Hara 200 



Adaptation of the Color Supplement Mrs. A. A. Robineau 201 

Medallions with treatment for Enamels. Kathryn E. Cherry 202 

Marmalade Jar, Grape Design Henrietta Barclay Paist 203 

Bathroom Tiles, Wave and Mexican 

Motifs Esther A. Coster 204 

Lamp Vase Maud M. Mason 205-207 

Window Box Design Mrs. Vernie L. Williams... 208-209-215 

Cup and Saucer Tillie Peterson 211 

Marmalade Jar Henrietta Barclay Paist 214 

Window Box Design Mrs. Vernie L. Williams 215 

Bowl M. JanieLauilt 217 



NATURALISTIC AND DECORATIVE 



MAY, 1916 Page 

Nat. Sec. 

Rose Plate Adeline More 1 

Vase Adeline More 2 

Chanticleer Plate Adeline More ., 3 

Plate Borders Minnie G. Myers 4 

Pitcher, Currants Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 5 

Wild Rose Vase Dorris Dawn Mills 6 

Box, Hawthorn Kathryn E. Cherry 6 

Plant Analysis M. H. Watkeys 7 

Plant Analysis...' Florence Wyman Whitson 8 

Box, Forget-me-Nots Kathryn E. Cherry 8 

JUNE, 1916 

Semi-Conventional Plate, Roses Kathryn E. Cherry 9 

.Vases, Birds and Yellow Daisies Adeline More 10-11 

Borders W. K. Titze 12 

Bowl in Elderberries Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 12 

Flower Drawing, Butter and Eggs Marion L. Fosdick 13-15 

Plant Analysis Florence Wyman Whitson 16 

JULY, 1916 

Shell Plate Adeline More 17 

Cup and Saucer, Asters Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 18 

Tea Pot, Rose Design Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 18 

Small Plate, Salts and Peppers Dorris Dawn Mills 19 

Plate in Yellow Roses... Ida N. Cochran 20 

Bowl, Violets Dorris Dawn Mills 20 

Plate Kathryn E. Cherry 21 

Rose Plate Adeline More 22 

Bowl or Plate Design W. K. Titze 23 

AUGUST, 1916 

Salad or Fruit Set Kathryn E. Cherry 25 

Flower Design Alice W. Donaldson 26 

Blue Poppy Vase Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 27 

Plate, Orange Blossoms Marie Witwer 28 

Cup, Saucer and Bowl, Orange Blos- 
soms Marie Witwer 29 

Nasturtium Marion L. Fosdick 30 

Wild Morning Glory M. H. Watkeys 31 

Satsuma Box Kathryn E. Cherry 32 

SEPTEMBER, 1916 

Rose Borders and Panels M. G. Myers 33 

Game Plate Adeline More 34 

Six Plate Designs Adeline More 35 

Lady Slipper Margaret H. Watkeys 36 

Bowl, Blackberries Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 37 

Poppies Mary L. Berry 38 

Butterfly Weed M. A. Yeich 39 

Prairie on Fire Florence W3^man Whitson 40 

OCTOBER, 1916 

Fishplate Adeline More 41 

Sugar Bowl, Cup and Spoon Tray in 

Forget-me-nots Albert W. Heekman 42 

Panel and Circular Designs Mrs. J. K. Heismann 43 

Plate Mrs. F. H. Hannemann 44 



Nat. Sec. 

Two Plate Designs Kathryn E. Cherry 45 

Candlesticks Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 45 

Snake Grass Kate Clark Greene 46 

Plate, Rose Border Adeline More 47 

Wild Flower and Plant Analysis Florence W. Whitson 48 

NOVEMBER, 1916 

Game Plate, Snipe Adeline More 49 

Stein, Pine Cone W. K. Titze 

Cup and Saucer, Roses Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

Pine Cone Motifs W. K. Titze 

Cooky Tray in Daisies Mrs.'F. H. Hannemann.. 

Phlox Eleanor R. Copeland.. 



50 

51 

51 

52 

53 

Sugar and Creamer Dorris Dawn Mills 54 

Yellow Rose Plate Lillian L. Priebe 54 

Vase in Pink Rambler Mrs. F. C. McGaughy .55 

Plant Analysis Florence Wyman Whitson 56 

DECEMBER, 1916 Page 

Tea Set Walter K. Titze 122 

Salts arid Peppers, Sugar and Creamer..Mrs. M. C. McGaughy 123 

Berry Set Jeanne M. Stewart 124 

Candlestick and Powder Box, Salt and 

Pepper and Butter Tub May E. Reynolds 125 

Bowl, Rose Panels Adeline More 126 

Plate Borders Ida N. Cochran 127 

JANUARY, 1917 

Japanese Lantern Flower Florence R. Weisskopf 138 

Sugar and Creamer, Wild Rose Lillian L. Priebe 147 

Bowl in Roses Jeanne M. Stewart 148 

Breakfast Set ...Walter K. Titze 149 

Plate and Borders, Asters May E. Reynolds 150 

Service, Asters and Pink Roses May E. Reynolds 150 

FEBRUARY, 1917 

Lemonade Pitcher Dorris Dawn Mills 165 

Fruit Plate, Black Raspberries Jeanne M. Stewart 170 

Marmalade Jar, Raspberries May E. Reynolds 172 

Service Plate, Gold Design May E. Reynolds 172 

Plate and Bowl Design Walter K. Titze 173 

Small Motifs Walter K. Titze 173 

MARCH, 1917 

Vase May E. Reynolds 187 

Vase, Rose Breasted Grosbeaks May E. Reynolds 188 

Vase, Bluebirds May E. Reynolds 189 

Baskets Walter K. Titze 193 

Tray Jeanne M. Stewart 195 

APRIL, 1917 

Jardiniere W. K. Titze 212 

Fruit Bowl (3 sizes) Adeline More 212-213-214 

Comport, Grapes May E. Reynolds 215 

Corsican Pine M. Janie Launt 216-217 

Sandwich Tray Lola St. John 218 



KERAMIC STUDIO-Z/zcte* 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MAY, 1916 Page 

Duquesne Ceramic Club 2-6 

Monograms F. Herrington 6 

Books Worth Reading Anita Gray Chandler 14 

JUNE, 1916 

Books Worth Reading Anita Gray Chandler 16 

Kansas City Ceramic Club Exhibition.. 16-20 

JULY, 1916 

Exhibition of the Keramic Society of 

Greater New York Hazel H. Adler 29-44 

Table Decoration Jetta Ehlers 40-42-44 

Books Worth Reading Anita Gray Chandler Nat. Sec. 24 

AUGUST, 1916 

Beginners' Corner Mrs. G. L. Schultz 45-57 

Helpful Hints :.Sadie E. Allen 57 

Books Worth Reading Anita Gray Chandler 59 

SEPTEMBER, 1916 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 61-62 

Books Worth Reading Anita Gray Chandler 72 



NOVEMBER, 1916 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 

A Suggestion Mrs. H. A. Lillibridge... 

DECEMBER, 1916 



103 
103 



At the Sign of the Brush and Palette.. .Anita Gray Chandler 106-128 

To Keramic Studio Students Mrs. H. B. Paist 108-109 

Glass Decorating Laura Holtz O'Neill Ill 

Various Steps in Motif Development Mrs. Vernie L.Williams 117 

Lesson in Dry Dusting Jessie M. Bard 118 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 120 



JANUARY, 1917 p age 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette.. .Anita Gray Chandler 130 

Hints about Color Mrs. H. B. Paist 131 

The Chicago Art Association 133-135 

For our Inspiration Maud M. Mason 136 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 140 

Glass Firing, concluded Laura Holtz O'Neill 141-142 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara Adelaide Alsop Robineau 143 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 146 

FEBRUARY, 1917 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 154 

An Open Letter Henrietta B. Paist 156 

Maud M. Mason Adelaide Alsop Robineau 160 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 164-165 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 166 

A Suggestion Mrs. Bertha C. Cline 167 

MARCH, 1917 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 176 

Group by Kathryn E. Cherry 178 

Mrs. K. E. Cherry, a biographical 

Sketch by The Editor 178 

Work of Mrs. Cherry's Minneapolis 

Class 180-181 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 190-191 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 194 

A few suggestions for a Beginner Dora Kast 194 

APRIL, 1917 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette Anita Gray Chandler 198 

Exhibit by Mrs. Vernie L. Williams 199 

The Book Shelf 202 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams A biographical sketch by the 

Editor 209 

The Linen Page Jetta Ehlers 210 

Beginners' Corner Jessie M. Bard 211 



COLOR SUPPLEMENTS 



Treatment on page 
Nat. Sec. 

Plate Katherine L. Perkins May, 1916 8 

Daisies and Buttercups Edna S. Cave May, 1916 8 

Cockatoo Vase Katherine L. Perkins June, 1916 16 

Flower Garden Bowl Dorothea Warren O'Hara June, 1916 16 

Tile, Cup and Saucer W. K. Titze July, 1916 24 

Dorothy Perkins Rose M. G. Myers July, 1916 24 

Nasturtiums M. H. Watkeys August, 1916 32 

Plate, Cup and Saucer Mabel Emry August, 1916 32 

Vase Mary F. Overbeck September, 1916 40 

Bouillon Cup, Saucer, Plate and 

Shaker Albert W. Heckman September, 1916 40 



Treatment on page 
Nat. Sec. 

Gladioli Jane P. Baker October, 1916 48 

Forsythia H. Fewsmith October, 1916 48 

White Pond Lilies Rhoda Holmes Nicholls. November, 1916 56 

Scarlet Sage M. H. Watkeys November, 1916 56 

Page 

Conventional Designs Florence Milton McCarthy... Dec, 1916 126 

Japanese Lantern Flower F. R. Weisskopf January, 1917 138 

Plate, Grape and Leaf Motif Maud M. Mason February, 1917 158 

Bird Vases May E. Reynolds March, 1917 189 

A Venetian Garden from My 

Lady's Balcony Dorothea Warren O'Hara April, 1917 200 






1r. /9r; a 




Theentirecontentsof this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MAY, 1916 



Editorial 

Duquesne Ceramic Club 

Monograms 

Plate 

Satsuma Bowl 

Little Things to make, Conventionalizations of Apidistra 

Pitcher 

Breakfast Set 

Designs for Canadian Thistle 

Breakfast Set 

After Dinner Cup and Saucer 

Indian Dish in Dusted Color 

Conventional Vase 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Answers to Correspondents 



F. Herrington 
Albert W. Heckman 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
M. A. Yeich 
Marguerite Cameron 
Eula L. McElhinny 
F. R. Weiskopf 
Dorothea Warren O'Hara 
Dorris Dawn Mills 
W. K. Titze 
Albert W. Heckman 
Anita Gray Chandler 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Rose Plate 

Vase 

Chanticleer Plate 

Plate Borders 

Pitcher, Currant Decorations 

Wild Rose Vase 

Box, Hawthorne 

Plant Analysis 

Plant Analysis 

Box, Forget-me-nots 

Plate (Color Study) 

Daisies and Buttercups (Color Study) 



Adeline More 
Adeline More 
Adeline More 
Minnie G. Myers 
Mrs. F. C McGaughy 
Dorris Dawn Mills 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
M. H. Watkeys 
Florence Wyman Whitson 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Katherine Lindsey Perkins 
Edna S. Cave 



Page 

1 

2—6 

6 

7 

7 

8 

9 

9 

1(M1 

12 

13 

13 

14 

14 

14 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
6 
7 
8 
8 
8 



<6~ 



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S> 



KERAM1C STUDIO 




MAY 191G 
KERAM IC STUDIO 



DAISIES AND BUTTERCUPS edna s. cave 

See Naturalistic Section, page 16, 'or treatment 



sis 
KSRAMIC STUDIO PUS CO 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— KATH ERI N E LINDSAY PERKINS 
See Naturalistic Section, page 16, for treatment 



MAY 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB CO. 



Vol. XVIII, No. J. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



May 1916 




E have no "Beginners' Corner" in this 
issue, not from lack of material, but 
on account of lack of space. Our 
competition has brought us a number 
of contributions, and we have just 
given four first prizes, five second - 
prizes and six third prizes. These 
will be published in the coming issues. 

H H 

We have had so many interesting 
letters in answer to V. P. S. besides the two answers published 
last month, that we have been unable to decide upon the best, 
so we are going to leave it to our readers to decide. We will 
give these letters as rapidly as possible, and with them an- 
nounce a date for votes from our readers, and will announce 
the prizes in the following issue. 

The letter from V. P. S. "in the February Keramic opens up a subject 
which I believe is of more than usual interest to all decorators. Perhaps no 
two artists will see the subject in the same light. Truth is very much like a 
diamond, each facet cut in similar geometric shape, yet the arrangement of 
I Ik 1 facets and their individual color brings a distinct and cherished beauty, 
so the owner of a beautiful gem may certainly be pardoned for considering it 
the finest. The owner and perhaps the cutter of the gem alone know and 
appreciate the full beauty. Art to me is synonymous with beauty, and the 
more beauty we see the better artists we are, nor do we expect all to see and do 
the same work. Natural tendencies and environment preclude such a pos- 
sibility. 

Dow defines "art" as "appreciation combined with power to express". 
To me to work without appreciation is slavery, and to appreciate and not 
express is selfishness in the extreme, and to be an artist is to apppreciate and 
express one's best self, which results in a combination of emotions that no one 
but a true artist can experience. I say combination, for art is at one and the 
same time the most fascinating and the happiest, as well as the most unsatis- 
fying, of all endeavors. The vista enlarges so rapidly, the obstacles are so 
great, the seeming appreciation of others, on which finances rest, is so slow. 
The great artists, like the great musicians, must also have divine determi- 
nution. 

With these thoughts in mind does it really matter if china is painted 
conventional or naturalistic. The real problem is to make it a thing of real 
beauty. To do conventional the designer must often go to nature for inspira- 
tion, and a naturalistic painter will certainly benefit by studying the elemen- 
tary principles of space filling, balance, proportion, symmetry, repetition, con- 
tinuity, and if we are to make ceramic decoration a real art we must do more 
than argue naturalistic vs. conventional. 

Art is beauty, not dogma, and we need both realism and idealism to 
appreciate and express the beauty of nature and to understand and express 
the symbolism of design and color symphony; not mysticism, no, but just 
a plain appreciation of the beautiful and the reasons why. Then we will see 
more in nature and take greater care to reproduce what we see in its wonderful 
beauty and in the infinite realm of abstract design we will see new beauties 
that will firing decorative appreciation to a higher and a more popular plane. 

The decorator who paints only naturalistic loses much of practical as 
well as broader vision and inspiration. Conventional work will even help to 
an appreciation of the beauties of nature and will give a definite training that 
is much needed to raise the student of naturalistic work. Conventional work- 
ers may well modify their work to include naturalistic ideas and forms, and 
inspiration. 

The Japanese live their art in every day life, which is what, we should 
learn to do in America. V. G. COOVER. 

Ten Or twelve years ago (lie letter written by "V. P. S." would have been 
"my sentiments too". 1 was a subscriber io Kcrninic Studio when i( first 
began to show the conventional designs. I could see nothing beautiful, let. 
alone anything the least bit artistic in them, and when the magazine became 
more and more conventional, I was first heart-sick about it, then finally just 
got good and "sore." 



At that time one of Lcykauf's most promising pupils, also a teacher, 
accepted my invitation to come West, live with me without expense to her, 
in exchange for my lessons, she to make what she could from teaching and 
selling to others. Naturally, I absorbed her ideas of art while learning her 
way of painting; yet here and there in my work would creep in some little 
"conventional" or, more likely, "semi-conventional" style of work, and she 
used to say to me, "I believe you would do good conventional work." At the 
same time we both cultivated a "sneering" attitude towards the conventional 
work as shown in Kt ramie. Studio. All we could know or sec of it was limited 
to what was illustrated in the Studio. Finally, when my year's subscription 
expired, I wrote the editor of Keramic Studio a letter that I, in my ignorance, 
thought would have great weight, in the controversy going on for and against 
the conventional designs. The editor, no doubt, will remember one partic- 
ularly brilliant (?) passage where I said, "I am like the old woman that said 
(in regard to something or other, I don't know what now) T wouldn't if I 
could and I couldn't if I would,' " referring to the using of the conventional 
designs in the Studio. She answered me, as I deserved, that "Keramic Studio 
had existed before I became a subscriber and no doubt could exist without my 
subscription." 

To sum the matter up, I am again a. subscriber, have moved to a larger 
city, have traveled considerably since that time, am painting most of the year 
round and do conventional work almost exclusively. To be fair to myself 
though and to Nature whom I love in all her moods, I must honestly say I think 
the naturalistic is the I rue art. I think the conventional or the semi-conven- 
tional is more appropriate and in much better taste for table use; but when one 
wants a truly artist i ■.. piece of work that is to be purely ornamental, then we 
must copy natuf j with her infinite numbers of colors, lights and shadows, 
though I would not give the impression that a finely executed piece of con- 
ventional work on vase, jardiniere or box cannot be just as ornamental, but 
that the naturalistic style of work should be confined to pieces intended only 
as an ornament. 

One tiling the naturalistic artist cannot understand is why the artists who 
do both conventional and naturalistic work, and both equally well, almost 
without, exception prefer to do the conventional work, notwithstanding the 
fact that the naturalistic is much to be preferred from a financial standpoint. 
Most any artist can do three naturalistic plates while she would do one in 
conventional that looked to have the same amount of work; but in most com- 
munities she cannot get any higher price for a conventional piece than she 
would for a realistic, even though it would take her three or four times as long 
to do the conventional. 

I wonder if "V. P. S." visited the Panama Pacific Exposition. It seems 
to me that any one, no matter how prejudiced they were against the conven- 
tional style of work, would have become converted after seeing the wonderfully 
beautiful and equally artistic display of conventional work there. I may also 
add for the benefit of those who were not fortunate enough to visit the Expo- 
sition that the naturalistic work was conspicuous by its absence. F. L. H. 



In answer to the letter of V. P. S., it seems as if it almost savors of "all the 
world is queer save thee and me, and thee is just a little queer," for even the 
bouquet that is thrown at Mrs. Paist is uncertain. But setting aside the non- 
compliment to the rest of the world of china painters, let us look at art without 
design — how far could we go? Let us look at design without a love for nature 
— how can they be separated? From where but nature do we get the beautiful 
forms and colors? If we saw only "distortion" in conventional work, what 
would we do for decoration and architecture. Would even our rugs, our tiles, 
our wall dec-orations, be half as lovely if those that designed them were not, 
lovers of nature? Nature itself is grand, but it loses its grandest reality when 
painted, that which holds us goes. The odor, the life, the grandeur of nature, 
can never be reproduced on anything, it must lose. But the beautiful forms, 
the color, the suggestions are man's to form, to mould, to blend with his own 
natural taste and make ornament and design. So how could one study and 
love art and not love forms and curves with all the beauties they give, when even 
the human form is symmetrical. One might like posies on china, better than 
conventional work, I hat is a matter of taste. But I cannot see how design in 
<dl its forma can be "disturbing" and "irritating" to a true artist. One's taste 
can develop and grow in whatever channel one allows to be opened up, or be 
stunted in one that is closed; and very often one is greatly surprised at the un- 
covering of a long petted like or dislike. SADIE E. ALLAN. 



■:.>. 




MAY ) 






KERAMIC STUDIO 



I am well aware that it ill becomes a beginner in ceramics to attempt to 
answer V. P. S.'s letter in the February Studio on the subject of natural vs. 
conventional decoration of china, and I have no doubt that everything has 
been said on both sides of the question long before I became interested in it. 

V. P. S. states that she cannot see beauty in the "distorted, conventional 
shapes," and she reveals in that statement the fact that she is not an inventor 
or discoverer in the field of art. 

The conventional in art is only for the imaginative seeker after new 
things, the adventurer along the way who is eager to see what he can find just 
around the corner. 

The student of natural forms, while he has a world of color and line, etc., 
etc., before him, goes no farther than what he sees — nor cares to go farther. 
For him there is nothing new, no surprise, no discovery, no sudden coming 
upon an idea that is the joy of the worker in conventional design. 

For the student of natural forms, the first rose she ever saw on its natural 
stem grows just the same on a bush or a tea-pot, or a vase, and in all manner of 
places where nature never intended a rose to grow at all, and the rose her- 
neighbor paints is just the same as hers, varying only in her skill to copy the 
thing as it grows. 

I maintain that there is not an atom of originality in all natural work 
from the painting of a forget-me-not to a Dutch wind-mill. 

Now in conventional work, the flower motif may be manipulated, and 
coaxed, and shaped into fascinating patterns and borders and bands, limited 
in number and effectiveness and power of expression only by the artist's clever 
originality and the fertility of his imagination. 

With all sincere apologies to V. P. S., it always seemed to me that an in- 
clination toward conventional forms in the decoration of all articles of use be- 
speaks a fine discriminating good taste. Let the reproduction of nature, as it 
is, be framed and hung upon the wall as a reproduction, but our walls, our 
draperies, our pillow covers, and above all, our china demand the fine restraint 
of conventional forms in decoration. 

LETHIA F WRIGHT. 



DESIGN CONTEST 

We call the attention of designers to the following contest 
in designs under the auspices of the Kyoto Commercial Museum, 
Kyoto, Japan: 

Exhibits.— Designers of all kinds of art crafts may exhibit 
the designs and the actual goods when the designer is the art 
craftsman. 

Subject. — The design must contain two flowers or more 
among the five undermentioned, but may add a subordinate 
motif, if necessary: 1, Pansy; 2, Sweet-pea; 3, Maiden-hair 
fern (Adiantum); 4, Tulip; 5, Thistle. 

Paper and Size.— There is no limitation as to the kind of 
paper or the size of the sheet. 

Prizes.— The Museum offers one Grand Prix Medal, two 
Gold Medals, three Silver Medals, seven copper Medals, and 
some Diplomas. 

Exhibition. — The exhibition will be held in the Kyoto 
Commercial Museum in October, 1916. 

Designs. — Designs winning prizes will not be returned, 
others shall be returned when return postage is paid. 

Publication. — The best designs among the exhibits will 
be published in a book. 

Closing of offer.— Designers must report their names, ad- 
dress and the number of the designs they offer to the Museum 
before September 20th, 1916. 

Please apply to the Director of the Kyoto Commercial 
Museum for further particulars. 




MRS. V. LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 
DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. MARY C. WALTERS 



DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB 

THE Duquesne Ceramic Club, whose membership embraces 
many cities and towns of Western Pennsylvania, has for 
several years past made a remarkable growth. 

Better than ever before was the exhibition, the twenty- 
third, which opened in the Carnegie Galleries. This Club 
has been steadily gaining during the past few years, until its 
work is worthy to compete with similar work anywhere. 

Prof. Herbert Kniffin of the University of Pittsburgh has 
directed the class in design for three years. The class has met 
for instruction every second week for ten years. 

Among the beauties of the collection is a rectangular vase 
by Mrs. V. Lockwood Williams, which received first mention 
for excellence of technique. The design is a conventionalized 
dandelion leaf and flower in dull golds and greens with a touch 
of scarlet. A very striking plate in dull red, gold, blue and 
green, by Miss Anne Mclntyre, received second mention in 
technique, and Miss Mclntyre also carried off second honors 
for coloring, with a bowl in cream, dark blue and green. A 
lovely little teapot in yellow luster, by Mrs. Ray E. Motz, 
received third mention in technique. 

A graceful vase on which the dragon fly is skillfully con- 
ventionalized in salmon and indeterminate shades of blue and 
green, on a ground of creamy white, done by Albert J. Rott, 



took first honors in color. Mrs. L. Stephenson Price, with a 
large vase in rich dark browns and greens, with tan and cream, 
received third mention for coloring. 

Awards for excellence in design went to Miss Maud Chapin, 
who received first mention for a jardiniere in blue and cream 
and brown; Miss Mary C. Walters, second mention, for an 
Egyptian bowl, and Miss Ella Faber, third, for a tea set, whose 
blue and gold bands follow the lines of the china. 

A salad set in pale green, blue and buff, by Mrs. Anna 
Mclntyre, deserves mention also, as does also the rose jar in 
salmon and green by Miss Edith Silliman; a large plate by Miss 
Sadie Kier; a vase in grey greens by Mrs. Kolgel; a Satsuma 
jar in green and lavender by Miss Nettie Breitweiser; a vase 
and bon-bon, by Miss Nettie Davis; a luncheon set in reds and 
greens, by Miss Jeannette Negley; a bowl in gold and white, 
by Miss Alice McQuaide of Greensburg, and a Satsuma bowl, 
by Miss Leda Harrison of Springdale. A bowl in reds and 
greens, by Mrs. D. Horton Lutz of Clairton, and a jardiniere 
by Mrs. Byron Mitchell both mentioned for good coloring. 

The judges were: J. Valentine Kirby, head of the art 
department of the Pittsburgh schools; Vincent P. Sollom of 
the School of applied design in the Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, and Miss Merrill of the Margaret Morrison Carnegie 
School. Miss Myra Boyd is president of the club. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ELLA FABER 




MR. ALBERT J. ROTT 
DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. Davis Mrs. Motz Mrs. Mitchei Mrs. Price Mr. Rott Miss Breitweiser Miss McQuade Miss Kier 

Mrs. Silliman Miss Chapin Mrs. Price Mrs. Price Mrs. Koecle Miss Harrison 

Mrs. Lute Miss Faber Mrs. Negley 




MRS. RAY E. MOTZ. 
DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. ANNA McINTYRE AND MISS ANNE McINTYRE 
DUQUESNE CERAMIC CLUB EXHIBIT 




All 





>f.<r* 



MONOGRAMS— F. HERRINGTON 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



A FTER having placed the important lines of the design on 
■**- the piece of china to be painted with India ink, tint the 
lighter parts of the design a delicate cream color and darker 
parts of the background a light £reen. Let the paint dry 



well or bake in a hot oven and then paint in the flower forms 
and stems of the flowers in two parts Banding Blue and one 
part Deep Blue Green. For all the other parts of the design 
use a light Warm Green. 




SATSUMA BOWL— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



OUTLINE design with Black. The outside of roses is 
Warmest Pink Enamel. The light tone next to it is 
Jasmine, the next circle and the small circle in the background 
and inside of bowl are Wistaria. The centers of the roses and 
of the small circles are Pompeian Red. The small centers in 
buds are 1 part Warmest Pink, 1 part Wistaria. Stems, small 
leaves, remainder of buds and lower part of jar are Florentine 



No. 1. The remainder of design is Gold. If this is carried 
out on Satsuma the gold may be put on for the first fire as it 
does not over fire so easily but if Belleek is used, enough fire hot 
to glaze the enamels the first time and then apply gold for 
second fire and fire for the Gold and the enamels will retain 
the glaze. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

ST* 




LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE, CONVENTIONALIZATION OF APIDISTRA— M. A. YEICH 

APIDISTRA, the familiar house plant with its unfamil- the [skunk cabbage, turning brown with age. Paint the 
iar bloom has furnished the theme for these designs, lines black or dark green and the black parts of the design 
The flower, when first open, is of about the same coloring as with gold. For the leaves and the remainder of the design, 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



use several tones of grey green. Tint the ground with Ivory. 
The flowers may be developed in their natural colors also. 
For the darker parts use a wash of Ruby or Pompadour Red 
and for the lighter parts use two tones of Grey Green or Meis- 
sen Brown. The two medallions on the right, the border, 
the lower part of the rectangular box, and the saucer are de- 
signed from the bud, which is Grey Green. The border may 
be done in Gold bands and lines or in several tones of green. 

PITCHER 

Marguerite Cameron 

ONE fire^Paint all lines Black Enamel. Stems, leaves 
and centers of flowers Deep Blue Green Enamel. Flow- 
ers Turquoise Enamel. 

INDIAN DESIGN IN DUSTED COLOR (Page 13) 

W. K. Titze 
13LACK portions Black, light tint in Yellow Brown, dark 
•*-* tint in Blood Red. First dust Yellow Brown and fire, 
then dust the red flowers and paint on the Black and fire 
again. 





BREAKFAST SET— EULA L. McELHINNY 



'T V HE outline may be omitted but if preferred use Black. 

■*- Oil the leaves, stems, the upper and two lower bands 

and dust with Florentine Green. Oil large petals of flowers, 

the two bands between the sections and the triangle in the 



stem and dust with Grey Blue. Oil the 3 small spaces in 
flower and dust with Mode and the center with 3 parts Albert 
Yellow and 2 parts Pearl Grey. 



10 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGNS OF CANADIAN THISTLE— F. R. WEISSKOPF 



PLATE 

OUTLINE, bands and stems are Gold. Oil leaves and dust 
with 1 part Water Lily Green and 1 part Pearl Grey. 
Oil outer circle of flower and dust with 2 parts Mode, 1 Water 
Blue, 2 Ivory Glaze. Oil the next space and dust with Mode 
and the calyx with 2 parts Cameo and 1 part Mode. Border, 
stems and dark top of thistle are Gold. Lower part of thistle 
is Coffee Brown dusted on. Light figures around it are equal 
parts of Deep Ivory and Yellow for Dusting. Background 1 
Pearl Grey, 1 Florentine Green. Wide band at top and bottom 
is 1 Pearl Grey, \ Dark Grey. Light background is Pearl 
Grey and a little Apple Green. 

MOTIF TO THE LEFT 

Stems and dark spaces Gold. Buds and blossom Violet 



and a little Banding Blue painted on, design around the edge 
is Apple Green, a little Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue. 

BORDER 

Top of thistles, outer line and the lines at the top and bot- 
tom of center are dusted with Mode. All of the darkest 
tones are equal parts Water Lily Green and Dark Grey. On 
square spaces at the centers are Yellow Red and Yellow Brown 
and the tint around them Yellow for Dusting. Background 
is Pearl Grey and a little Yellow. 

MOTIF TO THE RIGHT 

All dark part of design is Gold. Blossoms are oiled and 
dusted with Grey Blue. If background is needed use Pearl 
Grey and a little Yellow Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



n 




Second Fire — Oil background back of design and dust 
with 1 Pearl Grey, 1 Glaze for Green, 1 Ivory Glaze. Oil 
remainder of background and dust with Pearl Grey, a little 
Dark Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 




CYLINDRICAL VASE, CANADIAN THISTLE 

F. R. Weisskopf 
/"\IL darkest stems, dark part of leaves and bands and dust 
V-J with Water Green No. 2. Oil light leaves and stems 
and dust with 1 part Pearl Grey, 1 Water Green. Oil dark 
part of flowers and dust with 1 part Bright Green, 1 part Flor- 
entine. Oil the next lighter tone and dust .with Grey Blue 
and the lightest tone with Glaze for Blue. The wide band at 
the top and bottom is 3 parts Pearl Grey, 1 Dark Grey, 1 
Bright Green. 



PANEL, CANADIAN THISTLE 

F. R. Weisskopf 
-T^HE top of blossoms is Violet and a little Ruby added for 
J- thestronger touches. Light part of leaves and stems 
are BrowmGreen and a little Albert Yellow with a little Copen- 
hagen Blue added for the light under part of leaves. Darker 
leaves and stems are Apple Green, Brown Green and Copen- 
hagen Blue. 

SHOP NOTE 

A prominent New York manufacturer has recently brought 
out some very attractive palette boxes for china painters, 
which instead of the conventional black, are made in soft tints 
of Pink, Blue, Yellow, Brown and the more vivid colors of 
Orange, Marine Blue and Persian Green. 



12 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



CUP AND SAUCER (Page 13) 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

OMIT the outline. Oil leaves and all dark tones and dust 
with 3 parts Florentine Green, 1 part Pearl Grey. Oil 
flower form, the seven spaces under the leaf and dust with 
Deep Ivory. Oil the grey space above leaf and grey band on 
corner and dust with 4 parts Pearl Grey, 1 Dark Grey and a 
pinch of Albert Yellow. 

•f "f 

STUDIO NOTES 

Miss Fannie M. Scammell has returned from California 
and will teach with Mrs. Vance Phillips at Chautauqua this 
season, from July 10 to August 18. 



Miss Jeanne M, Stewart has had lately most enthusiastic 
and successful classes in Boise and Spokane. She will soon re- 
move her studio from Portland, Ore., to Toledo, Ohio. 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee of Chicago has recently moved her 
studio from Aud. Tower to the Fine Arts Bldg., 410 Michigan 
Boulevard, South. 

The friends of D. M. Campana of Chicago, will be glad 
to learn of the removal of his studios to more commodious 
and pleasant quarters at 323-325 S. Wabash Ave. He has 
been in his present location for fifteen years and the business 
has grown to such an extent that new and larger quarters are 
a necessity. 




BREAKFAST SET— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

The little rose design for breakfast set, may be outlined or not. Enamels used— Warren O'Hara's Apple Green (hard) for 

leaves; Yellow No. 1 (hard) for light part of roses, and for center of little flower to right of roses; Yellow No." 2 (hard) 

for dark part of roses, and also for dark part of little flower and dots; Canton Blue (hard) for bands. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



13 




AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER— DORRIS DAWN MILLS (Treatment page 12) 




INDIAN DISH IN DUSTED COLOR— W. K. TITZE (Treatment page 9) 



14 



KERAMIC STUDIO 








CONVENTIONAL VASE-ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
TREATMENT IN LUSTRES 

PAINT in all design with Roman Gold. Fire and burnish. 
Wash over whole vase with Yellow Brown lustre which 
has been thinned with lavender oil. Wipe out all flower forms 
and paint in the small ones and centers of large ones with Orange 
Lustre. Use Yellow Lustre for the largest flowers. 

Last Fire — Give whole vase a thin coat of Yellow Lustre. 

TREATMENT IN ENAMELS 
This design may be carried out in soft enamels on a Belleek 
vase. Leaves Green Enamel No. 2. Large flowers Dull 
Yellow Enamel. Small flowers Rhodian Red. The outer 
bands and parallel bands in design are of gold. 
•f f 
NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler. 
"Impressions of the Art of the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion',, by Christian Brinton. John Lane Company, $3.00. 
Illustrated with reproductions of paintings exhibited in San 
Francisco. 

"Palace of Fine Arts and Lagoon", by Bernard R. Maybeck. 
Paul Elder & Company, 50 cents. Illustrated. 

Both of these books should appeal to those who have seen 
the art of the Exposition and to those who wish they had. 

"The Beautiful Gardens of America", by Louise Shelton. 
Scribner, $5.00. This book is profusely illustrated with fine 



color plates and quantities of half-tones. It is especially appro- 
priate now when "in the spring a woman's fancy lightly turns 
to thoughts of — gardens.'" 

"Michelangelo", by Romain Rolland. Duffield. Illus- 
trated, $2.50. An English translation from the French, dealing 
with the life of the titanic Tuscan painter, sculptor, architect 
and poet. 

Ask for these at your public library. 

<f >? 

BEGINNERS' CORNER NOTE 

Among the prizes is an article by Mrs. H. C. Milner, who 
failed to give her address. Will this contributor kindly send 
it to us. 

i? & 
EXHIBITION NOTE 

The Ceramic League of Philadelphia will hold its 10th 
Annual Exhibition at the Plastic Club, April 28, 29 and 30. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Mrs. J. S. — In doing Empire Tea Set from treatment in Jam Keravuc 
Studio, 1912, I did the design in Gold and painted the roses for first fire and tinted 
with Oriental Ivory for the second. I thought I got out all the color around the 
gold but it seemed not in places and turned the Gi een Bronze dark in places. Will 
it be alright if I go over it again or must it be removed? Also why is the green 
gold streaked? 

Have tried several places to gel the powdered zinc to burn in kiln to clear out 
the chimney but don't seem to find it. Can you tell me where to gel it.' 

The gold will probably come out alright the second time if it isn't very 
bad. You probably used the Green Gold too heavily, it should be applied in 
two thin washes. 

You can get the zinc from a druggist or chemist. 

A Subscriber — What medium is used for Malt colors, and are they mixed 
and applied the*same as glaze powder colors? 

Special oil for dusting is used, they are dry dusted on the same as other 
colors. 

M. H. — Will you kindly give me some information as to how one can mark, 
bands on china with a banding wheel? I have two small china, brushes but per- 
haps there is a special way of mixing the paint for I cannot make bands at all, 
the paint all leaves the brushes in a short lime from the starting point and the color 
thins out into nothing at all. 

A very long brush especially for the purpose should be used. Lavender 
oil is a good medium to use for thinning. It usually takes a good deal of 
practice to learn to use a wheel well. 

Z. B. — Is there anything I can put oner the unglazed parts of china so the 
gold or lustre wont be dull on them.' 

There is nothing that can be put on it. Dry Dusting is more successful 
over them than the Lustre or Gold. 

S. A. G. — What gold would bs best to use on a dinner set, Hasburg's Roman 
Gold or Liquid Matt Gold and hoiv many coats? 

2. How can that frosted appearance be obtained with Gold.' 

1. The Roman Gold is the bettor, liquid gold is not a good color, some 
people prefer Green Gold when the background is left white, two coats should 
be applied. 

2. You probably refer to the etched work, that is if the surface is 
rough. 

E. M. — Can you get a pretty effect to paint on matt colors when it is so you 
cannot dust them? 

2. Why do dark matt colors somet.mes have shiny spots in them' 

3. Is French china less liable to break in firing than German or Vienna? 

4. 7s it better taste to use enamels very high or rather flalf. 

5. I think enamel is so much prettier outlintd, is it more correct to leave it 
with no outline? 

6. Are all strictly conventional designs outlined f 
They do not come out as well when painted as they tire with a slight 



1. 

glaze. 
2. 
3. 
4. 



They are probably fired too strong. 

Not if you use a good piece of the German and Vienna ware. 
It is best not to use them too high as they make the work look coarse 
and heavy unless you are using them on a very large piece of china. 

5. The latest and better way is to use them without the outline as the 
effect is softer and prettier though it is not incorrect to use the outline. 

6. No, most people do not use the outline at all. 



s 



Keramic Studio Books 

Each complete in one volume: Postpaid. 

Grand Feu Ceramics $ 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room 

'■- No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain. Class Room No. 2 .... 3.00 
Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing. Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain. 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 

One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 6.50 

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The Nine Books Complete [21-00 

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KERAMIC STUDIO MAGAZINE, $4.00 PER YEAR 



Premium No. 9 Again! 

Many people are disappointed because we did not continue longer 
our offer of Premium No. 9. We have decided therefore to make 
this offer again, expiring July 1st. 

PREMIUM No. 9 consists of twelve assorted back numbers of 
Keramic Studio published previous to May, 1913, and sent only 
for a new name accompanied by $4.00. If an old subscriber 
wishes to take advantage of this, and send on the name of a friend 
together with her own subscription and enclosure of $8.00, she 
may take her choice of several valuable premiums, described on 
Premium List as No. 2, 5, or 10, and this in addition to Premium 
No. 9 going to the new subscriber. We do not give premiums 
for renewals. We give premiums only for new business, but 
we consider as new an order from one who has not subscribed 
since July 1910. 

Send postal for Premium List if you haven't a copy. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



IN SPITE OF THE WAR 

FRY'S COLORS 

ARE STILL FOR SALE AT THE 

SAME PRICE 

As heretofore, with the additional 
advantage that FRY QUALITY is maintained 



GTO"V ,rf"VS 



JA 



HIGHEST QUALITY 



K 



ir, i r/ -2- , 




TheentirecontentsofthisMagazinearecovered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JUNE, J916 



Editorial 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Kansas City Keramic Club 

Peacock Placque in Enamels 

Plate, Pears 

Bon Bon Box 

Lemonade Pitcher, Yellow Lily 

Plate 

Design for Tea Set 

Beginner's Corner 

Top of Round Box 

After Dinner Cup and Saucer 

Tile, Garden Motif 

Answers to Correspondent* 



Semi-Conventional Plate, Roses 

Vase, Birds and Yellow Daisies 

Borders 

Bowl in Elderberries 

Flower Drawing, Butter and Eggs 

Cockatoo Vase (Monochrome Supplement) 

Flower Garden Bowl (Color Supplement) 

Plant Analysis 



Anita Gray Chandler 

Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Grace B. Hall 
Elise Tally 
Nell Sherrod 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Annie R. Frederick 

Mrs. Katherine Bertram 
M. C McCormick 
M. L. Brigham 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Kathryn E. Cherry 
Adeline More 
W. K. Titze 
Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
Marion L. Fosdick 
Katherine Lindsey Perkins 
Dorothea Warren O'Hara 
Florence Wyman Whitson 



Page 

15 
16 
16-20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
26 
27 
27 
28 
28 



9 

10,11 
12 
12 

13-15 
16 
16 
16 



jgr ■ ■ ' a 

THE OLD RELIABLE HHdUl FITCH KILNS 



The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 




THE ORIGINAL PORTARLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




<e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Size 14 x 12 in $30.00 ) , No. 1 Size 10 x 12 In. $15.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 ta.„ 40.00 G " **» 2 »*« q^, ^ 4 ^ ) No. 2 Size 16 x 12 In. 20.00 

) No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No . 4 Size 18 x 26 in. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



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KERAMIC STUDIO 




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JUNE 1916 
KERAMIC STU DIO 



COCKATOO VASE-KATHERINE LINDSEY PERKINS 
See Naturalistic Section, page 16, for treatment 



KERAMIC STUDIO P U B . CO- 



Vol. XVIII, No. 2. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



June 1916 




EARS of a scarcity of white china 
which were expressed at the be- 
ginning of the war were not justi- 
fied. Of course stocks are more 
or less broken and assortments are 
not as plentiful as they were a year 
10, there is a scarcity of brush 
and comb trays, and china dinner 
sets in general, and as time goes on 
this scarcity will be felt more on 
items which are used extensively, especially on flat pieces. 
But altogether it may be confidently expected that there will 
be supplies enough to last until the end of the war. 

At that time a large quantity of German china will be 
released. German factories have kept working full time in 
making china and the china in the white is stored and ready 
for shipment as soon as the opportunity is given. Of course 
for the present no German china is available. 

French china is coming regularly but French factories 
have advanced their prices considerably and the quality is not 
what it was before the war. Besides they are contemplating 
another advance due to the scarcity and high price of coal. 
So that china decorators must make up their mind that they 
will have to pay more for the ware at least until the war is over. 
But everything else is going up in price, not only colors, glass 
vials and other materials which they use, but also the general 
cost of living. They must simply adjust themselves to new 
conditions by raising the price of their finished work. 

The Japanese white china of which some shipments have 
been received this year has been veiy well received, but it is 
doubtful if large shipments will come over at any time and 
commercially it will not rank with the French or German 
china. Some of the shapes are copied from French and Ger- 
man shapes and are a close imitation without having the fine 
modeling of the French ware. However a great drawback is 
that most shapes are the same shapes which the Japanese them- 
selves decorate and send over at very low prices, so that ama- 
teur decorators have to compete with a cheap decorated ware 
sold in the department stores. 

Nothing has been done so far for a white china of Ameri- 
can make. It may be that this question will be taken up after 
the war but under present conditions, when factories are two 
or three months behind with their orders, there is no likelihood 
that any regular pottery will experiment with white china. 



As a result of the scarcity or rather fear of scarcity of white 
china, it is interesting to note that a number of china decora- 
tors have resorted to glass decoration and have been very- 
successful. This is very interesting work and worth trying, 
and it reminds us that we receive quite often letters asking us 
where materials can be obtained for this work, glassware, col- 
ors, etc., and as none of our advertisers mentions any of these 
materials, we are unable to give the requested information. 
We think that there is quite a field for decorators in glass work. 
It will require some experimenting to find the exact point of 
firing. The firing should be stopped as soon as there is color 
in the kiln, but how much color will vary with different kilns 



and this will have to be regulated by practice, otherwise the 
work is not more difficult than china decoration. We expect 
to have in the July issue advertisements of both glass shapes 
and glass colors. We understand that the demand for deco- 
rated glass is growing rapidly and we consider that this field 
of amateur decoration will be. a permanent field. We also 
expect to publish articles on this work especially written for 
beginners. 

* * * 

Additional interesting letters in answer to V. S. P. are 
here given: 

Now while I do not agree with the author of the letter in all that she says, 
I do know how she feels about using the realistic designs on her china instead 
of the severe conventional designs. I believe it is her strong love for beautiful 
flowers that makes her feel that way, being somewhat of a lover of flowers myself 
I can get her view point exactly. But, strong as my own liking is for nature 
just as we see it, yet we must know that to reproduce nature on canvas or a 
piece of water-color paper is a very different thing from reproducing it on a 
piece of china. If we can't within ourselves feel and know that a simple con- 
ventional design is more suited to a dinner plate than a rose even though we 
are able to paint it as beautiful as it is possible for human hands to do so, then 
we must train ourselves to know which is right and I believe if we follow the 
good designs given in Keramic Studio we won't go far amiss in our training 
either. Surely I, for one, am willing to take the judgment and word of those 
who for years have been endeavoring to give the best of their talent toward 
helping their fellow workers. In my own experience in teaching and paint- 
ing for orders, I will have to admit that conventional designs aren't always 
as popular as I wish they were but I am happy to say I have very little call 
for the old naturalistic way of painting. Keramic Studio certainly has been 
a great help to me because it is very hard to keep an interest in art of any kind 
here and the designs given in the magazine must be right or they wouldn't 
be there. So, dear Editor of Keramic Studio and all your co-workers that 
are trying to give us the best of your talent, here's a wish for 1916, a wish full 
of encouragement and best wishes for a greater success than ever before. 

LUCY M. BROWN. 

I think that to compare naturalistic and conventional manners of de- 
signing, one must well understand each kind. Many naturalistic designs give 
me by color, rhythm and spacing, just the same thrill of pleasure that I feel 
from good conventional designs. Anything through which flows that "Pat- 
tern from the Infinite" cannot fail to touch an appreciative mind and to some 
extent we all of us have a touch of that gaining slowly. One can sometimes 
see that the naturalistic is a mechanical copy from nature and sometimes ideal. 
The conventional is also made with or without ideality. Each kind (real 
or ideal) may be naturalistic, conventional, Japanese or from any source. 
Our own nature must decide upon the proper application. On many table 
dishes the naturalistic would not please me, but on a bon bon dish or any other 
where a flower itself would not be distasteful, I can see no reason why a well 
painted flower is not appropriate. It seems to me a more correct and higher 
division of classes to say instead of naturalistic and conventional the ideal 
and materialistic, many of course are partly of each kind. We see these same 
kinds in e\ ery art. Many figures, landscapes, flowers and still life represented 
give always an exquisite thrill of pleasure and we love them, while the ma- 
terialistic kind sometimes makes us feel how well that was painted but not care 
for ownership. Real art has something about it beyond the material. You 
gave the same thought in speaking of the passage of the eternal thought 
through us, with strong belief in eternal progression. F. N. R. 

The people who are trying to uplift any art or science usually must stand 
a great deal of criticism; and so with the editor of the Keramic Studio. Those 
who criticise conventional designs on account of the rigid fines and all this 
and that, show that they still have something to learn. When a student 
takes up the study of art and intends to become an artist or designer, he must 
have natural talents. The most essential are imagination and idealism. 
Usually, he loves nature in all her forms and beauty, and soon can copy what 
is set before him but somehow or other his study always looks stiff; he studies 



16 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



his rules and adheres to them too rigidly instead of following his inspiration 
and feeling and being guided by the rules. 

When he comes to conventionalization of nature we ask him to find a 
natural study and he goes tramping to a florist for some beautiful flower and 
probably comes back with some rare specimen and on the very way has stepped 
on and over some of the most useful and beautiful subjects, which are often 
common flowers and weeds. At conventionalizing he has a chance to show 
his inspiration, individuality and invention. At first he cannot see any beauty 
in the conventionalized forms. He cannot see where nature conventionalizes 
until he is shown that in flowers, weeds, seeds, leaves and even trees, nature 
has made both sides almost if not exactly alike. When shown these things 
he will discover the really beautiful work of nature; how thoughtfully each 
and every petal and seed is placed, what beautiful color schemes, what won- 
derful lines he can derive from her and apply in design. 

In regard to poor designs in a magazine, these students who are not yet 
at the height of their ideals (if they ever get there) are encouraged by think- 
ing their designs are at least as good if not a little better. If enthusiastic a 
student will always try to get his next design a little better than the last one, 
and try to make it as good as another student a little more advanced. In 
this way the magazine should inspire and encourage the student and not be 
a book full of nice patterns to copy and make according to directions. Some 
of these poor designs can be changed by the student, in that way putting some 
of his own individuality in it, UNSIGNED. 

NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Grey Chandler 

"Chinese Art Motives Interpreted", by Winifred Reed 
Tredwell. Illustrated with drawings and photographs, some 
of the latter being reproductions of the famous George Salting- 
collection of porcelains at the South Kensington Museum, 
England. The author has taken up in detail, Nature and 
flower motives, symbols of Taoist Immortals, of culture and ' 
honor, and of Confucius and Buddha. She has endeavored 
to reflect the life of China underlying Chinese art. G. P. P. 
Putnam Sons, $1.75. 

"Buddhist Art," by M. Anesaki, M. A., Litt., D., Pro- 
fessor of the Science of Religion in the Imperial University of 
Tokyo, and Professor of Japanese Literature and Life at Har- 
vard University. Profusely illustrated with photographs 
and a large color plate frontispiece. Dr. Anesaki gave the 
contents of the book in a course of lectures at the Boston Mu- 
seum of Fine Arts. Published by the Museum of Fine Arts, 
$6.00. 

Both of these books would be most valuable reading to 
any keramist who has a liking for the Oriental, or who wishes 
to know more of porcelains-. Both are full of suggestions. 

Ask for these at your public library. 

DESIGN FOR TEA SET (Page 26) 

Annie R. Frederick 

TO be carried out on Belleek or Satsuma. Outline design 
in Black. The grey bands, handles, small square at the 
bottom and the two figures under the black band in center 
are Gold. If carried out on Belleek the Gold should be omitted 
until the second fire so the enamels can have a hard fire. The 
light part in large dark flowers is 1 part Naples Enamel and 1 
part white and the darker tone is equal parts Jersey Cream 
and white. The large light flowers are Maiden Blush with 
centers of the lighter Yellow. Small light flowers are Arabian 
Blue. Leaves and grey geometric figures at the lower part 
of tea pot are Florentine No. 12 and the dark bands and figures 
are Azure Blue. If a background tint is desired paint on a 
thin wash of Yellow Brown and a little Dark Grey. 

SUMMER SCHOOL NOTE 

A big attendance is expected at the classes which Mrs. K. 
E. Cherry will open on June 7th. at the store of B. K. Elliott 
& Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 







Mrs. Padfield Mrs. Padfield Mrs. McDougal 

Miss Harris Miss Harris Mrs. Tuyman 

Mrs. Padfield Mrs. Findley 



KANSAS CITY KERAMIC CLUB EXHIBITION 

WE give in this number illustrations of the last Kansas City 
Keramic Club exhibition, which was very successful. 
Lack of space prevents us from giving a detailed description 
of the most interesting pieces. The main feature of the exhibit 
was a nine course dinner set in the primary colors, red, yellow 
and blue, which was done by different members of the Club, 
the colors being used in different intensities. The effect was 
very pleasing. Another feature of the exhibit was a large 
number of electroliers. 




Mrs. J. W. Smith Mrs. Gibbons Mrs. Barker 

Miss Bartholdt Miss Barker Miss Halbert 

It is a little unfortunate that the illustrations do not 
quite do justice to the work, as in many cases it is difficult to 
see the designs plainly. We cannot repeat too often that it 
is most important, for reproduction in a Magazine, to have 
really good photographs. It is safer to photograph small 




Miss Bayha 

Miss Smith 



Mrs. E. E. Smith 
Miss Borch 



Mrs. James 
Miss Smith 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



17 




MRS. ALYS M. BINNEY 



groups than large ones, chances are better that each piece will 
show the design clearly. However even photographs of large 
groups will be satisfactory if the services of a really good photo- 
grapher are secured. We should give as an example the illus- 
trations of the Duquesne Club in last issue. " Last year the 
Duquesne Club sent us very poor photographs but this year 



they were excellent. There is much room for improvement 
in the photographing done by the Kansas City Club and we 
ask them to give more attention to this matter next year. We 
would also say that it is important to have a plain, solid back- 
ground for photographing of china, a fancy, flowery back- 
ground is not suitable. 




Mrs. J. H. Daley 

Mrs. Barney 



Mrs. Daley 

Mrs. W. T. Timlin 

KANSAS CITY KERAMIC CLUB 



Mrs. Burney 
Miss Daley 



18 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. Moore Miss Verona Borch Mrs. Lynval Davidson 



Mrs. Moore 
Miss J. E. McFadden 



Mrs. G. H. Bilheiner 
Mrs. J. W. Moore 




Mrs. J. E. McFadden 



~£lWM4& 



m 



■rZ 




MRS. PAULINE JAMES 





Mrs. Estelle McDougal Mrs. Morris Mrs. Twyman 

Mrs. Gibbons Miss Bartbotdt 



Maude E. Nutter 



KANSAS CITY KERAMIC CLUB 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



19 




Mrs. J. N. Moore Mrs. Barker 

Miss Mertie Halbert 



Miss Mary Barker 




Robert D. Haire 



Miss Josephine Bayha 



Miss Mary Barker Mrs. Kate Ward 




NINE COURSE DINNER SET IN RED, YELLOW AND BLUE 




Mrs. A. E. Findley Mrs. Haise 

Mrs. Nutter Mrs. I. E. Barker 



Mrs. Kate Ward 

KANSAS CITY KERAMIC CLUB 



Mrs. Hannah Cuthbertson 



20 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. G. W. Smith Mrs. McFadden 

Mrs. Eva Twyman Mrs. Nutter 




Mrs. Roy Gleason Mrs. Gleason Miss Halbert 

Miss Mcrtie Halbert Miss Vic Harris 




MRS. A. E. FINDLEY 




MRS. J. E. BARKER 

KANSAS CITY KERAMIC CLUB 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



21 




PEACOCK PLACQUE, IN ENAMELS— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



AFTER tracing and outlining the design with Mineral 
Black (water mixture) oil and dust the foreground with 
Grey Green and the panels of the border and the background 
of the border units with Satsuma or Mason's Neutral Yellow. 
Clean and lay all of the paths with Gold. (The spaces between 
the color areas of the feathers are continuous with the border 
path.) Now fire and after regilding prepare the following 
enamels. If O'Hara's enamels are used you will find New 
Green, Dark Green, Neutral Green and Blue Green. Dark 
Yellow may be dulled with Brown to give the Yellow Brown 
for the lower portion of the wing or Yellow Brown may be found 
in some other enamel palettes. If the body of the bird is 
shaded as suggested by the values of the design, it will be 
necessary to mix the Blue Green, New Green and Dark Green 
in three different lots showing a rhythm from New Green to 
Dark Green. Begin by floating the head feathers with the 
darker Green mixture (all but the eye spots) over the head. 



The Blue Green pure may be floated gradually working into 
the dark green mixture for the throat and back. Over the 
breast work in the lighter green made of the New Green and 
Dark Green going back to the Darker Green mixture for the 
legs. The .small areas of the tail are laid with Dark Green and 
the larger areas with Neutral Green. All of the eye spots with 
Blue Green. The upper portion of the wing is New Green. 
The middle portion Dark Green on Neutral Green and the 
lower portion the Yellow Brown. New Green is used in the 
smaller areas of the border units and Blue Green for the central 
spot. If one is not expert enough to float the three shades of 
enamel on the head and body of the bird a flat tone may be 
used of the Blue Green 3-4 and Dark Green 1-4 mixed. If 
the plaque is a soft glaze two coats of enamel may be used. 
If hard glaze the outlines will want to be perfected before lay- 
ing the enamels as only one coat is possible. 



22 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




mm 



PLATE, PEARS— GRACE B. HALL 

Oil leaves and stems and dust with Florentine Green. Oil background back of fruit and dust with Glaze for Green. 
Oil the pears and dust with 1 part Yellow for Dusting and 1 part Ivory Glaze. Omit the lines in the pear. 
Paint the dark spaces in the bands with Green Gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



23 




BON BON BOX— ELISE TALLY 



On Satsuma in enamels. Black outlines and all spaces between flowers and leaves. Bands Gold. Leaves \ New Green and 

§ Green No. 2. Flowers in polychrome enamels. For lightest spaces in flowers and 

between gold bands let Satsuma show. 



24 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




LEMONADE PITCHER, YELLOW LILY— NELL SHERROD 



OIL stems and the leaf forms and dust with 2 parts Floren- 
tine and 1 part Ivory Glaze. Oil the dark tones in the 
flower and dust with Deep Ivory and the light tones with 
Yellow for Dusting. 



Second Fire — The entire background may be oiled and 
dusted equal parts Pearl Grey, Ivory Glaze and a pinch of 
Albert Yellow, or it may be painted on with Albert Yellow 
and a little Dark Grey. It should be a cream tint. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



25 




PLATE— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

Outline design carefully. Then oil the dark blue, dust with Dark Blue for Dusting. Clean the edges. Then 
oil the light blue, dust Water Green 1 part, Glaze for Blue 2 parts. 



26 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DESIGN FOR TEA SET— ANNIE R. FREDERICK 



(Treatment page 16) 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 



A SUGGESTION 

Laura Bartlett Mecutcken 

I FIND that small, folding tables with the top neatly cov- 
ered with white oil-cloth are the best to work on for china. 
Mine are so light that I can pick them up and move them with 
most of my materials on them, a good thing in cold weather 
when one must sit near the heat early in the morning. 

» » 

ADVICE TO BEGINNERS 

Edna M. Wihnont 

MY advice to beginners in china painting is — first of all, 
do not, please do not, begin to "take lessons" unless 
you are serious in wishing to learn to paint, and are not just 
"taking lessons to get a few pieces I've always wanted", 
which means that the little merit, if any, attached to said pieces 
will be what the teacher has done. Usually, what the "pupil" 
has daubed on under such conditions, simply spells ruin to the 
work. If pieces of china are what you want, go to some repu- 
table artist and buy his work outright — which will be worth 
more to the "pupil", the artist, and the world at large. Ameri- 
can homes and stores are already too full of badly painted 
china, which is neither artistic nor beautiful. The country 
is also scourged with inartistic, illy prepared teachers. If 
you are in earnest, find the best teacher to be had, the best 
pays from the beginning, and prepare yourself for many weary 
hours of painting, wiping out and painting in again, striving 
always to improve over the former effort. Never hesitate to 
take out work and do it over again. The secret of success 
in china painting, as in everything else, is "keeping everlast- 
ingly at it." Study the work of others, taking note of how it 
may help you to improve something in your own work. Re- 
member that the head must work as well as the hands. 

The earnest worker will have many days of exaltation over 
some achievement perhaps succeeded by days, or weeks, in 
which she will dwell with despair in the slough of despond, only 



to go to work again with renewed vigor and hope, working 
away to final accomplishment. 

I trust this article may put heart in some discouraged 
beginners, as it is written from the heart by one who has made 
an uphill fight against many obstacles, but who is beginning 
to see a "bright light" due to strength of purpose and dogged 
perserverance. 

» » 

OUTLINING 

Zoa E. Brown 

IN conventional work, a good outline is all-important. That 
shaky undecided line which so many beginners get, even 
after considerable effort, will ruin the appearance of the finished 
product, even though the rest of the work is well done. First 
of all, care should be taken in mixing the black out-lining 
paint. Place a very small quantity on a slab and grind it well, 
then add enough medium to make it about the consistency 
of thin cream. When these are well ground together, place 
the mixture in a well of the palette, add a drop of turpentine 
and stir well with the palette knife. Then try it on the palette 
cover, it may be necessary to add more turpentine, but be sure 
that it is mixed exactly right before starting to outline. If it 
is too thin the line will spread, if too thick it will not flow from 
the pen readily enough. It is always best to prepare just a 
little at a time as the freshly mixed paint will give better re- 
sults than that which has been standing for several days. Use 
a fine pen for fine lines and a coarse one for heavier work. 
Trouble sometimes arises from using a pen too long. Change 
for a new one often and wipe pen frequently while using. Work 
slowly, holding pen quite erect and using same pressure through- 
out design. The result should be a firm line of uniform width 
with almost no cleaning out to be done. 

K K 

HELPFUL HINTS 

Lizzie H. Goulding 

ONE difficulty often experienced by teachers is that many 
pupils are unable to imagine how the black and white 
or "half-tone" designs will look when worked out in color. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



27 



This is especially true of pupils beginning china decoration 
with no knowledge of other branches of painting. Of course 
if the teacher does much commercial decorating of china the 
pupils can copy her simpler designs, but when she is teaching 
several branches of painting she often has little time to spend 
decorating china simply to be copied by beginners; and it is 
often very monotonous to have the same piece copied many, 
many times. One method of overcoming these difficulties 
may be found in the use of water colors. Take for illustra- 
tion the rose design on page 150 of the November, 1914 Keramic 
Studio. To a beginner it presents few possibilities but the 
teacher can see in it at least half a dozen colorings; so let her 
take a piece of rather smooth paper and paint on it all the 
different colorings suitable for beginners, using only two or 
three repetitions. After seeing this it is only a short step for 
the pupil to understand that any other conventional rose or 
floral pattern may be treated the same way. Next select a 
few good simple conventional patterns and paint each in a 
variety of colorings, then explain just the class of designs 
that may be treated like each one of them. Half a dozen 
designs if well chosen will provide great variety for the pupil 
and it is often surprising how quickly they begin to see for 
themselves the possibilities of the designs in the magazine and 
do work that has some originality. 





TOP OF ROUND BOX 

Mrs. Katherine Bertram 
UTLINE with Black. Stems and bands are Gold. Sec- 
ond Fire — Oil leaves and grey spaces under flowers and 
dust with 2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 Dark Grey, | part 
Coffee Brown. The light part of leaf is dusted 
with Deep Ivory. Flowers are oiled and dusted 
with Yellow for Dusting. Small centers in flower 
are Deep Ivory. Third Fire — Oil all over back- 
ground and dust with 2 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory Glaze 
and a pinch of Albert Yellow. 




Mn~ ni^m~m ~r 



AFTER DINNER CUP AND SAUCER— M. C. McCORMICK 



THE large central flower is of Dark Blue toned with J 
Mauve, center Yellow, dot in middle Red. Flowers 
on either side of center one, equal parts Pompadour and Capu- 
cine Red; centers Apple Green. Small flowers in bunches of 
three are Silver Yellow toned with a little Deep Purple. Leaves, 
Apple Green toned with Deep Purple and a little Brunswick 



Black. All of these have a small amount of enamel added, 
with the exception of the reds. The edges, geometrical lines 
and handle of cup are of Gold. Bands inside the edges are of 
Dark Blue toned with a small amount of Brunswick Black, 
no enamel. The bands at base of cup and in center of saucer 
are in broken lines of gold and green. 



28 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TILE, GARDEN MOTIF 

M. L. Brigham 

OIL trees and dust with 1 part Florentine and 1 part Bright 
Green. Oil pots, inner circle and the fence around 
the edge and dust with Water Blue. Oil the dark grey back- 
ground and dust with Grey Blue. Oil the light tone and dust 
with 4 parts Glaze for Green and 1 part Pearl Grey. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. A . — Can the same lustre one uses for china be used on glass or does some 
special kind cornel Also how do you fire it? Does glass have about the same heat 
you would have for soft enamels or silver? Is it difficult to pad lustre on glass 
and is it apt to break in firing and what kind of glass should one use? Would 
the glass advertised for cooking utensils be good to use? 

Special colors come for glass but you may be able to use the same lustre 
as for china, it is best to make a test. 

Glass requires a very light fire just until you can see color coming in the 
kiln and then it is best to open the door so the heat is not retained. It is not 
so apt to break as it is to melt. No it would not be difficult to pad the lustre. 
Any good quality of glass can be used, we do not know about the cooking uten- 
sils but think they could be used. See editorial about glass. 

M. M. B. — Would you kindly give me some information about etching on 
china? 

Trace design and outline with India ink then go over all parts that are to 
be left raised with a heavy coating of turpentine asphaltum, this acts as a 
resist for the acid. The part to be etched is left white, all other surface must 
be covered with the asphaltum. When dry apply hydrofluoric acid. 
Great care must be used with this acid as it is very dangerous, the least drop 
on the flesh will cause serious trouble. To apply, take a brush handle and 
wrap a small piece of cotton tightly over the end and dip the cotton in the 
acid and then apply it to the white surface of the china just enough to dampen 
it, repeat this process when it looks dry, it usually needs to be applied about 
a half dozen times or more until the edges look deep enough. Then wash 
off the acid with running water and remove the asphaltum with either turpen- 
tine or kerosene. It is more easily removed if kept warm. 

G. H. Van W. — May anyone send designs to be printed in the Keramie 
and in what form? 

2. Could one send designs that have been in earlier Keramics executed in 
a different way such as a plate design on sugar and salts? 

3. Can green bronze be covered with Green Gold and should the green gold 
be put on once or twice? 



1. Yes, anyone may send designs, it is best to carry them out neatly 
in black and white and grey. 

2. We prefer original designs as it would hardly be fair to the owner of 
the design unless you just used the motif and changed the design. 

3. Yes, it can be used. The green gold should be applied twice. 

M, 0. — 7s acid etching practical for dinner sets, does it wear as ivclt as 
gold bands? 

2. Is good work in etching, in dainty patterns, likely to be done by the 
average amateur? 

3. How is the etching done that the dealers offer ready to put the gold on? 
By hand? 

4. I have had the Studio for three years and considering it authority as I 
do, I fell that the doing of etching oneself must not be satisfactory since no designs 
for it are shown and almost nothing said about it. Am I right? 

1. Yes, it is practical and very attractive. 

2. Just as good work can be done by the amateurs in etching as in any 
other line if they are painstaking. 

3. The designs are probably stamped on. Some of the work may be 
done by hand but not all of it. 

4. Yes, the etching is very satisfactory. No one has happened to send 
in designs and besides it is not best for the average person to experiment 
with without an instructor as the acid is very strong and dangerous. 

A. M. — Is it possible to remove all lustre from a vase that had two firings 
with acid? What acid would you use and how, and can the vase be used for an- 
other design in paint? Can gold be removed in the same way? 

2. Is it belter to use a brush in dusting on color or use a pad of cotton and 
silk? 

3. Can I use Warren 0' Hara's white with a color as a mixing white or is 
it used like any other enamel, on a darker background? 

4. Are original designs from any contributor bought by the Keramie Studio 
if they ore sent in and are acceptable? How large must (hey be in, who! medium? 

1. Yes, lustre comes off very easily. The dealers carry an acid called 
"China Eraser" that is not as harmful as some acids and does the work satis- 
factorily although care should be taken in using it to keep it off the hands. 
Wrap a small piece of cotton on the end of a stick and dip it in the bottle of 
eraser and apply to the piece to be erased by rubbing it across the color. Re- 
move the acid from the china with water as soon as the work is done to prevent 
it from eating into the glaze. Gold can be taken off in the same way but needs 
a little more rubbing as it does not come off as easily as the lustre. The vase 
can be used for another design. 

2. It is better to use a brush on small surfaces especially if more than 
one color is dusted on because you can keep the color off the other colors 
but on a large background surface a soft piece of cotton can be used, but no 
silk. 

3. Yes, the white can be used with other colors or alone. 

4. Yes, designs are bought from any one if they are something that 
we can use. There is no specified size. It is usually best to send them in the 
black, white and grey tones unless the color is to be reproduced. 

I, A. — What is the reason for dark blue which has fired with a beautiful 
glaze, going dull in the second fire? I use a great deal of this and gild on it but 
nearly always there are parts which go quite dull although the gold will be perfect. 

It may be caused by an underfire which would not affect the gold as that 
requires only a light fire or there may be something in the medium for your 
gold that affects it, dampness in the kiln will also cause dull spots. 

J. G. A. — Please tell me if raised paste work is out of date or is it because 
so few people know how to do it well and it lakes so m ucli linn that one sees so Utile of it 
in the west? Is it appropriate for odd pieces on the tabic such as sugars and 
creamers, service plates, etc. and what else? 

In the last issue of Harpers Bazaar I saw pictures of service plates of the 
crowned heads of Europe, would one be allowed to copy these scrolls and make 
designs similar to sell? 

Is it permissible to use etching and raised paste on the same article? 

Raised paste is not used much now for no special reason except that a 
different style of work is being used. 

Yes, it could be used on the pieces you mention and also on vases, bon 
bon dishes, card trays, etc., but is not good for plates or anything that is used 
to put greasy things on as the paste will catch it. 

You may copy anything from a magazine but not publish it if it is 
copyrighted. 

Yes, the etching and raised paste may be used together but it is not usually 
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•f •? 

STUDIO NOTE 
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studio open throughout the summer under capable manage- 
ment, and will personally be on hand two or three days each 
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^ 



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Cover Design 



of 



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K-E1.EL/R 



M EL, F^l RJ 



A^L-1 V^EL- 



JUN 26 1916 



CONTRIBUTORS 



HAZEL H. ADLER 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

IDA NOWELS COCHRAN 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

JETTA EHLERS 

MRS. F. McGAUGHY 

DORRIS DAWN MILLS 

ADELINE MOORE 

M. G. MYERS 

W. K. TITZE 

EXHIBITION OF THE KERAMIC 

SOCIETY OF GREATER NEW YORK 



JULY NICMXVI Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



f\ MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR TttE POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



TheentirecontentsofthisMagazineare covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF JULY, 1916 , 



r*ra 



Page 



Editorial 

Exhibition of the Keramic Society of Greater New York Hazel H. Adler 

Table Sets and Pieces Exhibited 

Table Decoration Jetta Ehlers 



Shell Plate 

Cup and Saucer and Teapot 

Small Plate, Rose Border 

Salts and Peppers 

Plate in Yellow Roses 

Bowl, Violets 

Plate 

Summer School Notes 

Rose Plate 

Bowl or Plate Design 

Dorothy Perkins Rose (Color Supplement) 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Tile, Cup and Saucer (Color Supplement) 

Answers to Correspondents 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 

Adeline More 
Mrs. F. C McGaughy 
Dorris Dawn Mills 
Dorris Dawn Mills 
Ida Nowels Cochran 
Dorris Dawn Mills 
Kathryn E. Cherry 

Adeline More 

W. K. Titze 

M. G. Myers 

Anita Gray Chandler 

Wm. K. Titze 



29 
29-40 
30-44 
40-44 



17 
18 
19 
19 

20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
23 
24 
24 
24 
24 



6 



THE OLD RELIABLE WHa FITCH KILNS 



% 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 Size 14 x 12 In $30.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 In. 40.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



Gas Kiln 2 sixes 



Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes 



/ No. 1 Size 10 x 12 in. $15.00 

j No. 2 Size 16 x 12 in. 20.00 

) No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in. 25.00 

I No. 4 Size 18 x 26 in..... 50.00 



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STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Springfield, Ohio 



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KERAMIC STUDIO 




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KERAMIC STUDIO 




ILE, CUP AND SAUCER-w. K.TiTZE 
See Naturalistic Section, page 24, for treatment 



JULY 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 19 16 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 




Vol. XVIII, No. 3. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



July 1916 




HE beautiful illustrations of the 
Greater New York Society Exhibi- 
tion take so much room in the Con- 
ventional Section of the Magazine 
that no place is left for designs, with 
the exception of some naturalistic 
studies in the Naturalistic Section. 
However this fine exhibit is so rich 
in excellent designs and suggestions 
of all kinds for decorators that we 
have no doubt this number will be considered by our sub- 
scribers a most valuable and interesting one. The photographs 
are very clear and illustrations of this kind, giving so many 
ideas for the decoration of both table and tableware, are as 
useful as designs. 

We have to postpone the articles on glass decoration 
which we had announced. We have written to several glass 
decorators for articles and to glass manufacturers for adver- 
tisements of glassware, but the matter is not in shape yet. 
We would be glad to receive from subscribers suggestions in 
regard to this department, also names and addresses of deco- 
raters who would be qualified to give us contributions, as we 
want by next fall to give special attention to this field. Dec- 
orated glassware is constantly growing in demand and the 
field seems to us very promising. 



EXHIBITION OF THE KERAMIC SOCIETY OF GREATER 
NEW YORK 

Hazel H. Adler 

The Keramic Society of Greater New York held its annual 
exhibition from April 5th to April 19th in the Natural History 
Museum of New York City. Several important features dis- 
tinguished it from other exhibitions of its kind, and it was con- 
sidered by many to have marked an epoch in the development 
of American Keramic Art. 

Through its location, in the first place, in" a prominent 
room of one of the city's great Museums, it was able to reach 
a large number of people who would never have known of it 
otherwise and who, in many cases, were awakened for the first 
time to the existence of the modern school of overglaze decora- 
tion. 

Instead of the usual exhibition method of display, a new 
arrangement was instituted which attempted to show the re- 
lation between keramics and modern ideas of home furnishing. 
To this end individual works were displayed as far as possible 
as units either on trays or separate tables and with especially 
designed linens to carry out the color schemes and decorative 
ideas. 

The general level of the work was uniformly high both in 
conception and execution, and the decorations chosen showed 
the influence of two years of careful study of primitive art in 
the Museum. It was evident that great pains had been taken 
in the selection of shapes, and the seemingly free and spontan- 
eous use of color showed a foundation of experimentation and 
study. 



For a number of years the outlook of the keramic worker 
has been narrow, but the increasing interest which is being 
taken in interior decoration at present, is beginning to focus 
attention once more upon the table and the importance of 
appropriate and individual ware. 

The keynote of the exhibition and a feature of unusual 
interest were three complete tables assembled by Marshal 
Fry and occupying the center of the room. These tables, 
separated from each other by screens, were decorated for dif- 
ferent occasions and to fit various types of interiors. They 
all voiced a plea for more color on the table. 

The first table was described by Mr. Fry as a scheme of 
pewter, Capri pottery and yellow Wedgewood. In the center 
was a shallow fluted bowl of pale pinkish lavender from which 
slender graceful iris' arose out of a bed of soft blue, lavender, 
yellow and rose colored marbles. A little alabaster figure 
stood guard in the middle. The table cloth was of fine yellow 
linen with a wide border of crash edged with violet, peacock 
and orange embroidery, and its four corners held down with 
gold tassels. The candlesticks, porringers, goblets and fruit 
bowls were of pewter. Yellow Wedgewood china and yellow 
candles completed the color scheme and the bright colored 
glass fruits in the bowls were additional notes of interest. The 
table proper was also designed by Mr. Fry and finished in 
silver with touches of green and gold. 

While the first table was set for a dinner it was intended 
for one of an intimate and informal nature. The second table 
was designed for a more formal dinner amid more formal sur- 
roundings. The scheme was built up from the distinguished 
Italian comports and the miniature garden balustrade. 

An oyster white linen runner with a narrow filet edge was 
laid the full length of the table. Inside the balustrade were 
six square lavender mats with filet edge. The oblong place 
cloths had large squares of filet on either end, and the napkins 
were oyster white with strips of lavender running through the 
center. A bird bath, four white goblets holding lavender sweet 
peas, two comports with brightly colored fruits and four candle- 
sticks with glass globes were also within the balustrade. The 
china was white Wedgewood with a small blue figure and the 
table itself was painted a soft dull blue. 

The third table was intended for an informal luncheon or 
breakfast in a cottage or country house where the free use of 
color might be suitable. 

The lavender linen table cloth had a deep checked border 
of blue and white with a black and gold Chinese tassel at each 
corner. The place cloths were light blue linen with. a narrow 
border of checks, and the nakpins were also of blue linen with 
centers of checks. Four blue Bristol glass bowls held tall stalks 
of purple iris. The china was blue Wedgewood and doilies 
of a shade deeper blue were laid under the saucers forming a 
pleasing graduation to the place cloths. The other decora- 
tions were of glass and pewter. A black table with touches of 
silver, green and violet supplied a contrasting note of interest. 

Around the outer edges of the room the work of the mem- 
bers of the society was represented, arranged, as I mentioned 
above, in individual groups. Beginning on the left hand side 
we came first to a breakfast set by Dorothea Warren O'Hara. 
The ware was Belleek and the set included coffee and tea serv- 



30 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CAPRI POTTERY, YELLOW WEDGEWOOD AND PEWTER— MARSHAL FRY 



ice, egg cups, porridge bowls, covered dishes and a combination 
pancake and syrup dish. The decoration consisted of bright 
little conventionalized nosegays and raised gold beading. 
There was an air of quaintness and charm about it which 
tempted one to stretch the imagination and place it in a Colo- 
nial dining room with mahogany, white enamel and old silver. 
The cloth was of a coarse oyster white linen and extended in 
the shape of a cross to form four place cloths. 

On the second table were two charming tea sets each on 
its individual tray, one by Lillian C. Smith and the other by 
Alice L. Dalmore. Mrs. Smith's set was on lavender Wedge- 
wood which really is not lavender at all but a delightful shade 
of blue. The inspiration for the design came from a cross 
stitch pattern in an old sampler and was executed in Floren- 
tine blue, blue green and dull pink. The bamboo tray was 
enameled to match the china and its cover was of darker blue 
linen with a self toned crocheted edge. The napkins were of 
linen a shade between the china and the tray cloth and the 
motif of the china was embroidered in cross stitch in the corner. 

Miss Dalmore's set was of deep blue highly lustred china, 
with a conventionalized design in green, soft yellow and rose 
outlined in black. The tray was enameled black with touches 
of color on the edge and the cloth was ecru linen. 

Two other interesting tea sets were contributed by Nina 
Hatfield. One was on gray crackled ware with a waving bor- 
der of bright blue and old rose and a small conventionalized 
flower motif in blue and rose. It was shown on a gray wicker 
tray with a dull rose cloth and napkins to match with the motif 
embroidered in the corner. The other set was intended for a 



porch service and was of an unusual shade between an old rose 
and a violet with a border of deep blue. It was exhibited on a 
deep blue wicker table and an indigo linen tray cover with 
squares of cross stitch done in blue and rose violet, while the 
napkins were of the latter shade embroidered in blue. Lit- 
tle blue doilies whose four corners were held down by jade 
beads formed the covers for the lemon dish and cream pitcher. 

Mrs. Hatfield also exhibited a lamp with a tan crackled 
base decorated with black parrots and touches of orange, 
green and violet; a pitcher of lavender Capri ware with a primi- 
tive design in soft blue and lavender which several authorities 
considered to be one of the finest specimens of overglaze decor- 
ation which has been made in this country; and a set of pitcher 
and cups on buff ware with orange, yellow and black decora- 
tion in strong, simple design. 

A card table service also on buff ware was exhibited by 
Esther A. Coster and its decoration in bright green and red 
brown struck a pleasing note. The table mats and napkins 
were of deeper brown linen buttonholed in white, green and 
yellow. 

Georgia Pierce Unger displayed a very original service in 
green, white and black with a design suggested by the Ameri- 
can Indian. The accompanying linens were tan bound with 
green. 

Six service plates by Cornelia P. Nelson with interesting 
borders of black and gold were well conceived and executed. 

Anna E. Fitch exhibited a Country Service of yellow and 
black. A runner of black with a yellow border extended the 
full length of the table and the place cloths were also of black 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



31 




IN LAVENDER, BLUE AND VIOLET— MARSHAL FRY 




IN VIOLET, DEEP AND LIGHT BLUE— MARSHAL FRY 



32 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




PORCH TEA SET— LILLIAN C. SMITH 

Lavender Wedgewood — English ware. Inspiration for design from cross stitch design in old sampler. Colors, Florentine Blue, 
Blue Green, Dull pink. Bamboo tray colored in enamel to match china. Linen center piece darker blue linen with 
crocheted edge and insertion to harmonize with china. Six napkins, blue linen, shade between china and tray cloth with 
darker blue crocheted edge and small design in cross stitch. 




CUSTARD SET, CONENORE GELEBEN WARE— ALICE M. HURD 




TWO SETS— NINA HATFIELD 
Left — Done in violet and lavender. Right — Buff ground with orange, yellow and black decoration. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



33 




IN BLACK AND YELLOW— MISS ANNA E. FITCH 




CHILD'S BREAD AND MILK SET— MARGUERITE CAMERON 

Border of bird motif in cross stitch effect, dove in old blue with touches of rose color. Rose linen cloth, cross stitch motif 

in blue and white. 



34 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHAFING DISH SERVICE DESIGNED FROM INDIAN COLLECTION IN MUSEUM— ESTHER A. COSTER 



with yellow strips while the napkins were yellow with black 
strips sewed on at right angles in the corner. The center dec- 
orations were four yellow vases holding red orange thistles. 
The candlesticks were pewter with yellow candles. 

A chafing dish service designed from the Indian collection 
in the Museum was contributed by Esther A. Coster. The 
tribe name was on each article and no designs were duplicated. 
The work showed a great deal of study and the possibilities 
of Indian art as a basis for modern design. 



A delicate and beautifully executed salad set of a light 
blue octagon shaped ware was displayed by Marguerite Cam- 
eron. It was decorated in a conventionalized design of deeper 
blue and yellow and placed on fine ecru linen mats with deli- 
cate drawn work borders. Miss Cameron also contributed a 
child's bread and milk set with a border in a cross stitch design 
done in old blue with touches of rose. The tray cloth was of 
coarse rose colored linen with the cross stitch motif in blue 
and white. Another charming child's set was exhibited by 




YELLOW JAPANESE WARE— MRS. FITCH 

Decoration in black enamel with touches of Rhodian red and green enamel. Black linen with band of yellow, napkins yellow 
linen with black. Flowers in vases orange thistles, candlesticks in silver lustre, candles yellow. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



35 




TEA SET— MISS DALMORE 
Deep blue with design in green, soft yellow and rose. Outline in black. 




NINA HATFIELD 

Flower bowl on crackled ware with decoration in red, green and purple. Pitcher of Capri ware in pinkish lavender with 
primitive decoration in blue and deeper lavender. Considered by Marshal Fry to be the best piece in exhibition. 



36 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




CHILD'S SET, BLACK CAT MOTIF— MARY E. HARRISON 

Done in black, bright red and green. Cloth of coarse natural colored linen with corners embroidered with same motif 

in cross stitch. 




OCTAGON SALAD SET— MARGUERITE A. CAMERON 

Dull pale blue china with decoration in deeper blue and yellowish rose. Fine ecru linen place doilies and runners with a 

fine drawn work insertion. 




DELFT BLUE DECORATION ON WHITE CHINA— SARAH A. C. DRAEGERT 

Ecru linen cloth with crocheted border of deep blue. Ecru napkins with monograrn in blue cross stitch. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



37 




BREAKFAST SET— ANNIE S. TARDY 




BREAKFAST SET— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

The motive used in decorating this breakfast set, is a little bunch of old fashion flowers. The design is carried out in brilliant 

enamels except the little oblong dots which are gold slightly raised. The effect of the little bunch 

of bright enamel flowers on the creamy Belleek Porcelain is charming. 



38 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BLACK, WHITE AND GREEN ON TAN MATS EDGED WITH GREEN— GEORGIA PIERCE UNGER 



Mary E. Harrison. It was done with a black cat motif en- 
livened by bands of bright red and green. The tray cover 
and bib were of crash with black cats embroidered in the cor- 
ners. 

A fresh and most appetizing breakfast set was decorated 
in pastel shades of blue greens and yellow by Annie S. Tardy 
and shown on a dazzling white tray. Sarah A. Draegert's 
set in Delft blue and white was designed with a great deal of 
thought for the shape of the china and ecru napkins with a well 
designed monogram in blue cross stitch were an additional 
feature of interest. Another commendable breakfast set was 
Anna A. Kipp's. It was decorated with a simple border of a 
substantial pink and placed on a white enameled tray covered 
with an exquisite pink linen cloth which must have gone through 
many dippings until its delightful color was evolved. The 
napkins were of the same pink with self toned crocheted edges. 



A berry set by Mrs. O'Hara executed in bright red and 
green and displayed on a red lacquer tray was a refreshing 
note on one of the tables and was especially admired by one 
art critic who singled it out from the exhibition. 

Alice M. Hurd's custard set was unique and its design and 
execution showed a feeling for form and consistency. It was 
an ordinary kitchen ware with a simple design in blue, black 
and rose. The cups rested on doilies of coarse tan linen cover- 
ing black earthenware plates. 

Two glass cases at the end of the room contained single 
pieces of a decorative nature. Mrs. O'Hara contributed 
several exquisite bowls and vases. One biscuit colored bowl 
outlined in black was a masterpiece of simple and original 
design. Her beautiful work in brilliant enamels is too well 
known to need description and lends class and distinction to 
any exhibition. Elizabeth Libby, Albert Heckman, Marion 




CARD TABLE SERVICE— ESTHER A. COSTER 



Dull yellow ground. Austrian Peasant motifs in Yellow Green, Orange, Dark Yellow Brown, and Blue Green. Linen doilies 
of brown with coarse buttonholes in colors of china. Napkins of light tan with colored embroidery. 

Wooden tray of natural color. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



39 




AFTER DINNER COFFEE SET— ALMA P. KRAFT 
Light green background with deep blue figure. Crash cloth with green linen border. 




PEASANT SET ON OLD ITALIAN CHINA— FRANCES WHITE WILCOX 

Small irregular blue and green decoration with stiff little suggestive bunches of flowers. Natural color linen cloth with 

wide filet crocheted insertion. 



40 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



Strong Thornton, Frances Wilcox and Charlotte Palmero also 
contributed decorative pieces. 

A large glass case stood in the main corridor outside of 
the exhibition room which contained some excellent examples 
of Clara Wakeman's delightful and colorful orange lustre ware. 

Miss Elizabeth Cary, writing of this exhibition for the 
New York Times, has described it as the last word in the Art of 
Exhibition. The large daily attendance, general interest 
which it has attracted, and the luring back to the "ranks" of 
several excellent keramic workers who had felt the restraint 
and lack of development of the old order, all testifies to its 
general appreciation and its permanent contribution to Keramic 
Art in this country. 

TABLE DECORATION 

Jetta Elders 

THERE are probably few women who do not love the mere 
touch of fine table linen. Perhaps some ancestress of 
old, who spun and wove and bore in her heart the joy of her 
craft, has passed the love of it on to us. There is some subtle 
fascination which wakes at its touch, and few women there be 
who do not respond to it. It has come gradually to ceramists, 
that their field has been a very restricted one. With this rea- 
lization has come the desire to reach out for something broader. 



The most natural step was in the direction of interior decora- 
tion, especially that branch of it which serves as a background 
to ceramics, in which the question of proper table linen looms 
large. A great field has opened up along this line, and a fresh 
impetus given to many workers who have been quick to grasp 
the opportunity thus offered. The immediate and enthusias- 
tic recognition of this movement as a splendid step forward, 
on the part of interior decoration and architects, has great 
significance. 

This problem of the proper relation of ceramics and table 
decoration, has been worked out in some of the most fascinat- 
ing ways. After one recovers from the first shock of seeing 
colored linens used on the table, the idea grows on one. 
The possibilities are simply unlimited, and it can easily be 
seen that the "individual" note is quickly sounded. Perhaps 
the first obstacle the average worker will run up against, will 
be the amount of time required in doing the needlework neces- 
sary in working out these schemes. And also the lack of time 
is a serious handicap. The thought uppermost in planning 
must be that of simplicity. If a design is so elaborate as to 
prove a burden before the pieces are completed, don't do it. 
One would probably hate it before it was done, and never be 
happy with it after. On the other hand, a design that can 
be carried through without weariness, has a joy about it which 
grows in the making, and will always have that spirit about it. 




CELADON CHINA WITH PINK MOTIF— MRS. FREEMAN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



41 




TEA SET — Blue and white with touch of rose on deep blue linen cloth. 




Bowl of orange, vermillion, green blue and black. 




Bonbon dish — Grey, rose, blue and black. 

Bowl on stand — Blue, vermillion, green and black. 

Bowl — Biscuit color and black. 



DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 




VASE 
Gray crackle, orange, vermillion and black decoration. 



42 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




JANET LAW 
Bird design in blue, rose and green. White enamel tray with deep blue linen cloth and napkins. 



If one has not yet adjusted oneself to lavender napkins and 
purple doilies, there is much to be accomplished with the na- 
tural or putty colored linens, or the warm creams, buff's, an 
tans, with colored embroideries or crochet. 

There are several simple ways in which the beginner may 
plan a set. All are familiar with the Japanese Seji ware, with 
its lovely green and its high glaze. Many good shapes are to 
be found in this pretty ware, which is sold in most large de- 
partment stores and china shops. The silvery grey of the 
Russian crash makes an admirable background for it. A 
paler shade of grey thread may be used with this. Try the 
china against pure white and then against the grey and any 
doubts you may have will vanish. The white seems hard and 
cold, while the grey is soft and charming and delights the eye. 
In planning a table for six, a very simple and effective way is 
to have a runner extending the length of the table, the ends 
serving as place mats. With this, use two oblong mats of the 



linen, on each side. It is no longer considered in entirely good 
taste to have the several doilies formerly used at each place. 
A far more sensible idea is that of the oblong table mat, which 
is large enough to hold a plate, cup and saucer, bread and butter 
plate, and the glass for water, together with the necessary silver. 
One thus does away with the fussiness of numerous small 
doilies. In planning this, it is wise to confine the decoration 
to the ends of the mat. Avoid the perfectly commonplace 
manner in which such things are ordinarily treated. A sim- 
ple narrow hem which may be quickly and neatly done, is far 
more satisfactory than the laborious one of elaborate embroidery 
Such a simple hem, with a row of Italian hemstitch or simple 
bands of satin stitch on the ends of the runner and table mats, 
has great charm and beauty. Or, the entire hem may be fin- 
ished with a crocheted edge, consisting of single crochet stitch 
with a picot at every tenth stitch. This is a most serviceable 
edge and has the advantage of being very quickly and easily 




IN BRILLIANT ENAMELS— ELIZABETH LIBBY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



43 




LORENA WILSON 




BOWLS— ALMA KRAFT 




ANNA ASHER KIPP 

Breakfast set in white and pink. Large white wooden tray 
with pink linen cloth and pink linen napkins with crocheted edge. 



MARION STRONG THORNTON 

Vase of Belleek— Manchu blue, Rhodian red, pale yellow, 
grey green 

Bowl — Japanese crackcle, sage green, grey green, old Chin- 
ese pink, pale yellow, black outlines. 




CORNELIA P. NELSON 
Dinner plates in black and gold. 



44 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Berry set — Red and green on red lacquer tray. 

done. It may be carried out in a contrasting color, a soft grey 
blue on the grey linen making a charming set. Yellow on grey 
is an interesting combination. The principle of fine space 
division is applied all through this problem of table linens. 

As one would study the width and proportion of bands 
and their relation to the plate rim in working out a problem 
in ceramics, so also is the placing of bands and other decora- 
tion on table linen carefully considered and tested by the 
same rules. Another manner in which runners, napkins and 
place-mats may be decorated is by the use of appliqued bands 
of contrasting color. These may be stitched on by machine> 
the labor involved being trifling. A set of linens to be used 
with Chelsea ware may be carried out in white linen, with ap- 
pliqued bands of bluish lavender, the initials worked in cross 
stitch in white on the lavender. In buying linens for this work 
choose the soft finish rather than the harsh wiry varieties. 
Especially is this to be remembered when planning nakpins. 
The quality of the thread used is to be considered, whether it 
shall be coarse or fine, as the weave of the linen may suggest. 
One would not care to put infinite time and patience into a 
thing which will not launder well. All of these things must be 
thought of and planned for. Once started along this new path, 
all sorts of suggestions and ideas will come crowding in on the 
enthusiastic worker. One will find oneself haunting the de- 
partment stores, op the hunt for beautiful linens and new and 
interesting sorts of threads. Even the humble notion counter, 
supplies its bit in the general scheme. Once the "microbe" 
has lodged, it will surely "get" you. 

It is a regrettable fact that the way of advancement in this 
beautiful art-craft of ours has had to be fought step by step 
all along the way. There is the amateur who has persistently 
refused to study and is content to offend every law of good 
decoration in china painting, because she can sell it. And the 
woman of wealth sadly minus taste, who alas! would rather 
have a dinner set painted (one can't say decorated) with black 




berries and lots "of gold." One is the outcome of the other, 
I suppose. But happily, there is a group of earnest enthusias- 
tic workers who are leading the way for the rest. Always 
giving of themselves, their time and energy, for the advance- 
ment of the many. From such workers much may be hoped 
for the future success of American ceramics. 




ALICE M. HURD 

Bowl, blue, green and scarlet. 

Grey Vase, light and dark blue decoration. 



FRANCES WHITE WILCOX 

Bowl and plates in primitive design executed in yellow and 
blue on coarse ware. 




MRS. T. F. HATFIELD 
Lamp on tan crackle black parrots and orange, green and violet. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



K. E. CHERRY 
Colors and Enamels 

Six Very Fine New Enamels 



Mulberry 
Purple Grey 
Lavender 



Half Vials Half Vials 

18c. Meadow Green - 18c. 

- 22c. Peacock Green - 18c. 

20c. Blue Green - - 18c. 



TRY THEM 



The new greens have been prepared in answer to several 

requests for darker greens than we had 

in our former list 



Send for Complete Price List of 

Cherry Standard and Dusting Colors and Enamels 

The Robineau Pottery, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



If you want "FAVORITE" CHINA. Write me! 

Here are a few more items at reasonable prices. 
Bread and Butter Plates 5 inches. 10c each. 

Rim Plates 10 " $4.00 per dozen. 

Shallow Coupe Plates JH*9^;Hi," $3.50 per dozen. 




Celery Tray 

No. 3378 

65c 



Celery Boat 

No. 3389 

$1.00 

Add Postage 
NO CHINA CATALOGUE ISSUED. 

Refer to March, April and May Keramic Studio for 
other shapes heretofore advertised. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUT- 
LINING INK, 25c and 50c Postpaid. 

WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " ' 

Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 

JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy BIk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




Bargain Sale of Studies will 
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Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.00 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

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By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in Keramic Studio. 

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FRUIT BOOK - 
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Each complete in one volume: Postpaid. 

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Premium No. 9 Again! 

A still better offer for the old subscribers — Read carefully ! 

Many people are disappointed because we did not continue longer 
our offer of Premium No. 9. W re to make 

this offer again, EXPIRING JULY 1ST. 
PREMIUM No. 9 consists of twelve assorted back numbers of 
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for a new name accompanied by $4.00. If an old subscriber 
wishes to take advantage of this, and send on the name of a friend 
together with her own subscription and enclosure of $8.00, she 
may take her choice of several valuable premiums, described on 
Premium List as No. 2, 5, 9 or 10, and this in addition to Premium 
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for renewals. We give premiums only for riei 
we consider as new an order from one wh ubscribed 

since July 1910. 

Send postal for Premium List if you haven't a copy. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 






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H. L. BRIDWELL 
MARY L. BRIGHAM 
MARGARET CAMERON 
ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 
KATHRYN E. CHERRY 
ALICE W, DONALDSON 
MABEL EMERY 
MARION L. FOSDICK 
LENA E. HANSCOM 
ETHEL NAUBERT HAMILTON 
ALBERT W. HECKMAN 
MAY B. HOELSCHER 
NELLIE G. LEYMAN 
FLORENCE McCRAY 
MRS. F. G McGAUGHY 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
KATHERINE LINDSEY PERKINS 
NELL SHERROD 
W. K. TITZE 
MARIE WITWER 
M. H. WATKEYS 
M. A* YEICH 



AUG. MCMXVI Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR THE POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



Themtirecontentsof this Magazine are cohered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF AUGUST, 1916 



Editorial 

Beginners' Corner 

Fruit Set 

Little Things to Make 

Satsuma Box 

Nut Bowl, Acorns 

Salad Bowl 

Lunch Set 

Plate 

Pitcher 

Bon Bon Dish, Nasturtium Design 

Bon Bon Dish, Wild Geranium Design 

Design Units for Dinner Set 

Dinner Set, Orange Blossom Motif 

Hard China Tea Caddy 

Covered Box , 

Water Pitcher 

Vase, Rhododendron Motif 

Answers to Correspondents 

Pitcher 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Tea Tile, Wild Geese 



Kathryn E. Cherry 

M. A. Yeich 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara 

May B. Hoelscher 

Ethel Naubert Hamilton 

Albert W. Heckman 

Florence McCray 

H. L. Bridwell 

Nell Sherrod 

Nell Sherrod 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

W. K. Titze 

Katherine Lindsey Perkins 

Margaret Cameron 

Katherine Lindsey Perkins 

Nellie G. Leyman 

Mary L. Brigham 
Anita Gray Chandler 
Lena E. Hanscom 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Salad or Fruit Set 

Detail Drawing 

Blue Poppy Vase 

Plate, Cup, Saucer and Bowl, Orange Blossom 

Nasturtium 

Wild Morning Glory 

Satsuma Box 

Plate, Cup and Saucer (Color Supplement) 

Nasturtiums (Color Supplement) 



Kathryn E. Cherry 
Alice W. Donaldson 
Mrs. F. C McGaughy 
Marie Witwer 
Marion L. Fosdick 
P. H. Watkeys 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Mabel Emery 
M. H. Watkeys 



Page 

45 
45 
46-47 
48 
49 
49 
• 50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
54 
54 
55 
56 
56 
56 
57 
58 
59 
59 
60 



25 
26 
27 
28-29 
30 
31 
32 
32 
32 



t€ 



THE OLD RELIABLE HzEHil FITCH KILNS 



* 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 StM 14 z 12 in... $30.00 

No. 3 Site 16 x 19 to.„ 40.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



Gas Kiln 2 sixes 



Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes 



[ No. 1 Six* JO x 12 in. .315.00 

\ No. 2 Size 16 x 12 in..- 20.00 

No. 3 Stx« 16 x 15 in. 25.00 

I No. 4 Six* 18 x 26 in.....„ 50.00 



<e 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Springfield, Ohio 



S> 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




NASTURTIUMS— M. H. WATKEYS 
See Naturalistic Section, page 32, for treatment 



AUGUST 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



Vol. XVIII, No. 4. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



August 1916 




HE following letter is of interest to 
Keramic Clubs. There will proba- 
bly be various opinions on the sub- 
ject. It is, of course, important that 
in large cities there be annually exhi- 
bitions of crafts in which good work 
in china decoration is admitted by 
the side of other crafts. But it also 
seems to us, as it does to our corres- 
pondent, that Keramic Clubs should 
be as much as possible confined to keramic work and have their 
own special exhibitions of keramics exclusively. This would 
not prevent the members from submitting their work to the 
more general exhibitions of crafts, such as the Chicago Art Insti- 
tute annual exhibition and others which are open to all. More 
can be learned in a club by specializing on one line of study, 
than by taking a little of everything. And so too, keramic 
workers can learn more from an exhibit devoted exclusively 
to keramics, in which it is possible to compare one style of de- 
sign with another, one worker's technique with that of another, 
one color scheme with another. It seems that a Keramic Club 
should be devoted to keramics. A general art club is another 
problem altogether. 

I wish the Editor would sound a warning to Keramic Clubs against ad- 
mitting all branches (oil, water-color, tapestry, hand-colored calendars and 
the various crafts and embroideries) to their exhibitions. The result, with 
certain Clubs, has been discussion, conflicting interests and aims, and a source 
of misunderstanding among the members. Our Club numbers nearly fifty, 
but less than half are really Keramic workers. In a city the size of ours the 
field is broad enough to admit a Club of china decorators without any out- 
side lines. This might not apply to small towns, but I know of other Clubs 
that made the same mistake in organizing and they have been hampered 
ever since with these members who are always trying to elbow the keramics 
to the background, so to speak. — A. W. G. 
H H 

This letter from one of Keramic Studio's good friends will 
be interesting to those who are beginning to study table dec- 
oration. 

I have studied in one or two schools where "interior decorating" was 
taught and so far as I am able to observe the students and sometimes the in- 
structors are a bit "sweeping" in their ideas. They generally advocate throw- 
ing away everything one possesses and refitting entirely. And some of the 
substitutes they suggest are far uglier than many of the old things. It seems 
to me that a bit of judicious "weeding out" with care and taste in selecting 
wall-coverings, a few bits of furniture, upholsteries and rugs would put most 
middle-class American interiors into rather harmonious, pleasing livableness 
and comfort. And I think the same way about the table. I saw Mr. Fry's 
exhibition in New York and 1 am more than enthusiastic over its beauty, nov- 
elty and the pleasant emotions which it excites. But, of course, it is rather 
expensive to buy new tables, linens and dishes, so I think one can use some of 
the things one has, plus a few brains and a small outlay of money and arrange 
an artistic lunch or tea table, at one's own house. I tried it and will send de- 
scription of the result. 

Our china (of course!) is a Haviland dinner set. Every American family 
has one, just as we once proudly exhibited a Rogers group and a "set" of plush 
furniture. Well, ours has a light blue, naturalistic decoration, so I have added 
a bouillon set and a chop-dish that is appropriate and yet a fairly good match. 
We had a coat-of-arms in the house which an English genealogist assured me 
was authentic and we had a right to use. It happened to be in "azure", "or" 
and "argent" so I adapted it to my china, making the "azure" a bit pale and 
using much white-gold (in place of silver) and just the small amount of Roman 
that the motif required. So when I planned my luncheon the white, blue, 
(Continued on page 60) 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 



LITTLE THINGS TO TEACH BEGGINERS 

Mrs. G. L. Schuetz. 

I BELIEVE most teachers try to teach beginners the idea 
of suitable design, color harmony, etc., but I know from 
experience that many are prone to overlook the little things 
which so often cause disastrous results. 

For instance: How many there are who never learned 
that gold cannot be applied over unfired color or dirty or 
dusty china. I have had teachers (?) who did not know that 
the handles and edges must be cleaned before the gold is 
applied and "wondered why their gold would not burnish". 

But now for the "Beginners" and as in other lines, there 
are "Beginners and Beginners", in other words, "Beginners" 
who have "begun". I know I have often taken too much 
for granted when some one has had a "few lessons", but as 
I grow older in the work, I find that the best plan is to "Begin 
at the beginning", altho it sometimes requires considerable 
tact to do so. 

One of the first things to emphasize is cleanliness; clean 
china, clean pads, clean turpentine and a clean palette. 

How often the tinting will not pad out smoothly and we 
find that the china was not perfectly clean, or the tinting looks 
"muddy" which shows the pad was not perfectly clean. Clean 
the china by washing it, or clean with alcohol; keep your silk 
for pads soft and clean; the silks used for pads should always 
be washed, if new, before using and after they have been used, 
soak in turpentine and wash out with soap and water, just as 
you would wash anything else; they must be dried without 
ironing, by pasting while wet on a flat surface, or they may be 
ironed out after drying, but they should be free from all wrinkles 
before using. 

Then the proper grinding of the colors; no matter whose 
mixing medium is used, remember that the paints must be 
ground thoroughly and be of the right consistency. Have you 
ever tried to paint with "oily and grainy" paints? 

No rule can be given as to amount of color and oil to use 
as some colors absorb more oil; but one point to remember is 
that you cannot grind your paints well if you are using too much 
oil— just enough to make them smooth like thick cream or cake 
batter is a rather good rule to follow. 

Then another thing that seems important to me, is the 
systematic arrangement of the palette. Always have a place 
for each color and always place that color in its place. Much 
time and annoyance can be saved if one knows just where to 
reach for a certain color each time. Would one ever learn to 
play the piano if they had to stop and look for the right key 
each time — well, not very successfully. 

Then comes the proper handling of brushes. One of our 
rules is: Always clean your brush before using and always 
clean it before laying it down. 

Keep the brush soft and for any purpose, except where lines 

or accented touches are to be made, the brush should be kept 

broad and flat; taking the paint up by rubbing into the color 

instead of out, as most people have a habit of doing. Charge 

(Continued on page 57) 



46 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





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47 



SALAD BOWL (Page 50) 

Ethel Naubert Hamilton 

FIRST Fire — Outline design in Black. Leaves are Olive 
Green. Apples are Blood Red. Pineapples are Yellow- 
Brown. Pears are Ivory and Peach Blossom. Grapes are 
Copenhagen Blue, Warm Grey and Violet (equal parts). Plums 
are two-thirds Ruby and one-third Black. Pomegranate is 
Violet of Iron with Lemon Yellow inside. Flowers are in soft 
light shades of Baby Blue, Rose, Pompadour, Violet of Iron, 
Yellow Brown, Lemon Yellow, Violet and Ivory. Rim, base 
and small oblong are Roman Gold. Large oblong is Apple 
Green, and space back of it is Violet of Iron. 

Second Fire — Tint entire bowl in Satsuma; wipe out de- 
sign and shade all leaves, fruits and flowers in Brown Green. 
Strengthen all colors in the panels, and put on second coat of 
Gold. This bowl is used for fruit salad, but may be used for 
a few tall flowers if a Japanese flower holder is placed in the 
bottom. 



LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE (Page 48) 

M. A. Yeich 

THE designs developed from the monkey-flower are here 
applied to an egg cup, stamp box, two trays, open sugar 
bowl or bon-bon and two medallions or buttons. Use black for 
lines and paint or tint design in several tones of blue, leaving 
the paths around the design white. 

If another treatment is desired, paint with the natural 
colors of the plant. For the flowers use light and dark Violet. 
The center is Yellow with a white edge, dotted with Brown 
on the white part and with Yellow Brown on the yellow part. 
The tube of the flower is Violet shading to white below. Paint 
leaves and stems with Moss Green, Night Green and Brown 
Green. Pearl Grey, Satsuma or Ivory may be used for the 
ground. 




SALAD OR FRUIT SET— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



OIL all the small berries and dust with Mauve, the dark spot 
in the center of them is painted with Carnation and a 
little Blood Red. Leaves are oiled and dusted with Bright 
Green. Baskets and all grey bands are oiled and dusted with 



Florentine Green. All of the darkest tone in the design is 
Green Gold. For the second fire the entire background sur- 
face is tinted with a very light wash of Lemon Yellow and a 
little Apple Green. 



48 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE, MONKEY FLOWER MOTIF— M. A. YEICH (Treatment page 47) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



49 







SATSUMA BOX— DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
Enamels used: Pink No. 1, Pink No. 2, Light Yellow, Pale Lilac, Old Egyptian Turquoise, Manchu Blue, Green No. 1. 




NUT BOWL, ACORNS— MAY B. HOELSCHER 



THIRST Firing— Outline in Black, lay gold. Second Fire— 
■T Paint leaves in soft green, veins Hair Brown toned. 
Lower part of acorn lighter brown of same shade. Upper 
band on bowl Old Blue, also triangle in geometrical form, cen- 
ter band of upright form Old Blue. 

Second Firing— Lay gold again in top bands, third band 



Dull Green Gold on outer upright. Base of bowl Dull Green, 
next band Gold. Third lighter green, fourth Gold. Small 
squares in gold band Old Blue with oblongs Hair Brown. 
Background Cream. 

Third Firing — Same as second. All designs should be of 
soft shades, 



50 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



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KERAMIC STUDIO 



51 










LUNCH SET^ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



TO be carried out in three colors as in the illustration. Mix 
two parts Pearl Grey with one part Olive Green and 
paint in all the green parts. For the orange parts mix two 



parts Albert Yellow, one part Yellow Brown and one-half 
part Carnation. 'The background is a thin wash of Lemon 
Yellow. 



52 KERAMIC STUDIO 

PITCHER (Page 53) 

H. L Bridwell 

OIL grey tones in bird and the grey outline around the de- 
sign back of it and dust with 3 parts Water Green No. 2 
and 1 part Bright Green. Oil the dark space back of bird and 
dust with Grey Blue. Oil the grey tone under the feet and the 
grey tone around spout and dust with Glaze for Green. Oil 
the wing of bird and dust with 2 parts Dove Grey and y % part 



Dark Grey and the breast and head with 2 parts Ivory Glaze, 
1 part Pearl Grey, y 2 part Albert Yellow. The eye and feet 
are dusted with Coffee Brown and a little Yellow Red. Dark 
tone on handle and around the top is Water Green No. 2. 

Second fire— Oil all over the light background and dust 
with 2 parts Pearl Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze and a little Albert 
Yellow. 




PLATE— FLORENCE McCRAY 



OUTLINE flowers and leaves with Dark Grey, and a little 
Black. Stamens are of the outline color. The dark 
lines and the dots back of flowers are Gold. 

Second fire — Paint flowers with a thin wash of Deep Blue 



Green. Leaves with Apple Green and a little Shading Green, 
and the wide grey band with Banding Blue, Copenhagen Blue 
and a little Dark Grey, or it may be oiled and dusted with Grey 
Blue. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



53 




PITCHER— H. L. BRIDWELL 



(Treatment page 52) 



54 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BON BON DISH, NASTURTIUM DESIGN 

Nell Sherrod 



BON BON DISH, WILD GERANIUM DESIGN 

Nell Sherrod 



OIL all darkest tones and dust with Water Lily Green and |^ IL tne li S ht S^ tones in flowers and bud and dust with 

a touch of Dark Grey. Oil the middle grey tones and ^^ 2 parts Cameo and 1 part 4 Peach Blossom. The dark 

dust with Florentine Green. tone is jGold. Second Fire — Oil all background surface and 

Oil the remaining tone and dust with Yellow for Dusting dust with 1 part Pearl Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze, 1-5 part Dark 

and a little Pearl Grey. Grey. Retouch Gold. 




DESIGN UNITS FOR DINNER SET— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

Trace design in, outline the Black, then put the gold on dark parts of design then fire. Second Fire — Oil the dark parts of 

design and dust with Cherry's Bright Green then oil the light parts of design and dust with Yellow for Dusting. 

This oiling must be put on with a very dry brush, do not have the oil looking very oily. 

Then clean edges, go over the gold again. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



55 





SALAD OR TEA PLATE 



SERVICE PLkTE 




DINNER PLATE 




DINNER SET, ORANGE BLOSSOM MOTIF— W. K. TITZE 

All lines, dark bands, outline of blossoms and buds are Green Gold. Buds and flowers in White Gold. light green bands, 

equal parts Grey Green Glaze and Waterloo Glaze. Leaves (all darker greens), 

add 2 parts Florentine Green to mixture of Light Green bands. 



56 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




U Edge of Plate 



2. Edge of Saucer 



3. Center of Plate 



4. For Sides of Sugar and Creamer 5. For Cup 

OUTLINES FOR LUNCH SET (Page 51) 





COVERED BOX 

Margaret Cameron 
j^IRST Fire — Paint design in Roman Gold. Second Fire- 
Tint box Old Ivory. Third Fire — Same as'for first. 



S*** '-V 




HARD CHINA TEA CADDY 

Katherine Lindsey Perkins 



WATER PITCHER 

Katherine Lindsey Perkins 



BACKGROUND Grey Blue No. 57. Leaves Dark Green 
No. 55. Flowers, top row, Blue No. 58, next darker, 
grey. Dark squares, Old Yellow No. 2, Flowers Pink Blue Nos. 58 and 40 mixed. Narrow band Rose Pink No. 28. 
No. 4. Leaves Brown Green No. 3. Darkest band Dark Blue "No. 40. Small point Pink No. 28. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



57 



(Continued from page 45) 
the brush with the color, then rub the brush lightly on the 
palette, thus softening the color toward the end of the brush; 
for soft, smooth work cannot be done with the color just on the 
tip of the brush. 

Now while I have given no advice on "How to paint china" 
and much that I have said may be regarded as already under- 
stood, still I know that all these little things help to make a 
success of "China Painting". 

H H 

HELPFUL HINTS 

Sadie E. Allen. 

IF you are beginning to teach, or teaching beginners, explain 
things simply, for I remember one of my first stumbling 
blocks was not being told that Roman gold came from the 
kiln dull, and had to "be rubbed with a glass burnisher to put 
on the finish. If I wished to do it on one firing I was told to 
put on a coat of gold, dry it hard in the oven, cool, and put on 
another. But it returned from the firing dull like yellow ochre; 
thinking the gold was too thin I repeated every task, the second 
and third time, with the same result of course until I had used 
up a whole book of gold on a tiny little handle which had to 
be turned to the wall as we thought in disgrace, although it had 
cost $1.30. 

Choose a flat dish like a tray or plate to begin on, wipe 
your dish over with turpentine, padding lightly and let it dry 
well, it will then mark clearly with an ordinary lead pencil or 
will make a clearer line with your tracing paper. If you are 
not where you can buy tracing paper, you can make a good clear 
paper by dipping a piece of thin paper in oil and drying. 

A piece of lead from an ordinary soft lead pencil rubbed 
over the back of your traced design, makes a much neater and 
less confusing line on the china than carbon paper. 

After getting the design on the china go over it neatly with 
India ink or color. India ink fires out and is used where you 
are not intending to retain a color outline on your design. You 
may then fill in your design with colors before firing, which 
should be done with a "square shader" brush for broad work, 
being careful to keep an even tone, going well up to, but not 
over the outlines. 

After outlining your design in color, take a pen knife 
and scratch off all little uneven places, for clear fine regular lines 
are necessary for beauty. 

Gold can be put up to, but not over unfired colors, and. 
when put over fired color use unfluxed Roman gold. Bright 
gold is good and economical for a first coat, but cannot be put 
as near unfired color as Roman gold, as it is apt to spread. 

Be very careful in thoroughly removing any spot or stain 
made by bright gold, or a purple mark will develop in firing. 

If wishing a plain dark ground for a small surface, it is not 
necessary to pad the colors but give about three coats with a 
broad square shader as evenly as possible, with not too heavy a 
coat first or last, the middle one can be the strongest. 

Dusted color, however, is preferable for deep tones. 

Colors on palette can be freshened up and used over if 
kept from dust, but it is best to take out less, and fresh each day, 
as dust in color fires in and leaves a mark, but dust on color 
fires out. 

Good clean brushes are very necessary for good work, wash 
them in turpentine and wipe to a good point before putting away. 

Keep separate brushes for both Roman and Bright gold 
which do not need to be washed, but warming them before us- 
ing will soften them up. Warming the gold will also soften it 
up when hard or inclined to curdle. 

Always use perfectly clean turpentine for Rcn.an gold. 

Get a regular outlining brush for your outlining work. 



■ 







^) 



^\ 



*Yv 



JkkiBi 



VASE, RHODODENDRON MOTIF 

Nellie G. Ley man 

r I ^HE outline and black bands are painted with Black and 
-*- also the dots in the flowers. 'Second Fire — Oil leaves 
and dust with 1 part Florentine, 1 part Ivory Glaze. Oil 
flowers and dust with 1 part Deep Ivory, 1 part Ivory Glaze. 
Oil over entire background and dust with Cameo. 

Third Fire — Paint over the darker tones in flowers with 
Yellow Brown and a very little Dark Grey and also over the 
dark panel back of flowers. The large background space in 
lower part of vase and the band at the top is painted with a 
very thin wash of Blood Red. 

i? 1? 

EXHIBITION NOTE 

In the account of the Greater New York Society Exhibit 
in July issue, a mistake was made on pages 36 and 37. The 
china in Delft blue attributed to Sarah A. C. Draegert was by 
Annie S. Tardy, and the breakfast set attributed to Annie S. 
Tardy was by Sarah A. C. Draegert. 



5& 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

Mrs. E. C. L. — What caused a Seji tea-pot to crackle all over in the kiln in 
the second fire? 

It may have had too hot a fire or it may have been a defective piece. 

Carmen — Can you tell me how the frosted effect is done in etched work to 
make it look even, also how to do the matt effect to make it look like the Pickard 
china, is there any special matts to be used? 

1. If you mean the frosted effect in the background the acid does that; 
in etching it leaves the china rough and keeps the gold from burnishing giv- 
ing it a frosted appearance. 

We do not know what effect you refer to in the Pickard china but if it is 
a matt color you can buy matt colors and' apply them by oiling and dusting 
the color on as you do any other color. 

./. P. H. — Please tell me how to paint on silk or satin. If oil how to use 
paint so no oil stain is on edge of design and if water color how to get as good ef- 
fect as oil colors. 

Water colors are used and you may mix them with white water color to 
get the desired effect. The Tempera Water Colors would work very success- 
fully. 

C. B. — Will you kindly give me a good formula for making a medium or 
tinting oil. One that can be used for tinting, grounding and mixing powder 
colors. 



2. — What is the difference between ground lay and grounding when referring 
to putting in a background'! 

1. You cannot use the same oil for all purposes, it is necessary to use a 
special oil for grounding or dry dusting. The mixing of these oils is a secret 
with the manufacturers. For tinting and mixing paints some people use 
copaiba and lavender oil and a little clove oil. 

2. There is no difference, it is also called dry dusting, 

Z. E. B. — I wish to lake off some color with hydrofluoric acid and I notice 
that in October '15 issue of Keramic. Studio you advise using asphaltum on the 
part not to be taken off. Kindly tell me where to procure the asphaltum and hoiv 
to use it. 

2. — Will you advise me what shade of blue to use for the background of a vase 
to match the enclosed sample of wall paper"? 

3 — What color do you use to gel a rich purple background similar to Deep 
Violet of Gold, dusted on'? 

1 . You will find the asphaltum at a hardware store or paint store. Paint 
it on with a brush, it should be painted on rather heavy. If it becomes too 
gummy thin with turpentine. 

2. If you wish a dark shade use Water Blue and if a light shade use 
Grey Blue and a very little Water Blue. 

3. Deep Violet of Gold is not usually a rich purple but is more of a red- 
dish tone, if that is what you wish use Fry's Roman Purple. If you wish a 
rich Royal Purple use Mrs. Cherry's Mauve. 




CUP AND SAUCER—ELSIE W. TALLY 
Done on Seji. Leaves f Old Chinese Blue, § white Enamel. Flower in Persian Red and Dull Yellow and green at center. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



59 




PITCHER 

Mary L. Brigham 
/^VIL the grey tones in the flowers and dust with Grey Blue. 
V-J Oil leaves and stems and dust with Florentine Green. 
All of the darkest tones and also the grey lines in borders are 
Green Gold. 

Second Fire— Paint the grey tone in the borders and on 
handle and the lip of pitcher with Dark Grey and a little Band- 
ing Blue. Retouch the Gold. 

NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler. 

"Nights," by Elizabeth Robbins Pennell. Lippincott, 
$2.00. Mrs. Pennell has written in sprightly fashion of even- 
ings in London, Paris, Rome and Venice, where enthusiastic 
artists, critics and writers came to her rooms to talk over the 
work of the day. The reader will meet such acquaintances as 
Whistler, the Pre-Raphaelites, Beardsley and Stevenson at her 
little salons. The whole is a spontaneous picture of the artistic 
people of the last century. 

"Philosophy of Painting," by Ralcy Husted Bell. Put- 
nam, $1.25. Dr. Bell devotes himself partly to the explana- 
tion of the various kinds of art-critics, and partly to the discus- 
sion of emotionalism in art. There is also an enlightening chap- 
ter on pre-historic painting. The author predicts that after 
the great war, woman will more than ever take her place in the 
front rank of art. "The painter must express then as now the 
finer things which life feels, hopes, holds; the mind's noblest 
conceptions, love's most beautiful dreams, the music-like har- 
monies of the emotions, and all the longing fancies possible to 
their technic, that shall throng the spacious dome of time." 

Each of these books will make profitable summer reading, 
provided one has room to sandwich them in between the light 
layers of vacation fiction. 



ANSWERS TO V. P. S. 

Here's a lady china painter, one who's studied every day 
And who now is teaching pupils what she knows; 
She began by painting china in the real old-fashioned way, 
Chose a plate and in the centre put a rose. 

Then she painted sprays of flowers, little pansies scattered round, 
Or a modest bunch of daisies on one side, 

But she saw the fashion changing and she knew if she were bound 
To succeed, she'd have to paddle with the tide. 

There were paints for Royal Worcester used with tiny lines of gold 
And the Doulton with its scrolls and dots of paste. 
Though a trifle rough to handle, and the paste would likely chip, 
Yet 't was handsome, and 't was sure to suit some taste. 

Then the style for painting Dresden, dainty flowers old and quaint, 
The designs from our grandmothers' foreign ware 
And a style just then attractive, so she bought the Dresden paint 
And she made the flowers and figures with great care. 

As she was a portrait painter, soon on china she did heads 
Very lovely if 't were hung upon the line 

Of the eye, where one could view it, but most china as we know 
Must be used upon the table where we dine. 

It would seem so very funny to put gravy on a face, 

Or a chop upon a cherub or a rose, 

If 't were used her friends would take a fork and try to clear the place 

To study the design and how it goes. 

But it did not satisfy her, so she started painting fruit 
Realistic, but the background sombre shades 
Leaves would merge into the shadows, unimportant. Colors suit. 
Here the highlight. Perfect values, all the grades. 

Yet it made her tired to see it — spots of darkness in the room. 
On the table it looked heavy, coarse and cheap, 
So she went to painting monochrome — in sepia or Delft, 
But she gave it all away, 't was not to keep. 

Then she started with enamel — little dots upon the gold, 

Or she floated it and made some posies bright. 

And she dusted on the dai-ker shades, or glazed the tints, I'm told, 

With so much of flux the reds were "out of sight." 

She was weary with enamels, hard and soft, and lustres, too, 

So for weeks she painted roses large and small. 

She could shut her eyes and paint them, lovely things. But then she gi-ew 

Just so very sick and tired to see them all. 

"All my girls are painting roses, dresser sets and table ware, 
All the china's turning pink," this teacher sighed. 
"I must take a long vacation, have a change, go anywhere, 
And I ought to see some foreign work beside." 

So she went abroad and saw the Sevres china and Meissea, 
And the porcelain of Derby and of France; 
And the charming work of Japanese and Italy's designs 
And the best that German painters could advance, i 

She absorbed all she was able, then she hurried home to work 

She had seen so much she had a misty mind, 

But she knew that time would clear it and with study and with thought, 

She'd paint something that was lasting and refined. 

So she set her pupils drawing. All must make their own designs. 
They made mostly little borders, neat and chaste, 
Just a simple touch of color here and there between the lines, 
But it pleased all, for it showed the varied taste. 

These designs when placed on china made the article superb, 

And the pupils all improved so rapidly 

For they did it all themselves, which made the teacher glow with pride. 

Their exhibits all were beautiful to see. 

They took Keramic Studio, that lovely magazine, 

And studied all the photographs and so 

They knew what others painted in the different States and towns, 

Inspiration from Keramic Studio. 

And this teacher read the magazine whose influence is good 
And she left the "naturalistic" in the past, 
For she felt so very happy in the kind of work she loved 
And she said "I'm sure conventional will last". 

ANNA R. REEVES. 



60 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



(Continued from page 45) 
silver and gold made a delicate but harmonious color scheme. As linens are 
very scarce just now I used Cluny-trimmed doilies and center piece that were 
given me one Christmas and that are ample enough to about cover the entire 
table surface for a small luncheon. Time pressed, so I purchased a set of 
plain white linen, hemstitched napkins and embroidered the armorial design 
in colors in one corner (black had to be substituted for the silver but was very 
effective). I used a silver bowl and four small brass bowls (with glass flower 
holders from the ten-cent store inside them) for my flowers, which were blue 
ragged-robins and white sweet peas, bought two china fruit dishes and silvered 
them, putting artificial grapes in pale yellow and black, lemons and small 
pumpkins (which we pretended were meant for Japanese persimmons) into 
them. As I had excluded red from the scheme I also excluded tomatoes and 
strawberries from the salad and dessert courses. Lettuce and celery were 
substituted in the former and pineapple ices with light-colored cake in the 



latter. It seems to me that natural fruit always makes a lovely decoration, 
but I am tired of the sight of oranges and bananas, and the yellow and black 
raspberries, which would have fitted into my plan admirably, were not ripe. 
I omitted candles as they seem to me decidedly out of place in a country house 
at lunch time. 

I think anyone with a little ingenuity could adapt her materials in this 
way, and after she had tried it on the table could perhaps see ways to improve 
the rest of the house, but of course this is only a suggestion. 

LAURA B. MECUTCHEN 
H H 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces 
that an examination will be held in Washington on August 8th 
to fill a vacancy in the Bureau of Standards at Pittsburgh for 
associate ceramic chemist, qualified in glass technology, for 
men only. The salary will be from $2000 to $2500. 




TEA TILE, WILD GEESE— LENA E. HANSCOM 

The outlines, border and wild geese are dusted in with Ivory Black. The background is Copenhagen Greywith a very little 
Ivory Black. The moon and throats of the geese are Primrose Yellow and the clouds are Orange. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



. 




AUGUST 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER-mabel emry 
See Naturalistic Section, page 32, for treatment 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



K. E. CHERRY 

China 
Colors and Enamels 



The demand for Cherry Colors and especially for 
Enamels is growing steadily. 



On request of several china decorators, we have made 
arrangements to have an 

ENAMEL TILE 

showing the whole series of Cherry Enamels fired. 
The price of the tile will be $2.00 postpaid. 



Send for Complete Price List of Cherry Colors and Enamels 

AND BUY YOUR FALL SUPPLY BEFORE 

THE PRICE GOES UP. 



The Robineau Pottery, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



If you want "FAVORITE" CHINA. Write me! 

Here are a few more items at reasonable prices. 
Bread and Butter Plates 5 inches. 10c each. 

Rim Plates 10 " $4.00 per dozen. 

Shallow Coupe Plates $y 2 " $3.50 per dozen. 




Celery Tray 

No. 3378 

65c 



Celery Boat 

No. 3389 

$1.00 

Add Postage 
NO CHINA CATALOGUE ISSUED. 

Refer to March, April and May Keramic Studio for 
other shapes heretofore advertised. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUT- 
LINING INK. 25c and 50c Postpaid. 

WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 

JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




Bargain Sale of Studies will 
continue until further notice. 



SEND FOR LIST I 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.00 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potter by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in Keramic Studio. 

Paper Cover $1.50 post paid Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid 

Send card for information and prospectus. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 

When writing to advertisers 



A Few Class Room and Other Books 

SOILED COVERS but otherwise perfect 
Regular Price $3.00 each 



CLASS ROOM No. 1 
CLASS ROOM No. 2 
CLASS ROOM No. 3 
CLASS ROOM No. 4 
FRUIT BOOK - 
ROSE BOOK 



V 



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KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



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Will be Advanced 

About 10% 
On October 1st. 

Contracts accepted for not more than one year at the present 
rates if made previous to above date. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 

please mention this magazine 






Keramic Studio Books 

Each complete in one. volume: Postpaid. 

Grand Feu Ceramics.. % 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room 

No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain. Class Room No. 2 .... 3.00 
Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing. Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain. 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 

Book of Cups and Sauc< 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Mai 2.50 

SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 

One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 6.50 

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Eight Books, including 4 'Book of Cups and Saucers" 19.50 

The Nine Books Complete and 1 year's sub. 21.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers and year's subscription 

to Keramic Studio 5.00 

Little Things to Make and year's subscription to 

Keramic Studio 6.00 

KERAMIC STUDIO MAGAZINE, $4.00 PER YEAR 



Premium No. 9 Again! 

A still better offer lor the old subscribers— Read carefully ! 
Many people are disappointed because we did not continue longer 
our offer of Premium No. 9. We have decided therefore to make 
this offer again, EXPIRING JULY 1ST. 
PREMIUM No. 9 consists of twelve assorted back numbers of 
Keramic Studio published previous to May, 1913, and sent only 
for a new name accompanied by $4.00. If an old subscriber 
wishes to take advantage of this, and send on the name of a friend 
together with her own subscription and enclosure of $8.00, she 
may take her choice of several valuable premiums, described on 
Premium List as No, 2, 5, 9 or 10, and this in addition to Premium 
No. 9 going to the new subscriber. We do not give premiums 
for renewals. We give premiums only for new business, but 
we consider as new an order from one who has not subscribed 
since July 1910. 
Send postal for Premium List if you haven't a copy. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



\y 



:/?-' 



>. t r : 6" 



CONTRIBUTORS 

JESS \RD 

MARY LILLIAN BER 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

IDA NOWELS COCHRANE 

MRS, F. H. HANNEMAN 

ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

SARA E. KING 

F. C McGAUGHY 

ADELINE MORE 

M. G. MYERS 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

MARY F. OVERBECK 

RA B. OVERLY 
ELMA S. RITTEB 
ELISE TALLY 

MARGARET HUNTINGTON WAT* 
FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 
F. R. WEISSKOPF 
YEICH 



Ionian Insti* 



' 



(* AUG 



SEPT. MCMXVI Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A MOUTH LY MAGAZINE FOR THE POTTER AMD DECORATOR- 



The entirecontentsof this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF SEPTEMBER, 1916 



Editorial 

Plate 

Dresser Set 

Little Things to Make, Fruit of the Dogwood 

Satsuma Vase, Enamels 

Tea Set, Bird Design 

Service Plate 

Sugar and Creamer, Rose Panels 

One Fire Design for Luncheon Set 

Service Plate, Rose Panels 

Berry Bowl, Blackberry Blossom 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Answers to Correspondents 

Conventional Motifs 

Tile, Orchids 



Elma S. Ritter 

Albert W. Heckman 

M. A. Yeich 

Elise Tally 

Dorothea "Warren O'Hara 

Mrs. F, H. Hanneman 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Leah H. Rodman 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

Sarah E. King 

Anita Gray Chandler 

F. R. Weisskopf 
Laura B. Overly 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Vase (Color Supplement) 

Bouillon Cup, Saucer, Plate, Etc. (Supplement) 

Rose Border and Panels 

Game Plate 

Six Plate Designs 

Lady Slipper 

Bowl, Blackberries 

Poppies 

Butterfly Weed 

Prairie on Fire 

Enamel Design for Bowl 



Mary F. Overbeck 

Albert W. Heckman 

M. G. Myers 

Adeline More 

Adeline More 

Margaret Huntington Watkeys 

F. C. McGaughy 

Mary Lillian Berry 

M. A. Yeich 

Florence Wyman Whitson 

Ida Nowels Cochrane 



Page 
61 
62 
63 

64 
65 
66-67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
71 
72 
72 
73 
74 



33 

33 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
40 



<6 di 

THE OLD RELIABLE HzEHH FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 Site 14 x 12 to $30.00 

No. 3 Site t6xi9 to 40.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



Gas Kiln 2 sizes 



<e 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



/ No. i SU« JO x 12 ia..„.„.„.$I5.00 

Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes No ' 2 Stt * U x ,2 ^ — ™ M 

No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in. „„. 25.00 

1 No. 4 Size 18 x 26 fau.„.„ 50.00 

Springfield, Ohio 



sr 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




VASE— MARY F. OVERBECK 
See Naturalistic Section, page 40, for treatment 



SEPTEM BER 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB CO. 



Vol. XVIII, No. 5. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



September 1916 




UBLISHERS in this country are fac- 
ing a difficult situation at present. 
The rapid increase in the cost of pa- 
per, of engraving and all other pub- 
»| v »mwmm«w «^ y/,m lishing expenses has to be met in 
II j|)|';tf|!ji;iS^jw!B' some wa Y- Probabilities are that 
before long there will be a general 
increase in the subscription and ad- 
vertisement rates. We do not like 
to increase the subscription price of 
Keramic Studio and will do it only in case of absolute necessity. 
But it may become a necessity, and our subscribers should 
realize that every business must adjust itself to the rapidly 
increasing cost of living. China decorators must themselves 
offset the growing cost of all the materials they use and of their 
personal needs by a raise in the price of their work. 

One should not forget that we started Keramic Studio sev- 
enteen years ago at $3.50 and raised the price to $4 in 1906. 
In the first years the Magazine contained little more than half 
what it contains now. Two years ago we further increased its 
contents by giving two color studies instead of one. In the 
last ten years, as everybody knows and feels, the cost of living 
has increased enormously, nearly doubled. Keramic Studio 
at $5 a year would be cheaper today than it was at $3.50 in the 
early years or at $4 in 1906. 

However, there is one way in which the possibility of a 
raise of the subscription price could be avoided, and that is by 
an increase of the circulation. It is well known that the bigger 
the circulation of a magazine is, the lower is the cost of each 
copy. This allows publications of very large circulation to put 
their subscription price at extremely low figures. A special 
magazine like Keramic Studio, with a necessarily limited circu- 
lation, cannot be cheap, but the fact remains that an increase 
of a few thousand in the subscription list would help a good 
deal and would solve the problem which confronts us in present 
conditions, and would make unnecessary a raise of price. 

Keramic Studio is read and studied every month by more 
than 20,000 decorators. It ought to have at least 10,000 sub- 
scribers, but at no time in its existence has the subscription list 
exceeded 6,000, and we have before in our editorials called atten- 
tion to the cause of this fainthearted support, notwithstanding 
the undeniable success of the Magazine. It is that a great 
many decorators who need Keramic Studio do not subscribe 
because they find a copy of it either at their public library or in 
their teacher's studio. 

We offer club rates to teachers to encourage them to take 
subscriptions among their pupils and friends, but we constantly 
receive letters saying "I cannot persuade my pupils to subscribe 
as they can use my copy of the Magazine in the studio. " Now 
this is human nature, and we do not very well see what can be 
done about it. But is there no way for a teacher to persuade 
those pupils that if they need and use the Magazine they owe 
to it their loyal support? It is not only a moral obligation, it 
is for their own interest, for a magazine must continue to 
pay its expenses and the living expenses of its publishers. 
In the present serious situation of a growing increase in 
the cost of publication, which can be met only in one of two 



ways — an increase of circulation or a raise in the subscription 
price, — we again urge our friends and all teachers to do their 
best to secure more subscriptions for us. The price will not be 
raised this fall, the club rates will remain the same, but we do 
not know what will have to be done in 1917. Our decision will 
depend on the way subscriptions come in between now and Jan- 
uary 1st. 

» » 
All the answers to V. S. P. having been published, we would 
like to hear from our readers as to which letter they found most 
interesting and convincing. If too busy to write, will you just 
send the name of your choice on a postal card, it will be greatly 
appreciated. Also write on the card what special feature you 
would like in the Magazine for its improvement. 

« « 

A new arrival on the editorial desk is "Colour, a Handbook 
of the Theory of Colour," by George H. Hurst, F. C. S. 11 
color plates, 72 illustrations. Scott, Greenwood & Son, 
London. The book treats its subject very fully, both theoreti- 
cally and as applied to design, and should be valuable to the stu- 
dent designer. 

BEGINNERS' CORNER 



CARE OF MATERIALS 

Jessie Bard. 
TN order to make a success of any line of art work one should 
■*- express oneself in one's work. The style of work that 
pleases best, is the one in which you feel the artist has put real 
enjoyment, but can you imagine him happy over his work if he 
is obliged to labor with brushes that are in a bad condition, or 
with paints that are hard and dirty, making it almost impossi- 
ble to produce clear snappy color? 

Most beginners do not understand about the care of mate, 
rials or are careless in regard to it. If you are using a palette 
for your colors, before putting it away, wipe off all the linty 
waste color that has accumulated, and close the palette to keep 
the dust out. A drop or two of clove oil placed on the palette 
before closing will keep the colors more moist. Before using 
the colors again rub them up with a little turpentine to soften 
them and place them back on the palette as neatly as you can. 

Most beginners use too much oil in the colors, causing 
them to run into each other on the palette and also to gather 
lint in the work. The color should be thick enough to stand 
up in a heap and should not spread out at all. 

Brushes should always be cleaned before putting them 
away and left in a good condition, the hairs should be kept to- 
gether and the tips shaped so they will not be bent. Painting 
and oiling brushes should be cleaned in turpentine, India ink 
brushes in water, gold brushes in alcohol. Lustre brushes should 
be cleaned thoroughly in turpentine and then in alcohol, and 
then they should be brushed back and forth against the hand 
until they are dry and fluffy. 

A cup of turpentine should be on the table before the worker 
to clean the brushes; the paint will settle at the bottom of the 



62 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



cup and the next morning the clean turpentine should be poured 
off and used again. This should be poured off carefully so the 
paint at the bottom is not mixed up with it. 

A large mouthed bottle filled with alcohol should be kept 
for cleaning gold brushes and kept well corked, thus saving the 
gold which can be refined when enough is collected. 

The best device for keeping brushes in good condition is to 



take a piece of cardboard a little longer than the brushes and 
lace a piece of elastic about an eighth of an inch wide across the 
cardboard at the top and bottom, leaving it looped enough to 
slip the brushes in. This prevents the tip of the brush from 
becoming bent as so often happens when the brush is laid away 
in a box, and also prevents the loss of brushes. As many brush- 
es as one wishes may be placed on one board. 




PLATE— ELMA S. RITTER 



OUTLINE with Black. Outer grey bands and inner dark 
band are Green Gold, omit, the outline on these. 
Second Fire — Oil leaves and grey band joining the design 
and dust with Florentine Green. Oil small circles under flowers 



and dust with 1 Cameo and 1 Peach Blossom. Flowers are 
Cameo. The wide dark band and remaining dark spaces are 
1 Dove Grey and 1 Pearl Grey. Retouch Gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



63 




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KERAMIC STUDIO 




LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE, FRUIT OF THE DOGWOOD— M. A. YEICH 



OBLONG BOX 

OUTLINE and all darkest tone is Gold. Second Fire- 
Oil the dark grey tone in flower and the leaves at the 
side and the large grey space on bottom of box and dust with 
Grey Blue (the oil should be applied very thin). Oil the light 
grey space in flower and the stem on the box and dust with 2 
parts Cameo and 1 part Peach Blossom. Oil all the background 
and dust with 2 Glaze for Blue and 3 Ivory Glaze. 
SALT SHAKER 
Outline and all darkest tones in Green Gold. Second 
Fire — Oil leaves and stems and dust with Florentine Green. 



PUFF BOX 

Outline with Black. Second Fire — Oil flower and dust 
with Coffee Brown. Oil leaves and stems and dust with 
2 parts Dove Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze and a little Flor- 
entine Green. Oil dark band and handle and dust with 1 part 
Coffee Brown, I part Dark Grey and 3 parts Ivory Glaze. 
Oil the 2 large panels under the flowers and the one on the lid 
and the background space outside of design and the space at 
the bottom of box and dust with 4 parts Ivory Glaze, 1 part 
Dark Grey and a very small pinch of Albert Yellow. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



65 



TEA SET, BIRD DESIGN (Pages 66-67) 

Dorothea Warren 0' Hara 

JAPANESE ware of soft orange yellow color. As this ware 
requires rather light fire, soft enamels were used. For 
bird and center of the three dark flowers, Old Chinese Blue 
Enamel was used. Rhodian Red Enamel was used for the 
outside of three dark flowers. The stems and leaves and also 
the center of the three round flowers just above the birds 
wing, are done in Bright Sea Green. For the outside of the 
three round flowers, use Old Yellow Enamel. For bands and 
knobs use Old Chinese Enamel. 

FOR SEDJI WARE OR WHITE CHINA 
Bird, bands, knobs and center of three dark flowers, Old 
Blue Enamel. For the outside of three dark flowers, Old Pink 



Enamel. Leaves, stems and center of three round flowers 
above the wing, River Green Enamel. For outside of three 
round flowers, Greenish Yellow Enamel. 

*• *c 

DRESSER SET (Page 63) 

Albert W. Heckman 

THIS may be carried out in flat enamels with the broad 
grey bands of dusted color and the narrower ones of 
Green Gold. Color scheme to suit one's taste or the following 
treatment may be used. Paint in flowers with blue. Use 
Banding Blue, Violet No. 2 with a little Deep Blue Green. 
Dust the broad bands with Glaze for Blue and paint in the 
narrow ones with White Gold The little leaves are Moss Green. 




SATSUMA VASE, ENAMELS— ELSIE TALLY 



BLACK Outlines. Bands inclosing medallions in Gold, also 
in space in large medallion between flowers and leaves and 
in diamond shaped medallions in space between the darkest place 
nearest flower and dark outer wide line. Old Chinese Blue 
between leaves and medallion, and in diamond shaped medallion 



in darkest place nearest flower. Flowers § Old Chinese Pink, 
| Dull Yellow, ■§ White, Centers § Green No. 1, | Light Yellow, 
§ White. Belleek showing in all light .lines. Leaves in larger 
medallion, \ Old Chinese Blue, \ White and in diamond shaped 
medallion wide outer line. 



66 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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KERAMIC STUDIO 



69 




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SUGAR AND CREAMER, ROSE PANELS— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

Oil circles in design and dust with Water Green. Oil roses and dust with 1 Cameo and 1 Peach blossom. Paint dark centers 

with Blood Red and Pink or Rose. Paint grey tones and handles with Lemon Yellow, 

Yellow Brown and Dark Grey. Also dark tones are Green Gold. 



70 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



rHcr 





ONE FIRE DESIGN FOR LUNCHEON SET— LEAH H. RODMAN 

Oil the band at bottom of design and the two long upright bars and dust with Florentine Green. Oil the small square space 

and the horizontal bar between the two large spaces and dust with Mode, this should be oiled a little heavy. 

Oil remainder of spaces and the bands and dust with 1 part Mode and 1 Ivory Glaze. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



1\ 




SERVICE PLATE, ROSE PANELS— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

Oil leaves and buds and dust with. Water Lily Green. Oil light part of roses and dust with 3 parts Peach Blossom and 2 

parts Cameo. Paint centers of roses and buds with Blood Red and Pink or Rose. 

All dark bands and stems are Green Gold. 






'SS> 





BERRY BOWL, BLACKBERRY BLOSSOM— SARA E. KING 



Outline design either in Black or Gold. The bands, stems and 3 small grey spaces are Green Gold. Second Fire — Oil leaves 

and dust with 1 part Dove Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze, 1-5 part Dark Grey. Oil Blossoms and dust 

with 2 parts Cameo and 1 part Peach Blossom. Retouch Gold. 



72 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler 
"The Cathedrals of Great Britain," by P. H. Ditchfield, 
M. A., F. S. A. (E. P. Dutton & Co., $1.75). 

This is a reprint of a well known book giving descriptions 
that are at once instructive and interesting, of the cathedrals 
of England, Scotland and Wales. There are many artistic 
illustrations. 

"Stately Homes of California," by Porter Garnett. (Little, 
Brown & Co., $2.50). Mr. Garnett has pictured the homes 
and gardens of wealthy California residents. The illustrations 
are rich with color. 

"How to Study Pictures, by Charles H. Coffin. Century 
Co., $2.00. There are comparisons of famous pictures from 
Cimabue to Monet. The illustrations are cleverly arranged to 
make the text clearer. Anyone who has the least interest in 
pictures should read this book. 

*• -f 
CONVENTIONAL MOTIFS (Page 73) 

F. R. Weisskopf 
FIRST ROW 

LEFT Square— First Fire— Outline in Banding Blue. The 
large corner ferns are Gold. Second Fire— Go over Gold 
and fill in flower forms with enamel using Bright Green for 
the centers and the petals with alternating light and dark 
Blue. 

Middle Figure— First Fire— Stems, leaves, outer petals and 
outlines in Silver. Second Fire— Go over Silver and fill in 
flower forms with enamels. Yellow centers, darker part in 
Orange and petals in Grey Enamel. 

Right Square — First Fire — Paint in leaves (omitting out- 
line and stems and outlines of flower forms) with Grey Green. 
Second Fire — Tint over surface with a delicate coat of Ivory 
and clean out flowers. Fill in with Enamels as follows: berries, 
Pale Green Enamel with Black spots. Four petal flowers, 
Pompeian Red centers, Black circles and Bright Yellow petals. 
Round flowers, Black centers, Bright Green circles, next circle 
Bright Blue, and small scallops around in Black. 
SECOND ROW 

First Figure — Leaves, stems, outlines Yellow Brown, 
centers and squares Gold; square around centers Enamel 
Green; larger flowers Albert Yellow, smaller pale shade of 
same color. 

Center Figure — Outlines Black, leaves and stems Black 
Enamel, tall petals Yellow Enamel, dark part Black, round 
part Orange Enamels. 

Third Figure — Leaves Black Enamel, outlines of flowers, 
Black. Fill in flowers with bright shades of Enamels, using 
Blue, Green, Yellow and Red. 

THIRD ROW 

First Square — Leaves Dark Green Enamel, square flowers 
Deep Purple with Gold centers, round flowers Yellow Enamel 
with Orange centers. 

Second Square — Outline and lines Gold, dark part, 
Crimson Enamel, outer petals Grey Enamel, oval petals two 
shades of Green Enamel. 

Third Square — Stems and tendrils Black; leaves Dark 
Blue Enamel, berries Yellow Enamel. 

Fourth Square — Leaves Apple . Green; center of flowers 
Gold, light circle Bright Yellow, dark circle gold, petals Laven- 
der and outside lines Gold. 

Fifth Square — Outlines, tendrils and little oblong forms, 
Emerald Green, scalloped circle and other two dark parts of 
flower Dark Blue, remaining sections of flower Yellow and 
Orange. 



FOURTH ROW 



First Square— Outlines, circles and dots Gold; leaves 
Black Enamel, corner flowers Carmine with Black centers and 
Pale Carmine centers inside the Black. Large center flower 
Black center, Gold around this, petals in two shades of Purple 
Enamel, six petaled flowers same as corner flowers, other 
flowers Gold centers, Black next to it and petals Grey Enamel. 

Second Square— First Fire— Outline all forms with Band- 
ing Blue. Second Fire— Tint entire surface with Banding 
Blue and a little Grey ; clean out flower forms. Leaves and long 
ovals in flowers in Dark Blue Enamel, petals Gold with outer 
petals Bright Green, inner oval Orange and circle center left 
White. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

W. F. L. — Will you please tell me where I can, get the crackle ware for dec- 
orating? Also what kind of glass is used for silver deposit and decorating"! 

Almost all the dealers who handle white china carry the crackle ware or 
Satsuma. 

Any good quality of glass can be used and can be bought from a firm 
carrying china and glass ware or tableware, there is no firm making a specialty 
of it. 

G. P. — Hoiv do you fire glass? 

2. What kind of glass ware can one paint and where buy it? 

3. Should I scald good china when washing it, I've been advised not to. 

1. Glass is fired the same as china but requires very little heat. Turn 
off the heat as soon as you see a glow in the kiln and then open the door to keep 
the heat from increasing. 

2. Answer to W. F. L. in this column will answer this question. 

3. Yes, you may scald the china it should not affect it if it is well fired. 
B S. — Kindly tell us what paints to use to paint on Ivory? 

Water colors are used. It may be necessary to add a little gum arabic 
to the color 

M. M. W. — I etched a grape fruit dish and did not etch deep enough as the 
design does not show plainly.. Would you advise the use of lustres over the 
gold in the design? I would dislike to take the gold off the background and do 
the etching again on account of loss of gold or do you think it advisable? 

2. Will you tell me hoiv to shade with lustres? I have a study for a vase 
that has yellow lustre at the top, then shaded into light green, then dark green, then 
olive at base. 

3. / have a charcoal kiln and in last firing had a stack of twelve plates with 
1-8 inch rim of liquid bright gold. When taken from kiln the gold on one side 
of nearly all of the plates looked as if it had been fired off just a light yellow brown 
or cream color and could be rubbed off. The other side ivas alright. There were 
little spots and specks where it seemed to have popped off between the bad and good 
side of plates. There were a great many other pieces in kiln that came out beauti- 
fully so I did not think they were underfired. I did not put that on ami the 
fault may have been in that as the lady is a beginner. Do you think it m<:> . <•, .,. 
to use the test cones in these kilns and ought the kiln to be out of edl drafts? 

4. Will you suggest a study suitable for a tobacco jar that is tall and straight 
I have tried so many studies and none seem to suit the shape. 

5. Am sending a piece of broken china mug, will you please tell me. what 
color was used to get the purple background? Also please tell me if the design 
is stamped or hand painted? 

1. The lustre would separate the design more from the background. Of 
course it would be better to etch it but that depends on yourself whether you 
care to do it. 

2. Use a separate brush for each color and change quickly from one 
color to the next so the edges do not dry and leave a fine where you join when 
applying the lustre and then they may be padded to help the blending. 

Are you sure the plates were not in a cooler part of the kiln than the rest 
of the china, it sounds as though the damaged side must have been near the 
cool place? Although the trouble may be that the gold was applied too thin 
perhaps the lady made one brush full of gold do for the entire rim causing the 
last part to be thinner than the first. 

It is not necessary to use cones nor to keep the kiln from the dark unless 
it is a strong one. 

4. A medallion design or panel design will answer on an all over pattern. 
In May, 1916, magazine, page 5, in upper group the pitcher design on lower 
row could be adapted or the jar on the center row and also the jar in the lower 
group. 

5. The purple is probably Roman Purple, or American Beauty, or a 
Violet No. 1. Yes, it is hand painted. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



73 









CONVENTIONAL MOTIFS— F. R. WEISSKOPF 



(Treatment page 72) 



74 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




TILE, ORCHIDS— LAURA B. OVERLY 



OUTLINE flowers with Violet, leaves with Dark Green. 
Background, Black enamel. Orchids, Blue Violet enamel, 
adding 1-10 Rose enamel making Pink Violet. For dark 
markings in flowers add a very little Crimson Rose enamel 
with Pink Violet. For yellow markings, rich yellow enamel 
made by mixing Albert Yellow with white enamel. For light 
violet petals add White Pink with enamel. For light yellow 



petals use a soft yellow enamel made by mixing a tiny bit 
of Albert Yellow in White enamel. Vein violet petals with 
darker violet, light yellow petals with pale green enamels. 
For leaves use Gray Green Enamel No. 3 adding white enamel 
for lighter green. Outline flower and leaves with Pale Yellow 
enamel, same as yellow petals of flowers. I would suggest 
making test of all enamels, to get desired color, before using. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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K. E. CHERRY 

China 
Colors and Enamels 



The demand for Cherry Colors and especially for 
Enamels is growing steadily. 



On request of several china decorators, we have made 
arrangements to have an 

ENAMEL TILE 

showing the whole series of Cherry Enamels fired. 
The price of the tile will be $2.00 postpaid. 



Send for Complete Price List of Cherry Colors and Enamels 

AND BUY YOUR FALL SUPPLY BEFORE 

THE PRICE GOES UP. 



The Robineau Pottery, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



ATTENTION CHINA PAINTERS! 

THREE FREE LESSONS either by correspondence or in my studio 
given with this beautiful "Favorite" Chocolate Set of 7 pieces for $3.90 
provided all supplies are purchased of me, using "Coover's" Outlines 
or K. E. Cherry's Colors and Enamels, if desired. 

No china cata- 
logue issued, 

wr'te me if you 

wish 

other shapes. 



Refer to 

back numbers of 

Keramic Studio 

from April to 

date, 

for other shapes 

and prices. 
Add parcel post charges 
to your 

No. 6810 Price $1.50 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK, 
25c and 50c Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 

JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




REMITTANCES!!! ~m 



"We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft bat if check 
is more convenient add the fcost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.00 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in Keramic Studio. 

Paper Cover $1.50 post paid Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid 

Send card for information and prospectus. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 

When writing to advertisers 



A FEW BOOKS ! 

All the books with soiled covers are 
closed out except the 

ROSE BOOK 

of which we have a few left. 

These we will sell for 
$1.75 post paid, until sold out. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



ADVERTISING RATES 

Will be Advanced 

On October 1st. 
For new rates see page I 

Contracts accepted for not more than one year at the present 
rates if made previous to above date. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 

please mention this magazine 




Paper Lover $1.50 post paid 

id card for information and pi 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING C 





L* 



Jjjsonian insfj^ 



CONTRIBUTORS 

MRS. DANTE C. BABBITT 

JANE P. BAKER 

JESSIE HURD BLACK 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

KATHRYN E t CHERRY 

IDA NOWELLS COCHRANE 

H. FEWSMITH 

ESSIE FOLEY 

KATE CLARK GREENE, 

ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

F. H. HANNEMAN 

EDITH NAUBERT HAMILTON 

MRS. J. K. HEISMANN 

LENA E. HANSCOM 

SARA E. KING 

MRS. F. C McGAUGHY 

LILLIAN MILLER 

DORRIS DAWN MILLS 

ADELINE MORE 

ELISE W. TALLY 

FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 



SEP 291916 



4 



i /; Oflal Mus*^ 



OCT. MCIWXVI Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A IIOIiTHLY flAGfiZINE FOR THE POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



Theeatirecontentsof this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF OCTOBER, 1916 



Editorial 

Honey Jar and Plate, Fruit Motif 

Belleek Bowl in Enamel 

Dresser Set 

Design for Plate 

Milk Mag and Plate 

Satsuma Bowl in Enamels 

Dinner Set 

Soap Weed for Round Box Design 

Soap "Weed for Vase 

Satsuma Box in Enamels 

Design for Bowl 

Suggestion for Clover Motif 

Straight Border 

Border 



Sara E. King 
Elise W. Tally 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Jessie Hard Black 
Albert W. Heckman 
Edith Naabert Hamilton 
Lillian Miller 
Essie Foley 
Essie Foley 
Ida Nowells Cochrane 
Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt 
Lena E. Hanscom 
Jessie Hard Black 
Dorris Dawn Mills 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Fish Plate 

Forget -Me -Not Sugar Bowl, Cap and Spoon Tray 

Panel and Circular Designs 

Plate 

Two Plate Designs 

Candlesticks 

Snake Grass 

Plate, Rose Border 

Wild Flower 

New Art Books Worth Reading 

Gladioli (Color Supplement) 

Forsythia (Color Supplement) 



Adeline More 
Albert W. Heckman 
Mrs. J. K. Heismann 
F. H. Hannemann 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
Kate Clark Greene 
Adeline More 
Florence Wyman Whitson 
Anita Gray Chandler 
Jane P. Baker 
H. Fewsmith 



Page 

75 
76 
77 
78-79 
79 
80 
81 
81—84-85 
82 
83 
86 
86 
87 
87 
87 



41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
45 
46 
47 
48 
48 
48 
48 



<ff 



THE OLD RELIABLE H!h! FITCH KILNS 



% 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 StM 14 z 12 In $30.00 > 

No. 3 Stee 16 z 19 in 40.00 \ 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



Gas Kiln 2 sizes 



<e 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



/ No. I Size 10 x 12 in.....„ $15.00 

Charcoal Kiln 4 atees No ' 2 Siz * < 6 * l2 ** " 20 -°° 

No. 3 Sfcre 16 x 15 in „.. 25.00 

( No. 4 Size 18 x 26 in 50.00 

Springfield, Ohio 



* 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




GLADIOLI— JAN E P. BAKER. 
See Naturalistic Section, page 48, for treatment 



OCTOBER 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

S YRACU SE, N. Y. 




ran 



Vol. XVIII, No. 6. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



October 1916 




HE Publishers and Editor of Keramic 
Studio are still struggling with the 
problem of "making the punishment 
fit the crime" i.e.: making the income 
fit the outgo since the raise in all 
printing materials. We have several 
plans under consideration and hope 
to make a definite announcement 
in November. We are seriously 
considering publishing a separate 
Magazine for the painters of the naturalistic, not because of 
any increasing demand, as it is quite evident that naturalistic 
treatment of porcelain is on the wane, but because there is a 
large contingent of china painters who never have been or can 
be brought into the fold any other way. If the mountain will 
not come to Mahomet, the prophet must go to the mountain. 
If we should publish a china painter's Magazine for the natural- 
istic lovers' very own, we could give them the best obtainable 
semi-naturalistic designs and little by little the insidious spirit 
of design would creep in and one by one they would desert 
to Keramic Studio — which in the meantime we shall be using 
every effort to improve. We would be glad to hear from our 
readers on this suggestion. We are also planning several new 
departments for Keramic Studio — a page on table linens and 
furnishings — a page of club and studio notes are among the 
near probabilities. 



We find it more difficult than we expected to secure good 
articles on glass decoration. Several china decorators have 
successfully tried glass work, but consider that their work is 
too experimental and their experience too limited to enable 
them to write articles. Others who have studied in Europe 
do not think that they are familiar enough with Ameri- 
can materials. However we have been promised articles on 
work done with materials which are found on the American 
market and hope to be able to publish them before long. 

Good colors for glass decoration are advertised in Keramic 
Studio. The following firms turn out very good undecorated 
glass shapes: 

Red, pink, blue and green glass, fancy shapes: 

Westmoreland Specialty Co., Grapeville, Pa. 

Cambridge Glass Co., Cambridge, Ohio. 

Geo. Borgfeldt & Co., Irving Place and 16th St., New York. 
Table Glassware for gold decoration: 

Bryce Bros. Glass Co., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

United States Glass Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Fostoria Glass Co., Moundsville, W. Va. 

Central Glass Works, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Lamp Globes and Shades: 

Scandinavian Glass Manufacturing Co., Avant, Okla. 

In addition to these the firm of A. H. Heisey & Co., New- 
ark, Ohio, are, we think, selling at retail some excellent undec- 
orated shapes. Most of them however will probably not sell 
at retail but decorators who are interested should urge their 
dealers to make arrangements for lines of undecorated glass 
with the wholesalers or manufacturers. Dealers will take in- 
terest in this as soon as they see a demand for it. As we have 



ftsonian I 



explained before, the demand for decorated glass has increa 
very much in late years but so far all the work is done > 
mercially. There is room for good artistic work /^* , 

fa SEP 2 9 



Meanwhile we do not see why beginners' notes even hfoW/'o/jo/ MuS®^ 
people who are not experts and are experimenting would no 
be as interesting and valuable as articles by experts. There 
are no great mysteries about glass decoration, it is a question 
of practice. American materials and American methods will 
do. We just have in mind a letter from a subscriber received 
some time ago. This china decorator made experiments in 
her regular china kiln both in glass work and in pottery, 
with very successful results. It seems to us that the results 
of such experiments would make just as interesting reading 
as more expert articles, although articles by more experienced 
people will also be welcome in our columns and we hope to 
have them before long. 

Anyway this china decorator who was not afraid to try 
glass work and pottery in her china kiln shows the right spirit. 
That is the right way to get somewhere, and such an example 
is particularly encouraging at a time when there is a very un- 
fortunate tendency among china decorators to commercialize 
their work. The leaders are of course showing originality in 
design and fine workmanship and their work is more and more 
recognized in exhibitions. But what of the large number of 
copyists, who do not try to do some work of their own, do not 
learn to do original work because they do not try. To this 
unfortunate habit of copying has now been added decalcomania, 
a process which is exclusively commercial. It is true that these 
ready made designs may be used intelligently by transferring 
a motif here and there and leaving room for original treatment 
of the rest of the decoration. But it is a temptation to many 
to use transfers indiscriminately. These commercial processes 
save time and labor, but they throw your work into compe- 
tition with the product of factories where the production in 
large quantities reduces the price to a point which for the 
amateur china decorator would be the starving point. 

Amateur china decoration is an occupation and a liveli- 
hood for thousands of women in this country. Its foundation 
rests on the still widespread idea that "hand painted" china is 
something much better than the factory china. As long as 
this idea prevails the public will be willing to pay more for 
handwork than for commercial work, and the idea is justified 
as long as amateur china decoration remains individual, original 
art work, different from the commercial. With their unfor- 
tunate tendency to copy somebody else's work, are not amateur 
china decorators risking to kill the goose that lays the golden egg? 

Why then, you ask, does Keramic Studio publish designs 
for copying if they are not to be copied? You will note that 
we said copyists, who do not try to do some work of their own. 
We publish designs of varying degrees of merit, as inspiration, 
suggestion. We expect that beginners will at first simply 
copy, then adapt, by degrees learn to take parts or motifs from 
the design and make new arrangements and finally make their 
own motifs and designs, in this way they may arrive at develop- 
ing latent talent for design and do original work, and, if it is 
in them, rise to the front rank of ceramic decoration. 



76 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



DESIGN FOR BOWL (Page 86) 

Mrs. Dante C. Babbitt 
\ BELLEEK bowl will be the best selection. Tint all 
-**• over with Warren's Grey Green glaze and fire. Divide 
into three parts, draw design accurately for one part and care- 
fully trace balance. If not sure of one's self it is now best to 
lightly go over tracing with ink. Then outline in equal parts 
Grey for Flesh and Black. Do not fire until you know your 
outlining is perfect. The flowers are white enamel toned ever 
so slightly with Yellow Brown. The center, markings and 
pistil of flower are Pale Lavender. Mix a small quantity a 
trifle deeper in tone to shade the little seed like center. The 
stems, bud forms and all bands and lines are Warren's Green 
enamel No. 2 and one-half Relief White with a touch of Brown 
Green for more depth. The diamond shapes in border are 



Lavender and larger half circles of the green enamel mixture. 
The beauty of this simple design with its quiet coloring is de- 
pending chiefly upon the care and accuracy of the execution. 



DRESSER SET (Page 79) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

OIL the roses and dust with Cameo 2 parts, Peach Blossom 
2 parts. The green is Florentine Green. Paint in the daisies 
with Deep Blue Green and Banding Blue, the centers are Yel- 
low Brown. Then paint in the Gold. 

Second Fire — Paint in the background with Yellow Brown 
Grey Yellow and Grey for Flesh. Then go over the gold again' 




HONEY JAR AND PLATE, FRUIT MOTIF— SARA E. KING 



FIRST Fire — Outline in Deep Violet. Second Fire— Tint small inset, thin wash of Roman Gold. Third Fire — Shade 

back-ground in Oriental Ivory. Before going further, peaches with light tone of Blood Red; accent grapes with Royal 

clean up bands and design carefully. Paint peaches Albert Purple; and go over gold parts. 
Yellow; leaves, Leaf Green; grapes, Violet; bands, handle and 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



77 




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79 




DESIGN FOR PLATE— JESSIE HURD BLACK 

Large leaf and bud Grey Green. Flower, Orange. Three dots in center Blue. Stems Red Violet. 






CANDLES riCK PIN TRAY 

DRESSER SET-KATHRYN E. CHERRY (Treatment page 76) 



80 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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81 




SATSUMA BOWL IN ENAMELS— ETHEL NAUBERT HAMILTON 



jT^IRST Fire— Outline design in Black. Rim with Roman or 
*- Green Gold. Six repeats were used on the bowl. Second 
Fire — In this design the regular painting colors were added to 
the Soft Enamel, care being taken to keep all colors very light, 
pastel tones except the Yellow Brown in the large flower at the 
right. Middle flower is Baby Blue. Flower at the left is Peach 



Blossom. Blossom under the pink one and the oval figures are 
Violet. Remaining blossoms are Ivory, Yellow Brown, Peach 
Blossom, Baby Blue, and the two apples are Yellow Brown. 
Put on second Gold rim. A third fire may be necessary to darken 
the colors. 




DINNER SET, CUP AND SAUCER— LILLIAN MILLER 



(Treatment page 85) 



82 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SOAP WEED FOR ROUND BOX DESIGN—ESSIE FOLEY 



OUTLINE heavily with Banding Blue and a little Copen- 
hagen Blue. Stems and bands are of the same. Second 
fire — Paint flowers with Deep Blue Green and a little Turquoise 
or Sea Green. The large buds are Violet and a little Copen- 
hagen Blue. Dark space around center flower and the remain- 
ing small dark spaces are Yellow Green, a little Shading Green 



and Brown Green. Center of large flower is Yellow Brown and 
a little Yellow Red. Background is Dark Grey and a little 
Banding Blue. 

For small motifs outline and all dark sections are Gold and 
for second fire flowers are oiled and dusted with Grey Blue and 
buds with Cameo and a little Peach Blossom. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



83 




SOAP WEED FOR VASE— ESSIE FOLEY 



r T^0 be carried out in enamels on Belleek, Satsuma or Nippon 
J- ware. Outlines in Black if desired or the outline may be 
omitted. The five large buds at top of design and the five at 
lower stem are 1 part Wistaria and 2 parts White Enamel. The 
three upper petals on the open flowers are 1 Warmest Pink 
and 1 White. All the lower petals and the small ones at top of 



vase are Warmest Pink. Dark centers in flowers are Orange 
No. 3. Stems are 2 parts Silver Grey, 1 part Warm Grey. 
Caps of buds are Meadow Green. Bands are Blue Green. 
If Nippon ware is used tint background with Albert Yellow 
and Dark Grey to give an ivory tint. 



84 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





DINNER SET— LILLIAN MILLER 



(Treatment page 85) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



85 






DINNER SET— LILLIAN MILLER 



OIL dark turn over part of leaf, the cap of the bud and the 
veining and dust with Water Lily Green. The lines in 
flowers and the bands are Green Gold. Center of large flower 
is painted with Albert Yellow. 



Second Fire — Oil grey tone under the leaves and the verti- 
cal bar and dust with 1 part Mode and 2 parts Ivory Glaze. 
Oil leaves and dust with Glaze for Green. Retouch the Gold. 



86 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SATSUMA BOX IN ENAMELS— IDA NOWELLS COCHRANE 



T ARGE flower petals Sky Blue, Center of flower Apple 
-L' Green. Large circle in center Corn Flower Yellow. Small 
circles Austrian Red. Flower toward top of design Corn Flower 
Yellow. Small oval in flower Apple Green. Small flower at 
lower side of design Coral with Sky Blue center. All leaves 



and stems Apple Green. Conventional figures surrounding 
flowers and leaves in Green Gold. Background and edge of 
lid Black paint. Upper and lower edge of border Black and 
flower same as center of large flower on lid. All colors used 
are enamels except Black. 




DESIGN FOR BOWL— MRS. DANTE C. BABBITT 



(Treatment page 76) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



87 




No. 1 



SUGGESTIONSjFOR CONVENTIONAL CLOVER MOTIF 

Lena E. Hans com 

NO. 1. — Leaves, Olive Green. Half moon in center, Yellow 
Brown, very faint. Stems, Yellow Brown with a very 
little Blood Red. Outline, Copenhagen Grey. 

No. 2. — Heart of flower, Peach Blossom. Petals, Peach 
Blossom and a little Ruby. Leaves, Moss Green and Copenha- 
gen Grey; half moons in leaf, Moss Green, very faint. Stems, 
Apple Green. Outline, Shading Green and Blood Red for blos- 
soms. 

No. 3. — Stems and half moons, Moss Green and a little 
Royal Green. Leaf forms, Shading Green. Flower form, Yel- 
low Brown, with a little Blood Red. Outline, Black. 





No. 2 



No. 3 




STRAIGHT BORDER— JESSIE HURD BLACK 

Use same treatment as for plate (page 79) 



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BORDER— DORRIS DAWN MILLS 



Tint Dark Olive Bronze Green Matt and dust. Clean out design and border on a line with roses and squares 

and fill in with Gold. Roses, use Blood Red dark. Centers, Banding Blue. Bars and long lines, 

Shading Green. Squares, Apple Green. Outline in Black. 



88 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



F. WEBER & CO.'S 

"SPHINX" KERAMIC GOLD 

In all shades, of finest quality, packed, celluloid covered, in dust-proof 
and air tight attractive boxes. 

BEAUTIFUL RICH GOLD COLOR AFTER FIRING 

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9x13 at $1.25 each 
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CAMEL'S HAIR QUILL BRUSHES OF FINEST FRENCH MAKE 
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Uf U ITp P H I N A for decorating can be had at our branch house, 
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for catalogue. HAND BOOKS ON CHINA PAINTING 

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Naturalistic Designs 

A complete assortment of China Medallions, Melal Brooches 
and Hat Pins for decorating 

CHINA MEDALLIONS CUFF BUTTONS DRESS BUTTONS 

Dresden Porcelain Plates in all sizes and shapes 

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Outfits and Materials for the new facinating 

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New 1915 Catalogue, Vol. 400 K mailed on request. 



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Celluloid Birds, Frogs and Fish 
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SEE CATALOGUE 41 

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COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 

Mfg. Klondike Gold Agents Limoges Colors 



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Wright, Tyndale & van Roden 

INCORPORATED 
1212 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



A NEW BOOK "Design and The Decoration of Porcelain" 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist, from her articles Published in "Keramic Studio" • 
Paper Cover $1.50 post paid Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid Send card for information and prospectus 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FORSYTHIA-h. fewsmith. 
See Naturalistic Section, page 48, for treatment 



OCTOBER 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



K. E. CHERRY 

China 
Colors and Enamels 



The demand for Cherry Colors and especially for 
Enamels is growing steadily. 



On request of several china decorators, we have made 
arrangements to have an 

ENAMEL TILE 

showing the whole series of Cherry Enamels fired. 
The price of the tile will be $2.00 postpaid. 



Send for Complete Price List of Cherry Colors and Enamels 

AND BUY YOUR FALL SUPPLY BEFORE 

THE PRICE GOES UP. 



The Robineau Pottery, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China PaintiDg SI. 00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.00 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

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A NEW BOOK 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover SI. 50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



SPECIAL ! 

"Favorite" China at Reduced Prices 

for Christmas Gifts. 

DO IT NOW ! 

Brush and Comb Trays 12^ x 9 inches at 89c 
11 x7}4 " at 79c 
10 x6K " at 69c 

Coupe Plates &A inches at $3.50 per dozen 





Cracked Ice Tub, No 7549— $1.50 Berry Dish, No. 4339— 75c 

Add parcel post charges to your zone. 

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Refer to back numbers of "Keramic Studio for other shapes and prices. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK, 
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Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 

JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



REMITTANCES!!! 



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is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



A FEW BOOKS ! 

With soiled covers are still on hand. 

5 ROSE BOOKS; 1 FRUIT BOOK; 

2 each CLASS ROOM Nos. 3 and 4; 

1 CLASS ROOM No. 2 

These we will sell for 
$1.75 post paid, until sold out. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



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On October 1st. 
For new rates see page I 

Contracts accepted for not more than one year at the present 
rates if made previous to above date. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



#^ 






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Each complete in one volume: Postpaid. 

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No. 1 3.00 

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Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing. Class 

r. Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain. 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 

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SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 

One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 6.50 

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Eight Books, including * 'Book of C ups and Saucers" 19.50 

The Nine Books Complete and 1 year's sub. 21.00 

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to Keramic Studio 5.00 

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Keramic Studio 6.00 

{KERAMIC STUDIO MAGAZINE, $4.00 PER YEAR 



• - 



;** 



A NEW BOOK 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 
from her articles published in Keramic Studio. 

Paper Coyer $1.50 post paid Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid 
Send card for information and prospectus. 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



T fr \ 






K-E-EL-T=> TH 



F"i R_J 



A_*L.I VEI^ 




The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF NOVEMBER, 1916 



Editorial 

Bonbon Box, Rose Tree Motif 

Bonbon Box, Orange Tree Motif 

Belleek Bowl 

Small Things to Make in Enamels 

Witch Hazel in Summer 

Witch Hazel in Autumn 

Witch Hazel Motifs to Use on Halloween Favors 

Border, Flower Clusters 

Vases 

Bureau Tray 

Border and Card Plate 

Pin Tray and Vase 

Chocolate Cup and Saucer 

Vase 

Satsuma Vase in Enamels 

New Books Worth Reading 

Lemonade Set 

Conventional Bowl, Bachelor Butter Design 

Answers to Correspondents 

Beginners' Corner 



A. W. Heckman 
A. W. Heckman 
Elise W. Tally 
F. R. Weisskopf 
M. A. Yeich 
M. A. Yeich 
M. A. Yeich 
Lola A. St. John 
Stella Gray Whitman 
Stella Gray Whitman 
Stella Gray Whitman 
Stella Gray Whitman 
M. C. McCormick 
H. L. Bridwell 
Ethel Naubert Hamilton 
Anita Gray Chandler 
Hattie Schumann 
Albert W. Heckman 



NATURALISTIC SECTION 



Game Plate, Snipe 

Stein, Pine Cone 

Cup and Saucer, Roses 

Cooky Tray in White and Yellow 

Phlox 

Sugar and Creamer 

Yellow Rose Plate 

Vase in Pink Rambler 

Plant Analysis 

Scarlet Sage (Color Supplement) 

Water Lilies (Color Supplement) 



Adeline More 

W. K. Titze 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 

Eleanor R. Copeland 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

Lillian L. Priebe 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

Florence Wyman Whitman 

M. H. Watkeys 

Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 



Page 

89 

90 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

96 

97 

98 

99 

99 

100 

100 

100 

101 

102 

102 

103 



49 
50, 51 
5J 
52 
53 
54 
54 
55 
56 
56 
56 



THE OLD RELIABLE HzEHil FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No.f2 Size 14 x 12 in $30.00 ) 

No. 3 Size 16x19 in 40.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



[■ Gas Kiln 2 sizes 



Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes 



( No. 1 Size 10 x 12 in $15.00 

| No. 2 Size 16 x 12 in 20.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in... 25.00 

I No. 4 Size 18 x 26 in. 50.00 



<e. 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Springfield, Ohio 



_y 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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Vol. XVIII, No. 7. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



November 1916 




FTER long and careful consideration 
the Editors and Publishers have de- 
cided to restore Keramic Studio to 
its original form until after the war. 
The increased cost of production 
together with the scarcity of good 
ware for decoration has made im- 
possible the contemplated issue of 
a separate publication for the nat- 
uralistic. However to more than 
counterbalance this we have to an- 
nounce some splendid improvements. Beginning with the 
December issue, if possible, at any rate, not later than Jan- 
uary, we will introduce several new departments; a page de- 
voted to Beginners edited by Miss Jessie Bard; a page devoted 
to some one of the leading decorators with portrait, photo of 
studio and work; a page devoted to table linen and furnish- 
ings, edited by Miss Jetta Ehlers; a page of art notes, edited 
by Miss Anita Gray Chandler, all illustrated; monthly pages 
of design with art notes and instruction by Mrs. Kathryn 
Cherry, of St. Louis, Mrs. A. A. Frazee of Chicago, Miss Maud 
Mason of New York, Mrs. Dorothea Warren O'Hara of New- 
York and Mrs. Henrietta Barclay Paist of Minneapolis. (We 
give the names alphabetically so that we shall not be ac- 
cused of favoritism by the loyal adherents of any of these 
prominent decorators). 

We may have one or two new pages to add to this 
list, but as it stands we feel that we have accomplished 
wonderful results to get the co-operation of these leading 
decorators and artists and we feel that our subscribers will 
generously respond by helping us to keep up the good work. 
This they can do materially by giving as Christmas presents 
as many subscriptions of Keramic Studio as they conveniently 
can and getting their friends to do the same. If each sub- 
scriber would send only one extra subscription we would be 
greatly repaid for our trouble. Won't you try to do this? 
Later when we begin to emerge from the war cloud there will 
be still greater improvements. We have decided not to publish 
the naturalistic part of the magazine separately for the present 
on account of the added expense, and we have been unable to 
eliminate it entirely from Keramic Studio to please our more 
advanced workers, because of the number of decorators who 
still feel it imperative to do something of this kind to cater to 
their public, but we will at least use every effort to improve 
the quality of the naturalistic material published, though 
it is very difficult to get it now, the more advanced workers 
having given it up entirely, feeling that if the public cannot 
yet it they will more quickly assimilate the newer work. 

If our readers could know how proud we are not only to 
have secured the co-operation of these leading decorators, but 
especially to find them all so liberally willing to work, together 
for the good cause of better ceramic decoration, leaving out 
entirely all petty jealousy and personal rivalry, they would 
rejoice with us that the calumny "that women cannotwork 
together in harmony for a good cause" has been so wonder- 
fully refuted. We are seeking now some prominent decorators 
who can and are willing to do the same for the workers in the 



semi-naturalistic that these are doing for the disciples of the 
conventional and if good luck attends us, they will also appear 
in this new issue. We cannot give the names until we hear 
definitely. 

We are especially anxious to put before our readers as 
many different types of original design as possible so that 
they will begin to appreciate the value of original work and 
learn not to be content simply to copy the work of others, but 
as they become proficient in the handling of materials, become 
also ambitious to make their own designs, evolve .their own 
personality. The chief advantage of sketching your designs 
by hand instead of relying on tracings is that each person 
has a characteristic touch. The lines of one will be firm and 
bold, another's will be fine and sensitive and so on; the same 
design executed by the two types will be quite unlike and will 
not have the stereotj^ped expression of commercial work ob- 
tained by the use of transfers and decalcomania. It will 
also be found that little by little each decorator can learn to 
design for herself, of course the degree of originality will depend 
upon her gift, but she can at least learn to recombine motifs 
and the satisfaction is immense to be able to say truthfully: 
this is my own design. Keramic Studio aims to put before its 
public the very best obtainable of ceramic design and figures, 
so that the process of instruction with each individual will be 
generally as follows: first, tracing and copying a design exactly; 
second, adapting it to other shapes; third, varying the color 
scheme; fourth, recombining the motifs; fifth, making original 
motifs. There is little satisfaction in selling a piece decorated 
with the exact design used by another. There is some satis- 
faction in having it rearranged in color or design so that it is 
different. But when you can say it is the only one of its kind, 
then life will seem worth while. 



The Keramic Society of Greater New York offers the 
following courses at the American Museum of Natural History, 
77th Street and Central Park West, New York City. 

On October 4th, 11th and 18th the lessons will be especially 
devoted to the planning and working out of a fine collection of 
keramics, linens, etc., to be shown at the important exhibi- 
tion of the National Society of Craftsmen to be held in Decem- 
ber. 

Beginning with the first Wednesday in January, 1917, 
Mr. Fry will give a course of 16 lessons. 

The work will be arranged in two parallel courses: one in 
which Design will be considered with especial reference to 
overglaze keramics, the other one dealing with keramics and 
kindred forms of handwork in their relation to each other and 
to the broad field of Table Decoration. 

At each lesson both of these subjects will be considered, 
so that those interested only in keramics, and others desiring 
to specialize in the study of Table Decoration, may all be kept 
continuously occupied. This course is to be followed by an 
exhibition. 

K K 

Two important exhibitions of crafts in November: Art 

Institute. Chicago, and Detroit Society of Arts and Crafts. 



90 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




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91 




BELLEEK BOWL— ELISE W. TALLY 



OUTLINE in Black. Band enclosing medallions in Gold, 
also Gold at top and bottom. Lightest flower and buds 
in J Old Egyptian Turquoise, h White; dots above flower in 
Dull Yellow, Dark Yellow and Rhodian^Red. Leaves in § 



stem in \ New Green, \ Light Yellow, § White. Small tri- 
angle shape circled by gold band; flower forms in same blue, 
green and yellow. Inside border: Flowers § Old Egyptian 
Turquoise, | White. Forms nearest bands in dark blue, cen- 



Old Chinese Blue, h Old Egyptian Turquoise; veins and centra ters dull yellow and green touches. 



92 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SMALL THINGS TO MAKE IN ENAMELS— F. R. WEISSKOPF 



(Treatment page 93) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



93 




WITCH HAZEL IN. SUMMER— M. A. YEICH 



SMALL THINGS TO MAKE, IN ENAMELS (Page 92) 

F. R. Weisskopf 
SALT SHAKER 

OUTLINE in Black. Fill in small leaves and outer section 
of large flower in Black enamel. Center of large flower, 
Orange Red; next space, Celtic; next space, Swiss Blue. Large 
leaves Grey Green, small flower centers Orange and petals 

Swiss Blue. 

MEDALLION 

Outer lines Black. Tendrils Black. Leaves Aquama- 
rine. Flower form Orange Red, Citron and Lilac. 

BOX 

Outlines, leaves and dark leaves on large flower, Gold. 
Lighter leaves and little cup at bottom of flower Florentine 



Green. Petals, alternate Italian Pink and Mulberry. Round 
flower, Lotus center, Lilac. Outer petals, small flower Lotus, 
center Amethyst petals. 

SALT SHAKER 
Stems and leaves Celtic Green. Dots and stems Black. 
Top oval of flower Jasmine, next section Egyptian Blue, next 
section, Lotus, last section Egyptian Blue. 

CORDIAL GLASS 

Outlines and small squares and circular forms, Gold. 
Leaves Florentine Green. Grapes Mulberry and Amethyst. 

TEA CADDY 
Heavy bands and lines in Gold. Leaves Black. Large 
flower center, Black; next row of petals, Lotus. Pointed petals 



94 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



Orange, outer circle Jersey Cream with Black lines. Bell 
shaped flower large part, Chinese Blue. Pointed petals Black 
and Celtic Green; next row Chinese Blue. Small flowers, 
Lotus. Center petals Ivory and Orange. 

MEDALLION 
Lines and stems Peacock Green. Leaves Warm Grey. 
Flower center Jasmine. Leaves alternating Italian Pink and 
Mulberry. 

MEDALLION 
Large form at bottom Orange Red. Pear shaped form 
Citron. Grapes Cadet Blue. Black forms Amethyst. Leaves 
Grey Green. 



WITCH HAZEL MOTIFS (Page 95) 

M. A. Yeich 
T>AINT the flowers with Lemon Yellow and Albert Yellow. 
•t Unripe burrs are Grey Green and Brown Green, while those 
that are farther advanced are of several tones of Brown. The 
leaves vary from Grey Green, Moss Green, Night Green and 
Brown Green to Yellow Ochre, Meissen Brown, and Dark 
Brown. The branches may be painted with Copenhagen 
Grey and Dark Brown. For the motifs, a black and gold 
scheme on an ivory ground may be used, thus employing the 
Halloween colors. Paint the flowers, burrs, leaves and stems 
with Gold, using Black for lines. Use Black for the solid 
black parts in the designs and tint ground with ivory. 




WITCH HAZEL IN AUTUMN— M. A. YEICH 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



95 




WITCH HAZEL MOTIFS TO USE ON HALLOWEEN FAVORS— M. A. YEICH (Treatment page 94) 



96 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BORDER, FLOWER CLUSTERS— LOLA A. St. JOHN 
Bands on this are Green Gold and Antique Gold. 





BROWN VASE— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 



o 



VASE— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 
UTLINE in Black. Background Olive Green and Yellow 



OUTLINE in Black. Background Auburn Brown. Flower V^ Brown. Flowers Yellow Brown and Orange. Wash 
Yellow Brown. Leaves and stems Auburn Brown mixed thin. Leaves and stem arrangements Brown Green mixed 
with Olive Green. with a little Auburn Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



97 




BUREAU TRAY— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 



(Treatment page 99) 



98 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




BORDER— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 
Outline Black. Background Satsuma. Flowers Yellow Ochre, Orange and Vermillion. Stems and leaf arrangement Olive Green. 




CARD PLATE— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 

Outline in Grey mixed with Black. Background Satsuma. Leaves and stems Dark Grey mixed with Olive Green and little 

Red. Flowers Rose, Violet and Lemon Yellow. Centers same as flowers only color 

stronger, gold band around plate. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



99 




PIN TRAY— STELLA GRAY WHITMAN 

OUTLINE in Black. Tint pin tray (also bureau tray 
shown on page 99) in grey warmed with violet. Wipe 
out design, paint orchids with thin wash of Capucine Red, 
center of flowers Capucine Red on strong. Leaves and stems, 
background mixed with Olive Green. Band around tray of 
Gold. 





BLUE VASE 

Stella Gray Whitman 

OUTLINE with Copenhagen Blue and 
Black. Background equal parts Co- 
penhagen Blue and Grey. Leaves and stem 
arrangements Copenhagen Blue mixed with 
dark Blue Violet and Albert Yellow. Orch- 
ids Rose, Violet, White and Albert Yellow. 



CHOCOLATE CUP AND SAUCER— M. C. McCORMICK 



THE outline, fine lines and dots are Black. Lines back of 
design and black bands are Gold. The space next to 
gold bands is a thin wash of Apple Green and a little Albert 
Yellow. Light tone in leaves is Apple Green and a little Shad- 
ing Green and shaded with Shading Green and a little Copen- 



hagen Blue. The small dark leaves are Yellow Green and a 
little Brown Green. Flowers are Rose shaded to almost white 
toward the center. Stamens are Yellow Brown and centers of 
flowers are the lightest leaf tone. Forget-me-nots are Band- 
ing Blue and Copenhagen Blue. 



100 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Lustre rather heavy over the entire surface including gold and 
background and give it a rose fire. 




CARRY out 
nish the g 
cations of gold 



VASE— H. L. BRIDWELL 

all of the black in Roman Gold and fire. Bur- 
old, it should be a smooth surface, two appli- 
may be necessary. Then flow Light Green 



SATSUMA VASE IN ENAMELS 

Ethel Naubert Hamilton 

FIRST Fire — Outline design in Black. The bands, rim and 
lining of the neck of the vase are Green Gold. Second 
Fire — Entire design is colored in Soft Enamels. All leaves are 
Olive Green shaded with Brown Green. Flower at left is Ivory 
shaded with Brown Green; middle flower is Orange shaded with 
Yellow Brown; flower at the right is Yellow Brown shaded with 
Hair Brown. Borders around the flowers and centers are same 
as the flowers are shaded with. Small flowers are light shades of 
Rose, Lavender, and Baby Blue. Oval figures are light Yellow 
Brown. Put on second coat of Green Gold. A third fire may 
be necessary to strengthen the colors. 



NEW BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler 
"The Russian Arts" by Rosa Newmarch. (E. P. Dutton 
and Co., New York.) Price $2.00. 

Those to whom Russian art is untried ground have a 
pleasant surprise in store for them in Miss Newmarch's latest 
book. To the average person's mind Russian Art means 
Bakst and the startling whirl of color suggested by the Imperial 
ballet. But Miss Newmarch goes back to beginnings and 
pursues a course through its various developments to the pres- 
ent stage. There are some thirty-odd illustrations of unusual 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



101 



merit. The reader is struck with the forceful, clear-cut char- 
acter of most of the paintings. The choice of subjects is 
indicative of the Russian mind. The cover is worthy of note 
itself — silhouetted black mosques and minarets against an 
orange sky. A thoroughly pleasing book. 

"Essays on Art," by Max Weber. (Laurence J. Gomme.) 
Price $1.25. 

A serious little book dealing with such subjects as Pre- 
paring to See, Art Consciousness, Purity in Art, and other 
fundamentals. A thought stimulant. 

& fT 

LEMONADE SET 

Hattie Schumann 

THE outline and black tones in design are Black. Second 
fire. — Oil the vertical figure between the two lower blos- 
soms and dust with 4 Pearl Grey and 1 Blood Red. Oil leaves 
and dust with 2 parts Florentine Green and 1 Water Lily 
Green. Oil the remainder of design and the grey bands and 
dust with Deep Ivory. The space around the red figure is 
dusted with Glaze for Blue and the entire remaining surface 
of china is dusted with 5 parts Ivory Glaze, 1 Deep Ivory and 
a little Albert Yellow. 





LEMONADE SET— HATTIE SCHUMANN 



102 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

S. M. H. — Will you kindly tell me what is used to prevent fired in silver 
from tarnishing? I have an anti-tarnish liquid but it doesn't dry when applied. 
Is there a silver that does not tarnish? 

2. I have difficulty in using Fry's Special Tinting Oil for grounding and 
dusting, while some workers like it belter than the grounding oil; when I apply 
the dry powder to the padded surface, it doesn't lake it evenly. Is it applied just 
the same as the grounding oil? 

1. We do not know of anything to prevent the tarnish. Yes, all good 
silver tarnishes but is easily cleaned with a silver polish. Perhaps your anti- 
tarnish requires to be fired. 

2. Yes, the Special Oil is applied the same, you should have no trouble 
in using it as it is used very successfully, perhaps you do not apply it evenly. 
Try letting it stand ten or fifteen minutes before applying the color, when the 
oil is very fresh this helps it to take the color better. 

Mrs. C. II. T. — I have a salad bowl painted like enclosed cut. The colors 
are too vivid. I loish to know if there are colors I can dust on to soften the whole 
design except gold parts. Would Ivory Glaze change the color of the rose and blue 
to make it look ugly? 

2. I have tried to get While Glaze but instead they sent me While Enamel. 
Is it used the same way, to dust on oil? 

3. Can you tell me where I can buy While Glaze? 

4. / have a copper bowl that is covered with Utile bits of spots. Has had 
two coals of Copper Lustre. Will another coal of copper cover it or would you 
advise green lustre or some thing else? It has an enamel border which has been 
fired twice. Austrian china. Can I cover enamel border and all with Gieen 

Lustre! 

1. It will probably be better to paint a color over the parts as dusting 
might make it too heavy, you will have to try the different colors to see what 
colors will grey them. Violet over some shades of blue will soften it or possibly 
a grey or green. There is nothing to change a stronger pink into a delicate 
shade — you might try dusting Ivory Glaze over the colors and giving it a 
hard fire, sometimes that will weaken a color. 

2. White enamel is mixed with an enamel medium. It cannot be dusted 
on. 

3. Ivory Glaze is a white glaze, we do not know of anything under that 
particular name. 

4. If the spots are not too large another application may cover the spots 
though it does not always do so. The3 r would be just as likely to show through 



the green lustre. The green lustre might spot the color of your enamels if 
they are light colors. 

./. A. D. — What would be considered a just price for redecorating with 
Hasburg's Gold, a dinner set. of one hundred pieces. The gold is much worn off 
thus requiring two applications of gold a7id two firings to most, of the pieces to make 
possible the best wearing qualities? 

The best way to arrive at such a conclusion is to estimate the amount 
of gold required and the cost of same, also the cost of the firing, then estimate as 
nearly as possible the amount of time it will take to do the work, va'ue your 
time at a price by the hour or day that you think you should make and add 
all together. 

N. H. — I have a large vase decorated with conventional peacocks. The 
background is on matt blue, dry dusted on. I find that when handling the same 
if my fingers are the least moist it invariably leaves a mark on this dull background. 
Can you suggest anything that I can apply and still have the dull appearance 
remain? 

There is nothing that you can use that wi'l not give a glazed appearance. 
You could paint a color over it but it would glaze it through; probably it would 
not be as highly glazed as the regular glazed colors. 

J. H. T. — In the Beginners Corner on page 62 you say to clean gold brushes 
in alcohol and the gold can be refired. Does it mean Wood or Grain Alcohol? 

Wood alcohol is used. 

E. L. S. — Please let me know whether Comb and Brush Tray, Wild Rose 
by M. C. McCormick in February number, 1916, should be outlined and in what 
color? 

W.ould it look well to make the entire background in grey or the center grey 
and the outer band in cream and pink? 

This design adapts itself better to an outline. Use Dark Grey and a little 
black. 

It would be better to have the outer band a different color than the cen- 
ter. The colors you suggest are alright. 

M. H. S.—How is the matt effect produced, No. 833 by Mr. E. Challinor 
at Burley Exhibit, reproduced in January, 1916 No. of Keramic Studio? 

2. I have a pile of glass slabs with a little gold on each. Is there any way 
of getting it off for use? 

1. Matt colors were probably used. 

2. If you mean to use it as it is, the gold can be taken off by putting a 
few drops of lavender oil on the slab and work it into the gold with a palette 
knife until soft. Or, if you wanted to retire it, wash the gold into a receptacle 
with a brush and wood alcohol. 




CONVENTIONAL BOWL, BACHELOR BUTTON MOTIF— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



ALL pointed petals and broad bands in Dark Blue. Other 
petals and bands in Water Green No. 2. Panels in 
Grey Blue and background Glaze for Blue. 



Treatment No. 2. Paint in all bands in Green Gold. Dust 
flowers with Cameo and panels with Dove Grey. Background 
in Glaze for Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



103 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD, Editor, Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 




SEDJI FLOWER POT AND SAUCER 

Marguerite Cameron 

FIRST fire — Paint heavy outlines Black. Second fire — 
Paint top of pot and edge of saucer with Olive and Dark 
Green half and half, flowers Bright Silver. 

This design may be used for a cup and saucer or any 
round surface. One of the first lessons in china decoration 
should be neatness, for you cannot get beautiful, happy results 
when working in an untidy careless manner, so clean the china 
well, then divide it in as many sections as the design requires. 
A plate divider can be used and is a great time saver but if you 
have none, a straight strip of paper may be used instead, the 
narrow paper that comes on a bolt of ribbon is good to use 
for this. Use India ink for marking and not a china marking 
pencil as the pencil makes a broad mark usually and the width 
of a line might throw you out in your divisions. A No. 
short haired outlining brush is good for all ink outlining. Mark 
a space on your paper the width between the two dotted lines 
on the study and then place a fine ink mark at the top of the 
cup and from this measure off the spaces all around the cup 
the width of the markings on your paper. If it does not come 
out even either make each section a little larger or smaller 
whichever is easiest to adjust in the design. One of Hasburg's 
new Keramic Gauges is very useful in getting the design on 
even. Set it to the width from the top of the cup to the nearest 
band and draw a line all around the cup and then go over it 
in a fine ink line. Learn to make very neat narrow grey lines. 
Take a piece of transparent tracing paper, lay it over the design 
and make a careful tracing of a complete section of the design; 
this can be done with a fine pen and ink, put the dotted lines 
on also. Plastiline is a modeling wax and is used to hold the 
design in place on the china while transferring it; this can be 
bought from any art dealer. Place two little pieces of it on the 
china so that it will come on each edge of the paper and lay 



your tracing on the china so that the dotted lines will be over 
the division marks on the china and also be sure that the upper 
band is over the horizontal line on the cup, this will prevent 
the design from being placed higher in one section than in 
another. Tear off a small piece of grey graphite paper (do not 
use a heavy black carbon as it will interfere with your work) 
slip it under the design carbon side down and then with a sharp 
7 H pencil go over the lines on the design. After you have 
two or three sections traced in, go over the design on the china 
with the India ink. Keep the design before you and watch 
all spaces making the necessary corrections as you ink; the 
hand is usually a little unsteady with a pencil and the carbon 
tracing will not always be correct so that it will be necessary 
to make corrections. Do not depend on making these cor- 
rections with the gold or color but make them all in this ink 
drawing.' After the design is carefully inked all around the 
cup, clear off all wax marks and any other soil that may be on 
the china. Take a box of Green Gold and with a clean palette 
knife remove a little of it on to a clean glass and rub it up with 
enough Garden Lavender Oil to make it the consistency of 
thick cream. It is best to just put out enough gold to use at 
the time to keep it clean and it also is easier to rub a small 
quantity through thoroughly than a large amount and insures 
better work. A good device for dropping the right amount of 
lavender on the gold is to take either a large brush handle or a 
deer-foot orange stick, cut it the length of the bottle, sharpen 
the end to a point and stick it in the cork of the bottle and in 
this manner the lavender can be dropped out instead of pouring. 
Apply the gold with a No. 2 Winsor & Newton Red Sable 
pointed water color brush. This brush should not be used for 
anything except gold and should be kept perfectly clean. Apply 
the gold rather thin as Green Gold does not burnish well if 
applied too heavy. All of the black in the design is to be in 
Gold. When the gold is all on, clean all division lines from the 
china and it is ready to fire. Put a drop of lavender on the 
glass and rub the brush in this and work out all the gold you 
can and then clean the brush in wood alcohol that has been 
placed for this purpose in a corked bottle. This gold can be 
saved. 

Second Fire — Burnish the gold with a glass brush rubbing 
it back and forth with a regular motion until the gold looks 
bright. Tint the grey edge of the cup and saucer with a thin 
wash of half Apple Green and half Yellow Green and paint the 
grey tones in the flowers with Albert Yellow and a little Yellow 
Brown, being careful to keep the paint off the gold. A No. 
4 pointed camel's hair brush should be used for the flowers, 
and a No. 5 or 6 square shader for the tint. Go over all gold 
again the same as in first fire. 

Caution— Be sure to have all ink work in very grey and 
very narrow lines. Practice on a piece of china until you suc- 
ceed. The secret is to get just the right amount of ink in the 
brush; keep the brush in a good point and bear down very 
lightly while working as the harder you bear down the wider 
the lines will become. Be sure that there are no finger or 
paint marks left oh the china or under it before it goes to the 
fire and above all things "Be Neat." 

» K 

A SUGGESTION 

Mrs. H. A. Lillibridge 

IN teaching and firing for others I notice that the greatest 
fault is in their tinted backgrounds, and upon inquiry find 
it is mostly due to negligence as to "pats." Too much care 
cannot be paid to this seemingly insignificant detail. The 
patjshould be made of fluffy cotton (I use the best medicated 
cotton) not "wadded" but placed in a nice layer with the edges 



104 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



turned under, covered with a firm but not stiff piece of jap 
silk, bound with a tiny rubber band and pulled out until it is 
"fluffy." In patting, use a "deft" motion instead of "pound- 
ing" the china. Then in washing the silk for pats take a good 
warm soap suds to which a tiny bit of kerosene has been added, 
immerse the silk and let it come to a good boil, rinse in another 
good suds, then in clear water and roll in a large towel, wringing 
in the towel. Then, while wet, iron with a very hot iron on 
both sides, leaving them without a wrinkle or crease. I have 
a tiny line in the studio to hang my pat silks on where they 
are handy and always without a crease. Pats cared for in 
this way insure a perfect tinted background on your set of 
dishes. 

Another good suggestion is after washing the silk to paste 
it on the window or a mirror to dry, this does not make it as 
stiff as when pressed with a hot iron. 




SALT SHAKER— LEAH H. RODMAN 




SATSUMA BOX— DANTE C. BABBITT 



TRACE on design and outline with a mixture composed 
of 1-3 each Ivory Black, Deep Blue and Brunswick 
Black and fire. For the enamels use Warren's Reamhite 
Enamel No. 2, mixed with Warren's enamel medium and per- 
fectly clean turpentine. Use only enough medium to barely 
hold the powder together, too much will keep the mass soft 
too long and not allow any chance to model the flower and 
buds. By care this can be done in one fire. After having 
enamel so it will stay put, take a clean palette knife, small 
size, and place the enamel on portions of flower which would 
be nearest one were it a real blossom. A square shader mois- 
tened with turpentine can then be used to gently float some of 
the enamel to the edge of the flower. Keep the center flat, 
a mere wash in fact. A stemmer is good to use in applying 



the enamel to the bud, applying heavily in a swirl like stroke 
to obtain the tinted effect in a morning glory bud. For the 
leaves and stems use Warren's Green Enamel No. 2 (for soft 
glaze) applied flatly. The dotted background is gold and a 
band of the same dotted effect is sufficient decoration for lower 
portion of box. Keep this band half on the lid, half on lower 
part of box. This reamwhite enamel is a very deep cream 
before firing but comes out with only a faint tinge of warm 
effect. Allow a full week for the enamel to dry before firing. 
After firing shade the flower and bud using pale green for the 
heart of flower also base, a suggestion of soft grey on some of 
the flower and a rosy pink for the markings, also the bud. Do 
not overdo the matter of shading and keep the leaves perfectly 
flat. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SCARLET SAGE— m. H. watkeys. 
See Naturalistic Section, page 56, for treatment 



NOVEM BER 1916 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



COPYRIGHT 1916 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



K. E. CHERRY 

China 
Colors and Enamels 



The demand for Cherry Colors and especially for 
Enamels is growing steadily. 



On request of several china decorators, we have made 
arrangements to have an 

ENAMEL TILE 

showing the whole series of Cherry Enamels fired. 
The price of the tile will be $2.00 postpaid. 



Send for Complete New Price List of Cherry Colors 
and Enamels. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 



The Robineau Pottery, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



SPECIAL UNTIL DECEMBER 1st. ! 

"FAVORITE" CHINA AT A DISCOUNT OF 10% FOR CHRISTMAS 
GIFTS. DO IT NOW I 

Serving Trays 17}i x 6M inches . . . $1.85 

" 17^x9^ " .... 2.50 

Manicure Trays 10 x 6M " • • • • -79 

Four Sided Candlesticks 8J4 inches high . $ .70 each 




No. 3381. Loaf Sugar Tray 50o 
Add parcel post charges to your zone. 

No China Catalogue Issued. 

Refer to back numbers of "Keramic Studio for other shapes and prices 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK, 

25c and 50c Postpaid. 

WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD 

Add two cents postage for each box. 
COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS* SUPPLIES- 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 
JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



REMITTANCES!!! 



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is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
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How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

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Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.00 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

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Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

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from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

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f\ HOMTIILY MAGAZINE TOR THE POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF DECEMBER, 1916 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 

Enameled Belleek Vase 

To Keramic Studio Students 

Belleek Bowl 

Glass Decorating 

Chocolate Pot and Cup 

What Can be Done with the Supplement Designs 

Porridge Set 

Tea Set 

Embroideries of Mr. and Mrs. Armfield 

Various Steps in Motif Development 

Beginners' Corner 

Breakfast Set 

Answers to Correspondents 

Vase 

The Linen Page 

Child's Set 

Tea Set Design 

Salts and Peppers, Sugar and Creamer 

Berry Set 

Rose Candlestick, Powder Box, Salt and Pepper, Butter Tub 

Conventional Sheet (Supplement) 

Bowl, Rose Panels 

Plate Borders 

The Book Shelf 

Medallion and Borders 



Anita Gray Chandler 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Elise W. Tally 
Laura Holtz O'Neill 
Albert W. Heckman 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara 
Maud M. Mason 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 
Jessie M. Bard 
M. A. Young john 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
Jetta Ehlers 
Mary L. Brigham 
Walter K. Titze 
Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
Jeanne M. Stewart 
May E. Reynolds 
Florence Milton McCarthy 
Adeline More 
Ida Nowels Cochran 
Anita Gray Chandler 
Esther A. Coster 



Page 
105 
106 
107 
108-109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
119 
119 
120 
(21 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
126 
127 
128 
128 



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WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 

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Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes 



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Size 16 x J2 in 


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Size 16 x 15 in 


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No. 4 


Size 18x26 in 


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Springfield, Ohio 



t ? 

'* NOV 




Vol. XVIII, No. 8. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



December 1916 




ERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL ! 
And how do you like our Christmas 
number? We have never had a 
prouder moment in our editorial life 
than when we saw the material that 
was to go into this issue. It seems 
like the promise of a new lease of life, 
the kindly enthusiasm with which so 
many of our prominent decorators 
have taken hold with the editor of 
Keramic Studio to help keep the fire alive. And more yet is 
promised than what is already arranged for regularly, but we 
will not speak of that until it materializes. In the meantime 
we are going to make a great effort to keep up to the standard 
we have set in this issue and never look back, but always for- 
ward to still better things. We want to hear from you, how 
you like the new departments and which you find most helpful. 
First there is the page of general art notes by Anita Gray 
Chandler. This is by way of keeping in touch with other arts 
and crafts so that ceramic workers will grow to realize that they 
are a part of the whole art movement, and to take a living inter- 
est in keeping abreast of the times. Miss Chandler will be glad 
to have you write her on any point. Then there are the spe- 
cially edited pages. Tell us which you find the most helpful, 
so we can tell the editors your needs. They are the best sources 
of instruction to be found in the United States. Some of our 
page editors had not time to get everything prepared as they 
would wish. Few ceramic workers have had either the experi- 
ence or the time to attempt editorial work, and it will be 
necessary for them to accustom themselves to the harness, but 
we are sure you will see a steady improvement in this respect. 
There are two or three more page editors to join the ranks who 
had not time to prepare anything for this issue. 

The following letter from Miss Jeanne Stewart, who is to 
be one of the editors of the semi-naturalistic pages, will explain 
itself as well as the reason for other new features not appearing 
in this issue: 

"I "am unable to get up anything new into new Studio, just now on 
account of moving, so it would be best to leave my work out of December 
issue entirely, as I have nothing in the way of articles, notes, etc., to send on 
such short notice. Next month I can send something worth while. It is 
impossible to send material as I should like for this issue — but it will arrive 
for future numbers." Yours very truly, 

Jeanne M. Stewart. 

Then our Beginners' Corner which Miss Bard is so thought- 
fully editing, isn't it full of information? Can you make any 
helpful suggestions? 

And how do you like our new table linen department? So 
much thought is being given now to the harmonizing of table 
furnishings that we know this will appeal to you all. Is there 
something special you wish to know along this line? If so, 
write to the editor, Miss Ehlers. 

Do you not think we deserve your support and help in 
increasing the circulation of Keramic Studio so that we can do 
more and still better things for you? If each one of you would 
give a subscription to some artist friend for Christmas, we could 
immediately resume the second color supplement, which we have 
discontinued because the unfavorable war conditions precluded 
our using as good a color process for the second supplement as 



we have always used for our regular supplement, thus making 
it unsatisfactory from an artistic standpoint. Or if each of you 
would get a new subscriber for us from among your acquaint- 
ances, we could afford this best color press for two supplements, 
instead of one. We would like to use much more color work in 
Keramic Studio, but it is veiy expensive and only your enthu- 
siastic support would make it possible. 

We would like to hear from you, too, whether you would 
like us to resume the department of pottery which we discon- 
tinued some time ago because we did not find enough interest 
to support it. More work is being done now in this line and 
possibly you would like it again. And how about the other 
crafts? We once ran a crafts department in Keramic Studio, 
but felt you were not quite ready for it. Perhaps now you are 
more interested. We wish every one who is interested in other 
arts or crafts than ceramics would write and tell us whether 
they would like us to add a crafts department. If there are 
enough to make it worth while we will start this department 
again. Of course, any added department would occupy extra 
pages. They would not take any of our regular space. Would 
you like a department of instruction in oils and water colors? 
Tell us what you would like. And if you all come enthusiasti- 
cally to our financial support by sending new subscriptions you 
wall find us quick to respond with added values in Keramic 
Studio. We want to avoid raising the subscription price of 
Keramic Studio if possible, and only your hearty support in 
getting new subscriptions will avert that necessity, since many 
even of the general magazines which appeal to a much larger 
circulation have found this necessary with the increase in cost 
of production. The field of Keramic Studio, being confined 
solely to workers in ceramics, is veiy limited, and we must have 
many more subscribers than we have to make it profitable to 
carry on the magazine at the present price. 

We had hoped to issue a separate magazine for the use 
and education of the workers in the naturalistic, but in study- 
ing the situation we found not enough response from this sec- 
tion of the work to justify the added expense at this time. At 
the same time, understanding the necessity that many of our 
decorators are under, to cater to that part of the public which 
has not yet learned to appreciate the purely conventional, we 
have secured the help of several decorators who are willing to 
give you semi-naturalistic material for this purpose, although 
quite capable themselves of designing the purely conventional. 
We appreciate very much their support in this matter, because 
we realize from long experience that one can not expect the 
average student to make the abrupt change from purely., nat- 
uralistic to the purely conventional. 

H » 

We hope to make a permanent feature of The Glass Deco- 
ration Department which we begin this month with Mrs. 
O'Neill's article. Will be glad to purchase designs for glass 
work with treatments in glass colors. 
x » 

The editor wishes to make her regular yearly offer of Ke- 
ramic Studio publications or Robineau Porcelains in exchange 
for old collections of stamps for her son. If you have any such, 
please send for examination without waiting to write. They 
will be returned with cost of sending if unavailable. 



106 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER - - - Page Editor 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker at Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



TF you do not believe there is plenty of opportunity for the 
-■■ woman who is "handy with her brush" read this list of 
things which are much in demand to-day provided they are 
well done. Not to mention a single one of the numerous 
hand-painted china articles that constantly are being made. 
We shall go down in history as a Painted Age. 
Bed-room furniture Flower pots Hats 

Mirror frames Bird-cages Evening gowns 

Candle-sticks Trinket-boxes Slippers 

Candle and lamp- Telephone covers Parasols 

shades Book racks Fans 

Tea-trays Door holders 

The sixth annual exhibition of the Corcoran Art Gallery 
will be held December 17, January 21. The prizes are especi- 
ally tempting, to wit: First, $2,000, with Corcoran gold medal; 
second, $1,500 with Corcoran silver medal; third, $1,000 with 
Corcoran bronze medal; fourth, $500 with honorable mention. 
Is it any wonder that artists form the habit of exhibiting at 
the Corcoran Gallery? In the last five years more than 200,000 
visitors have attended the shows. If you are in Washington 
between these dates stop and see the exhibit. 

The American Artist's Committee of One Hundred, organ- 
ized three weeks after the Great War began, for the purpose 
of raising funds to aid families of French soldier artists, has 
recently issued an appeal for additional contributions. A sum 
nearly approaching $22,000 has already been collected. The 
committee's treasurer, W. B. Faxon, can be reached at 58 West 
Fifty-seventh Street, New York City. 

The University of Pennsylvania a while ago received a 
consignment of priceless Chinese antiquities excavated by 
Dr. Carl Bishop during an archaeological prospecting tour for 
the University, in China and Japan. Great quantities of the 
treasures were found in eaves once inhabited by the savage 
ancestors of the Chinese. Pottery bowls, basins, vases, jars, 
coffins, and even pottery and stone effigies which were buried 
with the master of the house, are some of the objects unearthed. 
The value of this find in relation to the history of ceramics 
is hard to estimate. 

A fitting memorial to those who saved "women and chil- 
dren first" when the Titanic went down April 15, 1913, is soon 
to be erected in Washington. The statue itself, representing 
an heroic masculine figure with arms out-stretched in the form 
of the Crucifixion, was designed by Mrs. Harry Payne Whitney 
and executed by a sculptor of Quincy, Mass., Mr. John Horri- 
gan. It is carved from one block of reddish granite. Mrs. 



Whitney first visited eight firms in Paris in an effort to have it 
cut in one piece but found none willing to attempt it. 

A glance through the advertisements of any English art 
magazine will "bring the war home to you" in a new way. 
For instance here is one insert: "Studios to Let. — Large 
and small at reduced rents during the war. Apply (up to 4) 
to Caretaker, Stanley Studios, Park Walk, Chelsea, S. W." 
One number of The Studio, published at 44 Leicester Square, 
London, contains a photograph sent from the War Camp 
at Giessen, showing a number of prisoners at work before their 
easels. A letter from one of them explains, "We are about 
twenty men, of many various artistic talents and qualities, 
from theatrical scenic painters to 'Beaux Arts' painters." 
He who paints must paint. 

An Autumn exhibition of Louis Raemaekers' cartoons 
at Copley Hall, Boston, created so much interest that it was 
prolonged week by week to admit the large numbers that wished 
to see it. The pictures were sold for the benefit of the Allied 
Relief Fund. Raemaekers is a native of Holland, who since 
the beginning of the war has used his facile pencil in behalf of 
the Allies. It is asserted that the Kaiser has set a price on his 
head should he enter German territory at any time. Mr. 
Raemaekers' rise to fame has been startling, to say the least. 
Francis Stopford, Editor of Land and Water, says of him, 
" Louis Raemaekers will stand out for all time as one of the 
supreme figures which the Great War has called into being." 
Those who have seen his work, whether in magazines, news- 
papers, or in exhibition will understand his claim to greatness. 
His drawings are utterly sincere, virile, penetrating, keen, 
with a lasting quality in every line. 

Not long ago certain electrical companies of the United 
States offered $2,200 in prizes for the best poster designs por- 
traying Electricity. The contest was open to both men and 
women designers but it was supposed that the former would 
far offset the latter in numbers. However, of the 781 posters 
submitted, 352 were by women — nearly half the entire number. 
The figures of the awards are as follows: One-fourth the prizes 
won by women; one-half the designs deserving special diplomas 
executed by women; 64 of the 125 posters finally chosen for 
display in art clubs, public libraries, etc., the work of women. 
Surely here is encouragement for the feminine designer. 

John Singer Sargent who is at present in Boston to super- 
intend the installation of his great mural, The Sermon on the 
Mount, at the Public Library, is reported to have purchased 
a charming old home in Oxfordshire, England, for his use when 
he shall return to that country. This house, built in the early 
part of the seventeenth century for Sir Lawrence Tanfield, 
has been a favorite with sketch-artists for a long while. 

In 1920 the tercentenary of the landing of the Pilgrims at 
Plymouth will be celebrated in New England, and observed 
with interest throughout the United States as an event of 
singular historic import. Plans are even now being proposed 
for a fitting form of celebration, and naturally differences of 
opinion are many. New Englanders in general seem to oppose 
a commercial demonstration such as a World's Fair or Exposi- 
tion. Others object to a stupendous pageant as being out of 
keeping with the stern Puritanical dislike of "shows". Ralph 
Adams Cram, the eminent architect and author, speaking before 
the American Society of Colonial Families in Boston last Octo- 
ber, launched his idea of an appropriate celebration. It is 
nothing less than the erection of a permanent Dream City 
which would be "half Venice, half Bruges" — the embodiment 
of the perfect expression of art. "I would like," said Mr. 
Cram, "to make that celebration a revelation of the eternal 

(Continued on page 128) 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY - 

Marina Building, St. Louis. Mo. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



107 



ENAMELED BELLEEK VASE 

Birds and Flowers in All Over Pattern 

T^\IVIDE vase in four sections, make tracing of birds and 
*-** medallion and trace on each section; then, the all over 
pattern of roses, daisies and leaves; do not trace in the small 
units; outline design in grey India ink lines. 




The dark color on birds is Night Blue enamel, the bill is Pur- 
ple Grey, back is Warm Grey E, tail is Grey Violet, the breast 
Silver Grey. The frame around birds is Chinese Blue. Now 
the border — The rose is Satsuma, the darkest color in rose is 
Warmest Pink, the dark dots are Amethyst, the leaves are Pea- 
cock Green, the daisy forms are Lavender, the circle forms are 
Celtic. Dark bands on vase, Night Blue. The light bands are 
Grey Violet. All stems are Oak Brown. Centers in flowers 
are Jersey Cream. 




Full size section of center panel of Vase 



108 

MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 



TO KERAMIC STUDIO STUDENTS 

COLOR is at once the joy and the despair of the artist who 
works for reproduction. Working out harmonious color 
combinations is one of the most fascinating phases of Art. 
But to suggest color schemes in cold type and with black and 
white illustrations for more or less inexperienced students 
to carry out, with the bewildering array of materials from which 
to choose, with no definite color nomenclature and no way 
of knowing the limitations of the individual workers, is another 
and a very discouraging proposition. 

Anyone who has tried to fulfill this mission will recall 
letters from discouraged students whose efforts to follow the 
instructions have not been crowned with success. We are 
called upon to suggest how to counteract unfortunate results 
and we tear our hair and worry the grey matter for a possible 
solution. Most of the trouble comes from a lack of any funda- 
mental knowledge of color — either from the chemical standpoint 
or that of harmonious color relations. Mineral colors have 
chemical affinities. There also are those which are antipathetic : 
a general understanding of these laws is a necessity to the suc- 
cessful ceramic artist. For the student using oil or water 
color the study of color harmony is sufficient. But the ceramic 
artist must go deeper into the subject and study the action of 
colors on each other in the fire; the temperature at which 
colors will develop; the quantity of the glazes of different 
wares; the nature and office of flux, etc. The pioneers in 
this field of art had to get most of their knowledge first hand, 
by actual experiment. Necessity makes students of us, and 
there is nothing which teaches so surely as failure, if one is wise 
enough to search for the cause. 

The manufacturers have to-day reduced the necessity 
for experiment to a minimum and experienced teachers can 
save their students unhappy experiences through which they 
may have passed: but there are still many ambitious workers 
who are far from this practical assistance, and they must needs 
travel through the road of experience. The memory of early 
struggles should breed sympathy for the perplexed and isolated 
workers of to-day; those who are geographically removed 
from the practical help of the large studios. This need has 
been admirably met in the answers to correspondents column 
of this magazine. For those who have availed themselves of this 
opportunity questions have been answered and suggestions 
made in the most sympathetic and helpful spirit. Anyone 
who will take the pains to study this column regularly will find 
it a veritable gold mine of information and, if those who have 
back numbers of Keramic Studio will take the trouble to read 
over these columns, they are almost sure to find the solution of 
their individual problems. Comparatively few avail them- 
selves of this privilege. 

How often we hear remarks like this "I didn't care for 
Keramic Studio this month, did you?" "There wasn't any- 
thing in it worth copying," or " Oh, I'm not taking Keramic 
Studio this year, I don't care for so much conventional" and so 
on ad infinitum. 

Friends and co-workers ! did it ever occur to you that 
Keramic Studio is the only Art Magazine which caters to stu- 
dents, which supplements regular art instruction of the studios 
and Art Schools? Do you realize that it is the only Art Mag- 
azine worthy the name, which encourages or allows copying. 
Where in the whole realm of art can the keramic student get 
so much inspiration and information, with the additional 




President and Vice-President of the T. C. K. C. 
Henrietta Barclay Paist Florence Huntington 

advantage of further information through the correspondence 
column, and all for 40c. the copy? 

Is it possible that we are never to grow away from the 
"picture book stage of understanding?" How many of us read 
the editorials and educational articles? How many avail 
themselves of the privilege of asking questions? This privilege 
alone is worth the price of the magazine. Do we fully appreciate 
the advantage of knowing from month to month what the rest 
of the keramic world is doing; of keeping in touch with 
Exhibitions and seeing reproductions of the best work all over 
the country? Is it no advantage to know where to procure 
materials for our work from reliable dealers? Do we appre- 
ciate the advantage of an advertising medium which brings 
customer and dealer, teacher and pupil together? Can you 
imagine any degree of success without such an organ? Other 
art magazines do not cater to our craft; their advertising pages 
do not reach the rank and file of keramic workers and their 
pages are rarely open to the keramic artist except where some 
individual has achieved unusual honor or distinction. 

We are already practically cut off from the Old World; 
our supplies are curtailed ; we are thrown more and more on our 
own resources; we need to keep in touch with each other; 
how else can we do this except through just such a medium as 
Keramic Studio? Then think of the wisdom and patience re- 
quired to satisfy the demands of two factions almost diametri- 
cally opposite in point of view. In making compromises the 
magazine has had to sacrifice its highest ideals and risk criti- 




CONVENTIONAL DESIGNS, ROSE MOTIF-FLORENCE MILTON MCCARTHY 

DECEMBER 1916 KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 

KERAMIC STUDIO Syracuse, n. y. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



109 




mmr 



/, 





cism from the rest of the art world . And yet, with this handicap, 
what a tremendous force for good it has been, and the stride 
Keramic Art has made under its guidance is best appreciated by 
those whose memory and experience date back to the early 
history of this craft. We ought to consider this magazine as a 
co-operative enterprise and the subscribers as shareholders. 
We need to take more stock in it. Let us try to appreciate 
more the cultural advantages of such a magazine and depend 
less on the illustrations for copying purposes. Let us strive 
to keep our place, so dearly bought, in the Art world and be 
worthy the respect of the Art workers in all departments. 
This we cannot do with a narrow personal point of view. What 
we need is more sincerity, more appreciation, more loyalty 
and a larger vision. We must be more democratic. We must 
be willing to share our magazine with others whose point of 
view differs from our own, hoping that time and experience 
will result in closer harmony of ideas and taste. 

Let us make 1917 Rally Year. Concerted effort, with the 
good of the craft at heart cannot but result in good for the 
individual workers. Now all together! 

K-E-R-A-M-I-C — Keramic Studio! Har-mo-neel 

<- ♦> *:♦ 
ENAMELS FOR UNITS 
No. 1 — Flower — Dark Blue, outer edge a lighter Blue. 
Spots and stamens orange. Leaves and stems strong, rich 
Green No. 2. 



No. 2 — Flower Dark Blue. Large drop same. Stamens 
orange. Leaves and stem rich green. Spots next to center 
Turquoise Blue. Oval drops next, Turquoise Green. Outer dots 
deep Coral Red. 

The units above in whole or in part will be found useful 
for repeats or medallions on various shapes. They are Persian 
in outline, brilliant in color and will make attractive decoration 
on white, ivory or grey grounds . They will be most effective on 
soft wares in high relief but may be used on hard glaze ware 
in low relief with hard glaze enamels. 

HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST, nee WRIGHT 

Adelaide Alsop Robineau 
Mrs. Paist took up the decoration of china in 1889 and has 
worked continuously since, doing miniature and figure work 
as well as decoration on porcelain. She has not confined her- 
self to the decoration of china but has applied her knowledge 
of design to pottery, leather, stenciling and wood block print- 
ing, and has also worked in the department of fine arts, using 
both water colors and oils. 

Mrs. Paist is well known as a teacher in all the large 
cities of the West. She was for a number of years a prominent 
member of the old N. Y. S. K. A., being one of the first deco- 
rators to break away from the naturalistic. She received a 
medal in Chicago in 1896 for the best of 108 exhibits at the 
Old Western Decorating Works (National Exhibition), also an 




no 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



Honorable Mention at the Paris International Exposition in 
1900. She established the keramic department in the St. Paul 
Institute of Art and conducted it for two years. At present 
she is trying, through her nonresident Course of Design to 
help and raise the standard of china decorating, and has clubs 
and individual workers scattered all over the States and Canada, 
one of her best workers being in the College of Honolulu. 
These Correspondence lessons have just been published in book 
form by the Keramic Studio Publishing Co. 

Mrs. Paist is President of the Twin City Keramic Club, 
numbering fifteen active members and about the same number 
of associates. The interesting program of this Club for 1916- 
1917 is mentioned on Page 116. 

Being specially interested in the problem of color, Mrs. 



Paist is studying all the time to be able to present it in a prac- 
tical and helpful way, preparing charts and other illustrations 
on a scale large enough to allow her to give illustrated talks 
to Clubs. 

She has had associated with her in her St. Paul studio a 
student of her own, Miss Florence Huntington, who has also 
studied under Miss Reece in the Cincinnati Art School, and is 
for the third year assistant to Miss Cheney in the Design 
department of the Minneapolis School of Arts, and in charge 
of the keramic department. Miss Huntington is strong in 
design and familiar with the technical part of china decorating. 
She has been particularly successful in handling enamels and 
acid etching. She is progressive and original and has received 
many local awards, also one of the Chicago Atlan Club prizes. 




BELLEEK BOWL— ELISE W. TALLY 



OUTLINES in black, bands in Green Gold. The three 
dark flowers § Old Chinese Blue, i Old Egyptian 
Turquoise. Touches at top of flowers Dark Yellow with 
darkest places Rhodian Red. Stems, f Blue Green, | 
Green No. 1. Leaves § Old Egyptian Blue, § Dark Blue, 
I White with small dots in Dull Yellow. Small flowers in 
circle the same light blue as used on the big leaves, small 
leaves in the same dark blue as used in dark flowers, "with 



center Dark Yellow. The upright forms between circles: 
flowers, the same dark blue, leaves the same green as used 
on stems. Bands at top and base of bowl in Green Gold. 
The background space behind flower can be done with dots of 
Gold. The inside band: flowers the same dark blue, with 
leaves the same light blue, with touches of Dark Yellow and 
Rhodian Red with bands of Gold or Dark Blue. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



111 




GROUP OF AMERICAN GLASSWARE DECORATED BY LAURA HOLTZ O'NEILL 



GLASS DECORATING 

Laura Hollz O'Neill 
HPHE first thing necessary for successful glass decorating is 
-■- to get glass that will stand sufficient fire to develop the 
colors. For many years we have used for decorating imported 
glass, but since the war we must look to our own factories for 
the glass we wish to decorate. To this end a few weeks ago I 
wrote to a number of factories, with the result that many of 
them were booked ahead with all the orders they could fill for 
the year. From those who responded by sending circulars I 
selected and ordered enough to give the glass at horough test, 
so that whatever information I might ha^e to offer would be 
practical. All the glass herewith illustrated as well as the pic- 
ture accompanying my next article is decorated on American 
glass. The factories and dealers from whom I secured my 
glass are wholesale, it would therefore be necessary to order in 
quantities or have some retail dealer do so. 

I had beautiful pieces from the United States Glass Works 
from Tiffin, Ohio, some jewel and bonbon boxes in plain 
crystal, the sparkle of this was equal to imported glass. I also 
had several artistic pieces in colors, viz., amethyst, topaz and 
aurora, the latter having a ground glass effect with beautiful 
iridescence. 

From the Cambridge Glass Works at Cambridge, Ohio, 
I received ebony glass in many beautiful shapes. Their optic 
line is clear and free from flaws. 

At the Mutual China Company of Indianapolis, I found 
a great variety of pieces from American factories. I pur- 
chased a number of pieces and have found much delight in 
decorating and firing them. Among these were pieces from 
United States Glass Co., Bryce Bros., Central Glass Works and 
Westmoreland factory. 

Having secured the pieces you wish to decorate get a simple 
outfit of glass colors. I would suggest for beginners the follow- 
ing: Ruby extra deep, Violet Purple, Best Red, Hair Brown, 
Yellow Brown, Mixing Yellow, Gold Yellow, Transparent 
Orange, Light Green, Dark Green, Outlining Black, Transparent 
Black, Celestial Blue, Peacock Blue, Rose Pink, Deep Carmine, 
and Special Soft Flux No. 2. 

I usually add a little more flux to the colors, since I am 
using the American glass, as it insures a glaze in firing at a lower 
degree of heat. 



After deciding upon your design, if the piece on which you 
are working has a large enough opening, your drawing can be 
held on the inside of the glass and the gold (for glass) outline 
be traced with either pen or red sable outlining brush. I mix 
the gold with Anise oil as it flows more freely and makes deli- 
cate lines. After this gold outline is dry the color can be 
painted in, being careful to avoid getting any color on your 
gold lines. If you feel uncertain about this, after your color 
dries it is well to retrace your gold lines and thereby save a 
second firing. For mixing my glass colors I use the same medium 
I use for china decorating. 

There are beautiful lustres for glass. The Mother of 
Pearl and Iridescent Yellow are especially useful and attractive. 

For the tinted and ebony glass Reusche's "Silver White" 
either alone or touched in places with brilliant enamels is very 
pleasing. You can now secure all colors of glass enamels; 
when I first did glass decorating nearly twenty years ago, in 
fact up to within the past two years, we used white glass enamel 
and colored it with glass colors. This is very satisfactory with 
blues, pinks, greens, yellows and violets, but the red was more 
difficult to control; it was not easy to get a uniformity of color 
in coral, but now that we can get the coral ready mixed this 
trouble is obviated. 

When I use glass enamels I mix them with the same enamel 
medium I use for mixing china enamels, using only enough 
to make the enamel cling together, then thin with fresh turpen- 
tine (not fatty). 

After floating on the enamels let stand over night before 
firing. 

The two jugs, located in my illustration at either side, 
represent a background of water; in these I mixed white enamel, 
using very little in the darkest places and almost pure enamel 
in the high lights; it gives the effect of opaque water colors. 
When you have glass such as decanters, salt and peppers or 
slender necked vases it becomes necessary to draw on your 
design free hand, but in this day when we are doing all of our 
conventional work on china free hand it has prepared us for 
this rather more difficult work of free hand drawing on glass. 

To give variety, instead of always using Roman Gold, 
occasionally make a piece in Liquid Bright Gold. The spark- 
ling brilliancy of the glass kills much of the gaudiness of the 
"Liquid Bright Gold". 



112 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



If it is a small design in rather fine lines it can be used on 
the glass without giving it any previous preparation. Where 
a good sized surface or very broad bands are to be done in 
Liquid Bright Gold, it is advisable to cover it with a sort 
of paste sizing that can be procured from dealers in glass 
supplies. Give this a light fire, it will shell off leaving a surface 
that will make the Liquid Bright Gold when applied and fired 
a richer, yellower color, almost like a Matt Gold. 

Acid etching may be done on glass, using the acid resist and 
the hydrofluoric acid just as we do the acid etching on china. 
When covered with rich Roman Gold it makes a beautiful border 
for goblets, or any other piece of glass where elaborate gold 
bands are effective. 

I have had letters of inquiry regarding designs for glass 
decoration. Most of my designs are original, but if you look 



through your Keramic Studio you will find many designs every 
month that will give you suggestions for glass designs. I now 
recall one of the very old Keramic Studios where there was a 
whole column of beautiful little borders, among them conven- 
tionalized ears of clover, thistle and nasturtiums; these were 
by Mrs. Robineau. They were very suitable for glass work. 

I have used many kinds of glass colors and glass gold. 
Glass colors will soon be on the market bottled in small vials 
like china colors. Meanwhile very satisfactory glass supplies 
are advertised in Keramic Studio. Teachers can procure them 
in bulk and bottle them to retail to pupils as I am doing. I 
consider firing the most difficult part of glass decorating, there- 
fore, will devote my entire time in my next article on glass 
firing. 

(to be continued) 




CHOCOLATE POT AND CUP— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

To be done in Brown, Golden Yellow and Vermillion Red enamels. Flowers are Golden Yellow outlined with Brown. Leaves 

are two parts Golden Yellow and one part Stem Brown. Dots in flowers and 

throughout the design are of Vermillion enamel. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



H3 




WHAT CAN BE DONE WITH THE SUPPLEMENT DESIGNS 



H4 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 119th Street, New York City 



KERAMIC STUDIO 

Page Editor 




PORRIDGE SET 

Black — Old Blue Enamel hard. Dark Grey — River Green Enamel hard. 

Light Grey — Dark Violet Enamel hard. 

r I "*HE scarcity of good shapes to work on has made the New 
*- York china decorator look around in department store 
basements and in all unusual places from ten cent stores and 
small Japanese shops to the wonderful china houses on Fifth 
Avenue, where heretofore we have only thought of going to pur- 
chase expensive decorated china. In these exclusive shops we 
have found the lovely undecorated Wedge wood which can be had 
in a wide variety of the most charming colorings — dull yellow, 
pale blue, gray green, rose and white. 

As a result of this searching, unusual and interesting things 
have been seen in the Exhibitions. The china decorator has 
been brought' more in touch with the interior decorator, con- 
sequently, her viewpoint has been broadened. She is not 
found aimlessly doing a cup and saucer which has no relation 
to anything else she has. 

A breakfast set of cream colored Italian peasant ware, 
was found at one of the department stores and decorated with 
a little bright enamel sprigs. The cloth and napkins were of 
coarse gray linen, finished with an Italian hem-stitched edge. 
This breakfast set when seen in the country home for which 
it was made, certainly possessed an air of great distinction. 
It was arranged in Japanese fashion, with pale yellow and violet 
asters in the center of the table. 

The fascinating Japanese tea-sets with colored glazes are 
also very nice for country homes, bungalows, porch sets etc. 
I have just decorated a mulberry set with a simple little motif 
on each side of the tea-pot, creamer, sugar, cups and centers 
of plates and with bands on edge of plates, saucers and inside 
edge of cups and top and bottom of the tea-pot creamer and 
sugar. All handles have lines same size as bands. Only one 
enamel was used in decorating this set, Dark Blue enamel, 
soft. The napkins and tray cloth matched in color the Dark 
Blue enamel and the Bamboo tray was also painted the exact 
shade of the Dark Blue enamel. The linens have a very simple 
crochet edge, done with a mulberry shade of embroidery floss, 
"Royal Society", India, color number 213. 

The English Wedgwood, which is beautiful in texture and 
shape, has been decorated in many interesting ways. A pale 
blue tea set was decorated in Manchu Blue enamel and silver, 
with just a little touch of Old Chinese pink enamels. The 




Center ornament for Porridge Bowl 

linens matched the blue enamel in color and the tray was 
silvered. As this ware requires rather a light fire to prevent 
sanding, soft enamels must be used for decorating. 

The pitcher here illustrated is part of a set that may 
be used for berries, puddings, porridge or anything that requires 
cream or milk and is served in a sauce dish. The set is of 
common yellow kitchen ware, and was purchased in a ten 
cent store; even so, each piece was carefully selected. In 
order to avoid mistakes in making selections, I will give the 
dimensions: Sauce dish, six inches at top, three and one 
half inches at base, two inches high; plate eight inches, one 
inch high, shoulder one and one quarter inch. The pitcher 
comes only in the one size as illustrated. Hard enamels 
were used for decorating: Dark Violet, Old Blue and River 
Green. Be sure to apply thinly. The design should be made 
smaller to fit the bottom of the porridge dish. The same scal- 
lop band found on the pitcher, should go on the edge of porridge 
dish and plate. This scallop edge is the only decoration on 
the plates. 

In doing this cheap ware, the designs must be simple and 
the execution spontaneous to be interesting. Never fire the 
cheap ware but once and then be very careful not to overfire. 




Foil size medallion for Porridge Set 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



m 



MAUD U. MASON - 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 




TEA SET 

THE little tea set is planned with a black background 
upon which is set the brilliant colored enamel decora- 
tion. The same decoration and color scheme could be carried 
out on a white background also, giving a good effect and entail- 
ing much less work. 

After first tracing the design, and carefully spacing the 
bands, paint in the background, using a square shader for the 
purpose, brushing it on very evenly. When dry it may be 
strengthened by rubbing the powder color into it. Then 
clean and lay the enamels, filling the spaces well up to the black 
edges. 

In this particular pot the shoulder is almost flat, making 
it difficult to indicate the spacing of the bands or lines at top 
and bottom. The waving band of white, between the grey 
lines would admit of being two or three times as wide as the 
grey lines, and would look better for being so spaced. In the 
ornament the bird is blue with a yellow wing, in which are 
blue spots. This blue is Lavender Blue Relief Enamel. Stem 
and leaves are Emerald Green. Yellow wing and centres of 
flowers are Imperial Yellow. Flowers, Light Carmine. The 
grey bands are Lavender Blue and the wider white band may 
be green, yellow or light carmine as desired. These Mason 
enamels may be retouched and fired as often as necessary, 
by applying them in thin even tones over all the design, keep- 
ing the surfaces even and the edges neat and crisp. 

ON THE DECORATION OF TABLE WARE 

WE craftsmen and serious students of art recognizing the 
tendencies of modern art, and realizing the joy expressed 
in its freshness and gaiety of color and virility of expression are 
beginning to reflect its influence in the decoration of our por- 



celain, as in other handicrafts. This has lent a fresh impetus 
and given new life and enthusiasm in the making of beautiful 
table ware and other articles for useful and decorative pur- 
poses. 

We, at last, begin to be convinced that use and beauty 
are inseparable and to think of the articles used on tables in 
terms of sets or as a unified whole rather than as individual 
pieces, and to appreciate the beauty, charm and restfulness 
attained by the repetition of the same or similar ornament or 
decoration when carried throughout a complete set. An old 
teapot, a bowl, a plate or other article loose in value if placed 
among other pieces having different decorations, and fail to 
convince you thoroughly of their charm. Indeed it often cries 
to be separated from them. On the other hand, the same 
decorated article repeated a number of times in a group makes 
a distinct and harmonious impression. 

Restraint and simplicity in decoration is another and 
most desirable quality that we are learning to appreciate. 
We feel that ninety-nine per cent of our decorated wares are 
over-decorated, and in consequence lose in refinement, and 
make the same impression on our minds as an overdressed 
person. To return to our sets, let us endeavor to make our 
decoration of them consistent with their use and environment, 
the color scheme of the room and table linen being very impor- 
tant assets. The background of room should be as a frame to 
the picture, completing and setting forth to the best advantage 
the table and its accessories. 

There is no reason why one with the most limited purse 
need be denied the joy of several different sets of porcelains 
and may not indulge oneself in the pleasure of variety in 
table decoration. Let us forget the monotony of the huge set 
made to serve every purpose and consisting of nine hundred 
and ninety-nine pieces replaced from stock patterns! 

THE LITTLE GALLERY 

A T the Little Gallery are to be found some most interesting 
-*■*- soft glazed Italian bowls. They are very stunning, 
decorated either in enamels or lustres. They vary in size 
from 12 to 18 inches in diameter, and are of a soft greyish white 
glaze, having very much the quality of some of the most beauti- 
ful old Italian pieces. 

Special attention is paid to the arrangement of the porce- 
lains in these galleries, its surroundings suggesting their use. 
For instance, a mirror black coffee service is shown on a bright 
red lacquer tray, partly covered by a very lacy doily. The 
flower decoration, with this set, was brilliant red nasturtiums 
in a jar of the same black lustre, the ensemble giving a very 
charming effect. They are also showing a very delightful 
lustred glass. A very handsome lamp, 15 inches high, is 
shown by Mrs. Elizabeth Mason, and Mrs. Vanderhoff. The 





Full sized motifs. 



116 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Embroideries of Mr. and Mrs. Armfield, N. S. C. 



The Club is planning its Annual 
December exhibit which will be held 
from December 2d to 6th. They will 
also take part in the local exhibit in 
November under the auspices of the 
Minneapolis School of Art. Last year 
the Club made a most creditable show- 
ing at this exhibit winning much com- 
mendation and honors. 

PROGRAM 

Sept. 6th — Informal meeting in the Art Gal- 
leries at the State Fair. Picnic supper. 

Oct. 4th — Business meeting. 

Nov. 1st — Luncheon. Talk by Maurice I. Flagg. 
"Keramic Art, its relation to the home." 

Dec. 2d to 9th — Annual Exhibition and Sale. 
Special feature Bowl Competition. (Out- 
side Jury.) 

Dec. 13th — Business meeting. Reports and set- 
tlement. 

Jan. 10th — Luncheon. St. Paul. Talk by Miss 
Julia Gauthier. "Art, its relation to life." 

Feb. 7th — Luncheon. Minneapolis Art Insti- 
tute. Talk by Miss Mary M. Cheney. 
"Decorative Art, its relation to Fine Art." 

March 7th — Luncheon. Talk by Dr. Owre. 
Cloisonne. 

April 6th— Gathering at theT. B.Walker Gallerv. 
Talk by Mr. Walker. 

May 5th — Annual Election of Officers. Fol- 
lowed by a Frolic. 



lamp is toned a deep greyish yellow (neutral yellow) with 
a very full decoration in copper lustre over this background. 
The design is especially satisfactory, emphasizing the line of 
the jar and having a good rythmic pattern. It is quiet in tone 
and in excellent taste and is completed by an old gold silk shade. 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF CRAFTSMEN 

INTEREST in embroideries and other branches of needle- 
craft is steadily reviving, and great progress has been made 
in recent years in the artistic development of this most beautiful 
craft. This type of craftsmanship is most delightfully exem- 
plified in the work of Mr. and Mrs. Armfield, whose beautiful 
embroideries compose the special exhibition now on at the 
National Society of Craftsmen. The work is a far cry indeed 
from the realistically colored roses and other floral exuberences 
we used to be familiar with on our table linens. The embroid- 
eries, in which both the old and modern have happily been 
combined, are most imaginative in design and delightful in 
color and evidence a very full and rich knowledge of art in its 
broadest sense. Such work is sure to prove a source of inspira- 
tion to the student of design. The accompanying photograph 
will give an excellent idea of the character of the work. 



TWIN CITY CERAMIC CLUB 

The Twin City Keramic Club gave its first formal 
luncheon November 1st at which time Mr. Maurice I. Flagg, 
President Minnesota State Art Society and Editor and pub- 
lisher of The Minnesotan spoke on Keramic Art, its rela- 
tion to the home. 

The Club has prepared an interesting program for the 
coming year, besides the regular business meetings, a special 
feature of which will be a question box. The Club has ar- 
ranged for a series of luncheons at which times local artists will 
speak on Art topics. These topics have been selected with 
a view of stirring the decorators out of their accustomed mental 
ruts in which all specialized work is apt to land us. 




See Various Steps in Motif Development (Page 1 17) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



m 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

VARIOUS STEPS IN MOTIF DEVELOPMENT 



MOTIFS ARE POINTS OF DEPARTURE FOR THE DESIGNER 

"IV/f OTIPS may be figure, animal or vegetable, and may be 
■*■*■*■ either naturalistic, conventional or abstract. The natur- 
alistic motif has its origin in nature and is used when naturalism is 
desired without special regard to the material, use or medium 
in which it is to be developed. The conventional motif may 
have its source in nature but it is so developed in form,color 
and arrangement, that it is consistent with the use, material 
and medium in which it is developed. 




CONVENTIONALIZATION 

Conventionalization is the term given to the process by 
means of which a natural motif is changed to fit use, material 
and limitations of technique. There are all degrees of con- 
ventionalization from pure naturalism to pure abstraction. 

Step No. 1 is natural motif from the primrose. 

Step No. 2 is an adaptation to cross section paper of the 
line tracing. 

Step No. 3 is a by-symmetry or a balanced motif secured 
from step No. 1, choosing the part most interesting. 





Step No. 4 is unit 3 used with application of principles 
of design: rhythm, balance, symmetry, subordination, and 
harmony. 

Step No. 5 is confined to horizontal and perpendicular lines. 

The different degrees of abstractions are determined 
by the use, the material, and medium. 

A SUGGESTED PROBLEM 

1. Select simple interesting flower specimens. 

2. Reduce same to simple silhouette or outline. 

3. Separate parts of motif, using both suggested and 
arbitrary divisions. (Suggested divisions in nature). 

4. Secure balanced unit from part selected, using a mirror 
to see balance. 

5. Reproduce 4 in border form. 

6. Reproduce 4 in surface form. 

7. Adapt border to particular form for purposes of deco- 
ration. 

Additional applications and methods will be continued in 
January issue. 

IV 






H8 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



LESSON IN DRY DUSTING 

THRACE in the design according to instructions given in 
-■- the November magazine. Be sure that the lines are 

grey and narrow, grey lines are even more necessary for this 

work than for the gold. If not grey enough take a square 

inch of fine emery cloth or double sand paper and rub lightly 

over the heavy parts, care must be taken not to rub the line 

off entirely. 

Instead of painting the color on as it was in former years, 

the spaces are oiled and the dry color brushed over the oil, 

thus obtaining a much better quality of color. 

"Special Oil for Dusting" is used. For the design use a 

No. 4 pointed shader and for bands and larger surfaces a No. 

5 square shader. Dip the brush in the oil and work the brush 

lightly on the palette until nearly all the oil is worked out; while 

doing this care should be taken to keep the brush shaped well, 

the hairs should not be allowed to separate and, if a square 

brush is being used, it should be kept flat, then paint the oil 

over the darkest tones of the design. Be sure that every 

spot is covered and that the oil is even, not heavier in one 

place than another, or it will take more color where the oil 

is heavier and the result will be that the color will be darker 

in some places than others when fired. Be sure to go over the 

lines, for the ink lines will fire 

away and then you will find 

that you have ragged edges. 

While putting on the oil hold 

the china so the light reflects 

on the place where you are 

working and in this way you 

can see that the oil is being 

applied evenly and that no 

places are missed. 
Almost all beginners have 

a tendency to apply the oil 

too heavily, it should not 

look thick and oily when 

finished, you should hardly 

be able to see that oil has 

been applied. If it looks too 

oily some of the oil can be 

removed by padding, (see 

article "A Suggestion", the 

November magazine.) The 

oil should be touched lightly 

with the pad and then the 

hand drawn back instead of 

pressing the pad against the 

oil. Pounce evenly, do not 

pounce in one spot five or 

six times and then go to the 
next spot but touch each spot 
once or twice and then go to 
the next until you have been 
round and if it still looks 
too heavy repeat the process, 
in this way one spot will not 
be spotted more than an- 
other. 



Put the dry powder color on a piece of glazed paper or a 
piece of china, newspaper or any other soft paper is apt to 
rough up and leave particles of the paper in the color. For 
the dark tone use two parts Water Blue and one part Pearl 
Grey. To obtain this proportion put out as much of the blue 
as you think necessary and divide it into two equal piles, then 
put out a pile of the Pearl Grey the size of one of the blue piles; 
mix well together with a palette knife, crushing out all lumps. 

Drop a palette knife full of the dry powder color over the 
oil and then take a new No. 8 square shader and brush the 
color over the oil with a very light touch, the brush must not 
touch the oil but just brush the color over it, continue to brush 
the color on until the oil will no longer take any. The color 
should look dry and not moist. When all the oil is covered, 
take a sharp pointed orange stick and scratch off all the color 
that may have gone over the line and straighten lines where- 
ever necessary. Then oil the grey space in the design and 
dust with four parts Coffee Brown and one part Yellow Red. 

Oil handles and grey bands and dust with four parts Pearl 
Grey, one part Dark Grey and one half-part Water Blue. 




BREAKFAST SET— M. A. YOUNG JOHN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



U9 



After straightening all edges brush Ivory Glaze over 
the entire surface, this will pick up all the loose particles of 
color. Be sure that every bit of color is cleaned from any 
part where it does not belong and then it is ready for 
firing. It requires a medium heat. If after firing the 
colors are not even, mix some color 
with painting medium, match the 
color as best you can, the mixture 
used for dusting cannot always be 
used for this, and paint over the 
lighter places until all color is the 
same, this should not be necessary 
after one has had some experience 
with dusting, for you will be able 
to oil so that all color will come out 
with an even tone. If edges are 
ragged touch in the color with a 
pointed brush, being careful to put 
the color only where it is needed and do not 
run over the painted edges or they will be- 
come darker than the rest of the color. 
•f •#> 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

1. H. N. — How can a piece of lustre be corrected 
which comes out uneven? Ihave a vase done in lustre and 
gold. The background is a yellow Pearl Lustre which came 
out lighter in spots, after covering- these spots the second time 
they came out in more greenish spots and leave the back- 
ground uneven. Can one cover the whole background with 
a lustre which would not show the spots'? 

2. You say in your last number that ivory can be 
decorated with water colors, will this be washable or will the 
gum arabic make it so? 

3. Should Green Bronze Gold be burnished? 

1. The lustre can be taken off with acid, it comes off 
very easily. Take a little piece of cotton wrapped se- 
curely on the end of a brush handle, dip it in "A China 
Eraser" and rub over the lustre and hold it under running 
water just as soon as the lustre is removed to prevent the acid from 
affecting the design. Or the lustre may be gone over with a darker 
lustre if it will not interfere with the coloring of your design. Dark 
Green Lustre would work successfully. 

2. No, the water color would not be washable. 

3. Green Bronze does not burnish bright but it is best to bur- 
nish it a little. 

W. B. H. — / would like directions for painting china so that it will 
look underfired or without a glaze. I want to paint a landscape scene on 
a vase and I do not know how to get that effect? 

Special colors are used for that effect called Matt Colors and they 
are dry dusted on by painting the oil on and dusting the dry color 
over the oil the same as you do any other color. 



NOTES 

The Art Alliance of America, 45 E. 42d St., New 
York, has been established in 1914 as a clearing house 
between artist and consumer. It gives assistance, infor- 
mation and advice, places orders and makes sales, sup- 
plies teachers, etc. Any struggling artist desiring to go 
to New York can safely apply to the Art Alliance for 
information and advice. 

Alice M. Brown of Minneapolis, who has been teaching 
for The Coover Studios in various eastern cities, including 
Williams Art Importing Studio in Toronto, M. T. Wynne's 
New York, and Helen J. Zweibel's Studio, has started on her 
return trip to Chicago. She will be in Chicago and Milwaukee 
during December and January. 




VASE— K. E. CHERRY 
O KETCH in design with India ink. Paint leaves with Yellow 
^ Green, Apple Green and Lemon Yellow. The pink is 
Rose and Blood Red, then put White Gold back of design, 
and fire. Then paint in background with Apple Green and 
Yellow. Go over design with same colors used in first firing. 
Go over the gold again. 



120 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ p AGE Editor 

1 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 



A "NEW IDEA" NAPKIN 

MANY are interested in the subject of table linens, but have 
found it difficult to get in touch with the work that is 
being done in the art centers in the big cities. It is not the 
purpose of this new department to run a sort of "fancy work" 
page, but rather by means of suggestions and designs, to be 
helpful to those who are working along this line, as many cer- 
amists are doing at the present time. Completed work will be 
shown, designs and color schemes given, as well as information 
about materials. The editor of this page would welcome sug- 
gestions from readers who are interested. Perhaps, who 
knows, it may prove as helpful as "the lady from Philadelphia" 
did to the Peterkin family. 

One of the foundation rules of good design is that of 
the principle of sub-ordination. One must have a "center 
of interest" and any other ornamentation must not be of 
equal interest, but subordinate to it. Even the humble nap- 
kin may be considered a problem in space division. Treated 
as such, we have a thing which has distinction and indi- 
viduality. One of the chief aims of our work is to get 
away from the hackneyed and ordinary manner in which these 
things have for so long a time been treated. We avoid hem- 
stitching for one thing, not that it is bad, but because it is so 
commonplace. Beside that, it is laborious, and that is another 
one of the things we are avoiding. We are reaching out for 
the thing which has beauty with simplicity, so that the making 
of it is a joy and not a hopeless task. Somewhat out of the 
beaten track is the treatment of the napkin illustrated on this 
page. In this arrangement the design, as may be seen, occupies 
the center of the napkin, and is attractive both before and after 
it is unfolded. If you will look through the back numbers of 
Keramic Studio you will find many designs which could be 
applied in this way. Choose only the simplest ones, otherwise 
you will have an overdone, overdecorated thing. By observing 
the illustration you will discover that the principle of sub- 
ordination has been adhered to, and that even in the folding 



of the napkin there is a feeling of pattern. The motif is an 
adaptation of a bit of Coptic ornament, and is full of suggestion, 
for the ceramist. One of the octagonal figures would work out 
well, used as a rosette, with bands nicely spaced. It would be 
charming carried out in blue and white, or blue and grey. 

Blue linen with the design worked in grey or oyster-white 
thread, would make a very pleasing combination. The illus- 
tration is of white linen with the embroidery carried out in a 
soft grey. It is seventeen inches square, but was cut a half 
inch larger. This allows for the very narrow hem which is the 
first step in the making. Measure the material carefully, 
drawing a thread to cut by, so it will be a perfectly true square. 
In hemming use very fine thread, number one hundred was 
used for this, and a very fine needle. The interesting finish 
to the hem is in fagot stitch, which is also used to outline the 
square in the center. This is very similar to punch work. 
No threads are drawn, and the work is done with a very large 
round eyed fagot needle. A great deal of this stitch is seen 
in the foreign needlework, notably the lovely Italian linens. 
It is very simple and is quickly done. The material used for 
this piece is the "Old Bleach" linen, which is one of the most 
satisfactory weaves we have. This is a beautiful round thread 
Irish linen, which comes in various widths and qualities, rang- 
ing from eighteen inches at seventy cents a yard, up to ninety 
inches wide at three dollars and a quarter. Of course any 
price quotations are subject to change, on account of condi- 
tions abroad. This linen has a lovely even weave, and where 
it is necessary to draw threads, it may be done with little effort. 
This is the linen one may see yard upon yard of, spread on the 
dewy grass of the Emerald Isle, to bleach. It is soft to the 
touch, and has sufficient body to be practical for table use. 
One would not choose a hard and wiry texture for this purpose, 
nor one too thin and light in weight. Having completed the 
hem, pin the piece smoothly on the drawing board or table. 
Measure accurately to get exact center, and then trace the 
design, using impression paper under the tracing paper, just 
as one would transfer a design to china. The embroidery is 
done in stem stitch, sometimes called outline stitch, the stitches 
very close together giving a cord like effect. 

Another lovely weave many are not so familiar with is the 
Spanish linen. It is a much finer thread and tighter in texture 
than the " Old Bleach." This comes in both the pure white and 
ivory. The price of the sixty-seven inch width, is one dollar 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



m 



and a half per yard. This is very beautiful used in connection 
with filet crochet. In the colored linens very beautiful ones may 
be found in the dress goods. A very good plan is to use a lighter 
shade for the napkins than is used for either cloth or runner. 
Most interesting combinations are worked out in this way. 
The question arises with many as to the practical side of the 
use of colored fabrics for the table. Colors that are beautiful 
before they are laundered, come out, alas, looking anything 
but beautiful. Sometimes colors may be set before laundering 
by soaking them for a time in a solution of salt and water. 
Another way is to boil the colored linens, so that any color to 
be lost, is largely done so at the start before making up. Much 
care must be used in making up sets in color. Be very sure 
before you go ahead with your work. Much disappointment 
may be averted by a little fore-thought. Try to plan some 
uncommon ways in which the design may be applied. Plan 
the folding with the same thought in mind. One very pleasing 
way for a small napkin is to fold in half; next fold across in 
thirds. This will form a rectangle. In this, nicely spaced 
above the hem, place your motif. This may be a filet square, 
a letter or monogram, or a bit of cross stitch or other embroid- 
ery. There is a fancy for a very small napkin for afternoon 



tea, and this plan makes a very attractive set for that purpose' 
Do not be afraid to experiment. Try very simple things to 
begin with. 

An excellent plan is to start a "sampler," adding new 
and interesting stitches as one comes across them. This will 
be a very great help in the future planning of things, as at 
a glance one may see the various stitches and be better able 
to choose the suitable one. So much of the romance of home 
making and house keeping has to do with the linen chest. 
Women of many lands and many climes have, from time im- 
memorial, gathered each, her store of linen with housewifely 
pride. In imagination one can see far back in the past the 
happy bride-to-be, busy with wheel and loom preparing her 
dower of fine linen, weaving into its fabric many a dream, as 
she sat with foot on treadle. Perhaps some of the dreams have 
clung to its warp and woof, and that is why to-day it gives out 
so much charm. Although linen has manifold uses in the home, 
perhaps there is no place its beauties are more appreciated than 
for table use. And so it comes about that this subject of table 
linens is so closely related to our work as china decorators, 
that we cannot afford to ignore it, if our aim is to have a truly 
artistic and harmonious whole. 




CHILD'S SET— MARY L. BRIGHAM 



(Treatment page 122) 



122 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 




TEA PLATE 

WHY I APPROVE OF SEMI-NATURALISTIC DECORATION 

Yes we love the conventional work, but we cannot sell it" 

"V7"0U will hear this remark from 99 out of every hundred 
■*■ of the teachers and decorators who depend upon the 
decoration of china for a living. 

A great many will say "But there is no art in the natura- 
listic or semi-naturalistic." Have such persons in their pos- 
session, a naturalistic piece of Fry's, Aulich's, or Bischoff's 
beautiful naturalistic ? Well if you have and do not admire 
it, there are plenty of the so called inartistic who would pay 
well for just that piece. 

Now do not mistake my meaning; I am a great lover of 
the conventional, all the different styles of it from the dainty 
pattern to the most elaborate, so called loud designs, but we 
have no right to say that the conventional is the only kind of 
work, that the naturalistic (in its place) or the semi-natural- 
istic are not art. We who admire the conventional can not 
force the buying public into buying it if they choose to con- 
tinue to love the floral or fruit designs. But we can bring them 
to enjoy and want the conventional by giving them the link 
which connects the naturalistic and the conventional, semi- 
conventional or semi-naturalistic. 

A dinner is formal and so must the china be formal. Gold 
and white or silver and white with a dash of color are formal, 
this we all admit; but how dead is such a table unless we have 
something with more color than potatoes or pie. Let us use 



Page Editor as a center piece a bowl of fruit or flowers and see how it brings 
life to the table. 
= The breakfast, luncheon, tea or bedtime meal are not 

formal, and for such occasions, what is more beautiful than 
china with a touch of the naturalistic. I do not mean the 
entire plate to be covered with the naturalistic, for this would 
make it vulgar, but introduce here and there a spray or medal- 
lion of roses, with bands, gold motives, etc., and see how much 
more your guests are going to enjoy their tea, etc. 

Next month I am going to start a series of short talks 
on my lady's informal china. 

TEA SET DESIGN 

TRACE design in carefully. After this is done, outline 
carefully with India ink. (The stick India ink is best) . 
Outlining in India ink is very important, for when a mistake 
is made it can be rubbed off with turpentine without hurting 
the outline. India ink outlines fire off china. 

First Fire — All dark bands and motives are painted in 
with Fry's Aztec Blue added, and allowed to stand about 
five minutes, then dusted with the same color, or one can apply 
Fry's special tinting oil, or Cherry's dusting medium, padding 
it even allowing it to stand about ten minutes then dry dust- 
ing on the Aztec Blue. Flower motive is painted in with any 
standard pink for the roses and the leaves in Violet, Warm 
Grey and Apple Green, with dark touches of Violet and Brown 
Green in darkest parts. 

Second Fife — Oil and dust entire creamer, teapot or 
plate with Fry's Grey Yellow. Wipe out flower motive and 
touch up where strength is needed. 

CHILD'S SET (Page 121) 

Mary L. Brigham 

THE outline, fine bands and boy's hair are Black, also the 
eyes and buttons. The heavy bands and two circles are 
oiled and dusted with Dark Blue for Dusting. The children's 
clothing is oiled and dusted with Grey Blue. Aprons with 
Yellow for Dusting and the wider band at edge of plate with 
Coffee Brown. 

Second Fire — Oil center of plate and lower part of bowl 
and dust with 1 part Dove Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze. Paint a 
thin wash of Dark Grey and a little Albert Yellow in the band 
back of figures. 





TEA POT 



CREAMER AND SUGAR 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



123 





SALTS AND PEPPERS 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
"DAINT panels Ivory Yellow, roses Yellow with bright 
-*- centers of Yellow Brown and Yellow Red. Small leaf 
designs done in Gold. Background may be Ivory or Mother 
of Pearl Lustre or left white, and design done in Gold. 





— ^ X 


It V*/;.? 


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7 ^ 


Y 



SUGAR AND CREAMER 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
Background is Ivory. Wide bands 
are Violet No. 2, narrow lines are Gold. 
Small asters are painted in Banding 
Blue Violet No. 2 and touch of Deep 
Violet. Centers Yellow and Yellow 
Brown. Stamens Gold. Retouch same 
colors. 




124 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FULL SIZE SECTION 




BERRY SET— JEANNE M. STEWART 

The colors used in this design are Ruby Purple, Banding Blue, Yellow Green, Brown Green, Shading Green, Ivory Yellow and 

Stewart's Blackberry. A very thin tone of Blackberry is padded on outer band. Inside this Ivory Yellow is used. 

Grey greens may be preferred in tints of background. In this case Yellow Green and Grey are used. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



125 



MAY E. REYNOLDS - - Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 

ROSE CANDLESTICK, AND POWDER 
BOX 

FIRST Fire^Outline and fill in design 
with Green Gold, paint roses with faint 
wash of Rose, and Albert Yellow, leaves 
Apple Green, darker leaves, Moss and Brown 
Green. 

Second Fire — Retouch gold if necessary, 
top band Apple Green three parts, one 
part Grey Glaze, retouch roses light wash 
of Peach Blossom, darker touches in leaves 
Brown Green and Violet. Band at base 
French Grey. 




SALT AND PEPPER 

Roman Gold design, dusted 
tint two parts Lavender Glaze, 
one part French Grey, one- 
fourth part Shading Green. 
Roses in light wash of Rose, 
leaves Apple and Brown Green. 




BUTTER TUB 

First Fire — Outline and fill in design in Roman Gold, 
band one part Apple Green, two parts Grey Glaze dusted. 
Roses light wash of Rose, leaves Apple Green and Violet. 

Second Fire — Retouch Roses with thin wash of Peach 
Blossom, leaves Brown Green, touch up gold if necessary. 



126 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



CONVENTIONAL DESIGNS (Supplement) 

Florence Milton McCarthy 
LONG ROSE PANEL 

OUTLINE may be omitted but if preferred, use Black and 
Dark Grey. The green tone is oiled and dusted with 
4 parts Water Lily Green and § part Yellow Green and Violet. 
Stems are Mode dusted on heavily. Dark tone in flowers is 
1 part Blood Red and 2 Pearl Grey. The light red is 1 Carna- 
tion and 1 Ivory Glaze. The red will probably fire out as it 
is hard to get a good red with dusting but it can be painted 
over the second time to get the required color and still have 
the quality of dusting. 

BLUE TRIANGLE DESIGN 

The blue is Grey Blue dusted on and the orange spots are 
Yellow Brown. 

CIRCULAR DESIGN 

Blue is Water Blue and the pink is 1 part Cameo and 1 
part Peach Blossom 

LAVENDAR OBLONG 

Oil and dust with 2 parts Violet No. 2 and 3 parts Pearl 
Grey. 

BLUE SQUARE 

Oil and dust with Glaze for Blue and a little Deep Blue 
Green. 

UPPER RIGHT HAND CORNER 

Stems are dusted with 1 Dark Grey, 2 Pearl Grey, § Violet. 
Green is 3 Water Lily Green and 1 Yellow Green. Pink is 2 
Peach Blossom and 1 Cameo. 

NARROW ROSE BORDER 

The blue is 1 part Water Blue, 1 Ivory Glaze and \ Violet. 
The green is 2 Water Lily Green, and \ Yellow Green. The 
orange tone is Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red. Light 
background is 1 Grey Yellow, 1 Yellow Brown, 3 Ivory Glaze. 
Dark background is 2 Pearl Grey, 1 Yellow Brown, 1 Dark Grey. 



LARGE SQUARE OF YELLOW" ROSES 
The brown stems are 2 Pearl Grey, 1 Dark Grey, 1 Dark 
Brown or Auburn Brown. The green tone is 1 Water Lily 
Green and | Yellow Green. The outside grey band is Dark 
Grey and a little Violet. The yellow is 1 Albert Yellow and 1 
Ivory Glaze. 

Border at bottom of page is same as the large square 
except for the roses, for this use Deep Ivory and a little Yellow 
Red. 

PLATE BORDERS (Page 127) 

Ida Nowels Cochran 

NO. 1. — Violets are painted in Red Violet No. 2 and Blue 
Violet No. 2. Centers are Lemon Yellow with touches 
of Yellow Red . Stems and background shadows are Yellow Green, 
Brown Green and Dark Green. Outer band and lines, combina- 
tion of the two violets. 

No. 2. — Roses painted in Violet and Grey Green for shadows, 
centers, Lemon Yellow and Yellow Red. Leaves in Yellow- 
Green, Brown Green, Dark Green, Grey Green and Violet. Back- 
ground and large panels Grey Green. Lines and band on edge 
of plate Grey Green with touch of Brown Green and Empire Green. 
Stems Brown Green and Auburn Brown. 

No. 3. — Forget-me-nots and background in Baby Blue, Deep 
Blue Green, Copenhagen Blue and Peach Blossom. Centers of 
flowers Lemon Yellow. Leaves and stems Yellow Green, Brown 
Green, Empire Green and Deep Blue Green. Lines Deep Blue 
Green. Band at edge of plate Baby Blue. 

No . 4. — Roses in Yellow Lemon, Yellow Brown and Brown 
Green for shadows. Centers Yellow Red. Leaves Yellow Green, 
Brown Green and Auburn Brown. Stems Auburn Brown. Back- 
ground Lemon Yellow and Yellow Brown. Background in Panels 
Yellow Brown. Lines and edge Auburn Brown. 

No. 5. — Roses painted with Aulich's Rosa and shaded with 
touch of Brown Green. Leaves Yellow Green, Empire Green, 
Dark Green and Copenhagen Blue. Large panels Copenhagen 
Blue and Copenhagen Grey in equal proportions. Edge of plate 
and lines the same only a little heavier. 




BOWL, ROSE PANELS— ADELINE MORE 

First Fire— Oil light bands and dust with glaze for Green. Clean spaces for flowers and gold and paint in roses with Yellow for 

Painting and Yellow Brown with a touch of Yellow Brown Green. Use Green Gold and fire. 

Second Fire— Touch up flowers with same colors and go over gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



127 





PLATE BORDERS— IDA NOWELS COCHRAN 



(Treatment page 126) 



128 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



AT THE SIGN OF THE BRUSH AND PALETTE 

(Continued from page 106) 

difference between civilization and culture." He also proposes 
clearing up the water-front of Plymouth — a sore need, as all 
who have visited the quaint old town will remember. Mr. 
Cram's art city would not be erected at Plymouth, bufalong 
the banks of the Charles River. 

William M. Chase, the veteran artist, died at his New 
York residence October 25th. Mr. Chase while most cele- 
brated as a portrait painter, won considerable notice with his 
still-life studies. The Corcoran Art Gallery is said once to 
have paid him $2000 for the picture of a fish lying on a plate. 
Mr. Chase was born in Franklin, Ind., studied in Munich, 
at one time painted in England where he made the acquaint- 
ance of Whistler and Sargent, but most of his work was done 
in the United States. 

THE BOOK SHELF 

The Binding of Books, by Herbert P. Home, (E. P. Dutton 
and Co. New York) $1.25, deals with the book-binder's crafts, 
and early Italian, French and English bindings. 

Old Glass and How to Collect It. By J. Sidney Lewis. 
(J. B. Lippincott Co., Ph ladelphia) $3.00. Gives the history 
of the art of glass making with accounts and pictures of early 
English, Irish, Bristol, and eighteenth century glass. A joy 
to the collector. 

The Quest of the Quaint. By Virginia Robie. (Little 
Brown and Co. Boston) $2.00. Contains interesting text and 
pictures of old glass, china, pictures, furniture, etc. 

Jacobean Furniture. By Helen Churchill Candee. (Fred- 
erick A. Stokes Co. New York) $1.25. Both an instructive 
and interesting little book describing and picturing styles of 
walnut and oak furniture of the Jacobean period. 




J@L— *S^- 



MEDALLIONS AND BORDERS 

Esther A. Coster 
r I ^HESE designs are planned to be placed on the colored 
-■■ wares that come in so great variety, or on china previ- 
ously tinted with a color harmonizing with the furnishings of 
the room where the china is to be used. Use rather dull tones, 
and keep the effect light as a background for the decoration. 
For the designs use enamels, dusted color or flat color painted 
freely. Have the work freehand as much as possible to avoid 
the hard mechanical appearance. Slight variations in draw- 
ing do no harm, and, if the spirit of the motif is kept, the free- 
dom of handling is more desirable than mechanical perfection. 
In applying the medallions without an enclosing line, be 
sure that the outer shape is strongly felt, as deviating from it, 
by having parts of the design vary in outline, will nullify the 
effect. Select the colors having the same relative value as the 
grays in the sketch, black representing the darkest tone, not 
necessarily dark color. 

AMERICAN INDIAN (SHOSHONE) MOTIF 

First Fire — Tint entire surface with a light Neutral Grey. 
Second Fire — Lightest value, leave the ground color. Medium 
value, light blue, using Deep Blue Green or similar color. Dark 
value, wide bands Blood Red. Narrow bands Empire Green. 
Darkest value, dark blue, using Banding Blue with just a touch 
of Black or any rich dark blue. Black outlines, edges and han- 
dles may be added, if desired. Suitable for plates, bowls or 
other circular pieces. 

(To be continued) 




i mmm 




MWWWW 




AMERICAN INDIAN (SHOSHONE) MOTIF 



K. E. CHERRY 

CHINA COLORS AND ENAMELS 



In making our revised price list of Cberry Colors, we have 
eliminated 13 enamels from the old list, not because they 
were not good, but because they were too similar to other 
shades and it seemed advisable to reduce the number of 
shades. 

We have on hand a certain number of vials of these elimi- 
nated enamels which we will sell at the reduced price of 

10 CENTS A HALF VIAL NET. 

HERE ARE THE COLORS: 

Dark Yellow E, somewhat similar to Orange No. 3. 
Dull Yellow, somewhat similar to Lotus Yellow. 
Old Ivory, a little lighter than Buff Brown. 
Antique Red, a light pinkish red. 
Dark Red, quite similar to Pompeian Red, 
Scarlet No. 3, quite similar to Orange Red. 
Golden Red, quite similar to Orange Red. 
Rose Pink No. 2, somewhat similar to Peach Pink. 
Rose Carmine, a little redder than Peach Pink. 
Yale Blue, a little lighter than Antwerp Blue. 

We will sell all these colors at 10 CENTS A HALF VIAL 
until the stock is exhausted. 



SEND FOR COMPLETE REVISED PRICE LIST. 



The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



SPECIAL UNTIL JANUARY 1st. ! 

Here are a few Satsu- 
ma pieces listed at the 
regular prices. 20% 
may be deducted until 
January 1. Satsuma 
prices will soon be 
advanced consider- 
ably. Until then, take 
advantage of this 
special offer. 

Add parcel post charges 
to your lone. 

No China Catalogue 
Issued. 

Refer to back numbers of 

"Keramic Studio" 
for shapes and prices of 

No. 89 Vase $1.00 No. 28 Te. Pot $2.00 "FAVORITE" China. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE 1 
25c and 50c Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 

COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 
JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




OUTLINING INK, 



REMITTANCES!!! 



We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO 



GLASS COLORS! 

We offer the following glass colors put up in standard 
vials and half vials: 
Deep Ruby Yellow Brown Outlining Black 

Violet Purple Mixing Yellow Transparent Black 

Best Red Gold Yellow Celestial Blue 

Rose Pink Transparent Orange Peacock Blue 

Deep Carmine Light Green Soft Flux 

Hair Brown Dark Green Gold and Silver 

Other colors will be gradually added to the list. 

SEND FOR PRICE LIST. 

THE ROBINEAU POTTERY, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Our Premium Offers 

are very attractive this year. 

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR TEACHERS ! 



A free sample to be used in taking subscriptions 
will be furnished to genuine workers. 



In sending in your name for our latest circular 

please state whether you have at any time subscribed 

for this magazine. 



KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 
Circulation Department, Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1,00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 





CHRISTMAS GIFTS 

FOR 

China Painters and Potters 
Keramic Studio Books 

EACH COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME: POSTPAID 

Grand Feu Ceramic $ 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 
The Rose Boo). 
The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room 

No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class 

Room No. 3.00 
Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, 

Class Room No. 4 3.00 
Book of Cups and Saucers 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain, Paper 1 .50 

Cloth 2.50 



SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 
One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 
Two Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 
Three Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio . 

Four Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 

Two Books ordered together 
Three Books ordered together 
Four Books ordered together 
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Above offer refers to books listed at $3.00 to $5 
Nine Books Complete and 1 years' subscription 

to Keramic Studio . 
Book of Cups and Saucers and year's subscription 

to Keramic Studio. . 
Little Things to Make and year's subscription to 

Keramic Studio 
12 Nos. Palette & Bench Oct. '08 to Sept. '09 

and a year's subscription to Keramic Studio . . 



6.50 

9.00 

11.00 

13.50 

5.50 

i.OO 

10.00 

17.50 

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21.00 
5.00 
5.75 
5.50 



A NEW BOOK 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

Paper Cover $1.50 post paid. Cloli J postpaid. 

Send card for information and prospectus. 

Liberal discount to Dealers 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. Syracuse N. Y. 



A 



K-EL-E-/R r T^M 



© 



CONTRIBUTORS 



•M. LOUISE ARNOLD 
JESSIE M. BARD 
MARY L. BRIGHAM 
ANNE TAYLOR BROWN 
ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 
ESTHER A. COSTER 
CHICAGO ART ASSOCIATION EXHIBIT 
ALBERT W, HECKMAN 
ISABELLE G KISSINGER 
MAUD M. MASON 
DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 
LAURA HOLTZ O'NEILL 
HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 
LILLIAN L. PRIEBE 
MAY E. REYNOLDS 
RUTH M. RUCK 
JEANNE M. STEWART 
ELISE TALLY 
WALTER K. TITZE 
F. R. WEISSKOPF 
VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 
JETTA EHLERS 



L* 



DEC 301916 '*) 
4, 



snal NW»' 



»*' 



JAN. MCMXVII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A riOMTHLY MAGAZINE TOR THE POTTER AMD DECORATOR- 






The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 



CONTENTS OF JANUARY, 1917 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 

Hints Abotrt Color 

Bonbonniere in Enamels 

Satsuma Jar 

Chicago Art Association Exhibit 

Narcissus Bowl 

Small Bowl Design 

Inspiration 

Plate Designs 

Japanese Lantern Flower 

"What can be done with the Supplement Design 

Beginners' Corner 

Dresser Set 

Glass Firing (concluded) 

Bowl in Enamels 

Various Steps in Motif Development 

Border 

Tiles 

The Linen Page 

Sugar and Creamer, Wild Rose 

Bowl in Roses 

Breakfast Set 

Plates, Asters and Pink Roses 

Satsuma Box 

Answers to Correspondents 

Medallions and Borders, Colonial Motifs 



Anita Gray Chandler 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Mary L. Brigham 

Isabelle C. Kissinger 

Anne Taylor Brown 

Maud M. Mason 

Maud M. Mason 

F. R. Weisskopf 

Adelaide Alsop-Robineau 

Jessie M. Bard 

Albert W. Heckman 

Laura Holtz O'Neill 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Ruth M. Ruck 

M. Louise Arnold 

Jetta Ehlers 

Lillian L. Priebe 

Jeanne M. Stewart 

Walter K. Titze 

May E. Reynolds 

Elise Tally 

Esther A. Coster 



Page 
J29 
130 

131 

131-132 
132 

133-135 
135 
135 
136 

136-137 
138 
139 
140 
140 

141-142 
143 

144-145 
145 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
152 



6 



THE OLD RELIABLE 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 




No. 2 Size 14 x 12 in $30.00 ) 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 in 40.00 ) 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. 



Gas Kiln 2 sizes 



Charcoal Kiln 4 sizes 



i No. 1 Size 10 x 12 in. $15.00 

| No. 2 Size 16 x 12 in 20.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 15 in 25.00 

1 No. 4 Size 18 x 26 in 50.00 



'e. 



STEARNS, FITCH & CO., 



Springfield, Ohio 



Vol. XVIII, No. 9. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



January 1917 




S1HE New Year sees us following the 
path laid out in our Christmas issue, 
we are living up to our promises and 
expect to do some more as the oppor- 
tunity offers. What are you doing 
to help the good work along? We 
have been asleep too long. It is time 
to wake up and pull all together for 
the best good of the greatest number. 
Keep in mind the motto "What helps 
one, helps all." It is a truth too few realize. W e shall do for 
you all that lies in our power. What will you do for us that 
we may do more for you? Have you any new idea in ceramic 
decoration or methods of work that you think would be helpful 
to others? Why not send it to Keramic Studio"! We will pay 
for it. Have you gifts to make? Why not a subscription to 
Keramic Studiol Do you know some ceramic worker who needs 
instruction and inspiration, why not get him or her to subscribe 
to Keramic Studio. When you have helped to swell the in- 
come of Keramic Studio, then Keramic Studio can use that in- 
come for other improvements — and will — more color work, 
more pages, more of everything helpful that we can find. Won't 
_ you all make a New Year's resolution to pull all together with 
Keramic Studio for the good work to go on? Let us put more 
living and real interest into our relations as publishers and read- 
ers. Keramic Studio is your magazine. You are our helpers. 
Write us what you want and rest assured that sooner or later, 
as soon as that want can be supplied, you will not be forgotten. 
We can not always answer letters by letters, but, if in the range 
of possibilities, your letter will be answered directly or indirectly 
in Keramic Studio. But no letter passes unread or unappre- 
ciated. You have not told us yet whether you would like any 
other arts or crafts added to Keramic Studio. Does silence 
give consent or the contrary in this case? We really want to 
know. 

» H 

The article of Mrs. O'Neill on glass firing completes in- 
structions for glass decoration which will be invaluable to 
beginners in this line of work; and, although the firing of glass 
requires a little more care than the firing of china, it should 
be a very simple and easy matter for people who are already 
used to the decoration of china, to branch into glass work. 

There are several reasons why this is advisable at the 
present time. First, as we have explained before, the demand 
for decorated glass is enormous and commercial factories are 
almost unable to fill orders. There is room for good, artistic, 
individual work. Good glass shapes are made in this country. 

On the other hand the scarcity of china is more and more 
felt, and outside of the soft Belleek ware, no white china for 
decorating is produced in this country. Although the situa- 
tion will be considerably relieved at the end of the war, it must 
not be expected that there will be a flood of china coming from 
Europe. There will not be for a long time after the war, as 
the European industries will not be rebuilt in a day and there 
will be many, many things which Europeans will consider more 
urgent to produce than white china for American decorators. 
Why then should not decorators devote at least a part of their 
time to this very interesting work of glass decoration? 



We realize that at first there will be some difficulty in 
finding a good stock of glass shapes at your dealer's. The 
glass manufacturers sell only wholesale and your dealer will 
not order a stock of glass until he sees some demand for it, 
but, as soon as he sees decorators asking for glass he will natur- 
ally and promptly supply the demand. 

As to glass colors, there is an excellent supply of all kinds 
of brilliant painting colors, mat colors and enamels. These 
have mostly been sold in pound quantities to commercial 
establishments, but they will soon be found at dealers' stores, 
put up in small vials, like the china colors. The matt colors, 
which give a silky finish, are very much used now for the decor- 
ation of fancy articles, such as Cologne bottles, etc., and fac- 
tories which do this line of work are working overtime. 

One of our subscribers just writes to us in date of Nov- 
ember 25th : 

"I have been doing a large order in glass all summer, firing during the 
hottest weather. If it had not been for that there would have been no busi- 
ness at all, as this seems to be the worst season for china painting we have had." 

» K 

We would like simple designs to be executed on glass, with 
tried directions for treatment in any medium, enamels, stains, 
lustres, gold, etc. For table glass, as for other table ware, the 
treatment should be simple and restrained. One does not sit 
down to the table for a "flow of reason and a feast of soul" 
alone, so the decoration should not be too distracting to allow 
a good appetite. 

K K 

We have tried time and again to get contributors from the 
Pacific coast but without result. We want all of the United 
States, north, east, south, west, to be represented in the maga- 
zine, as well as Canada and foreign countries. Won't some of 
you send us designs, art notes, news connected with ceramics — 
anything to let us keep in touch. The warring countries can 
do little now, but we must keep the fire alive to warm them 
when all is over. Japan, which has been such an inspiration to 
western art, should be generous and contribute too. She is 
comparatively at peace. 

K K 

A new magazine worthy of support has appeared, "The 
Potter," a monthly magazine devoted to the potter's art, edited 
by Frederick Hurten Rhead, who once contributed such valu- 
able instruction in that craft to Keramic Studio. It is pub- 
lished at Santa Barbara, California. Any one who is interested 
in the art of pottery making should certainly subscribe. The 
editor knows from personal experience that there is no one in 
the United States better equipped to instruct in that art than 
Mr. Rhead. It would be a useful publication for any one wish- 
ing a more liberal knowledge of the ceramic arts than can be 
obtained elsewhere in America. 

Regular contributions by Edwin Atlee Barber, the Direc- 
tor of the Pensylvania Museum on old and modern potteries 
will make "The Potter" valuable to collectors as well as to 
ceramists 

There has for a long time been a need for a magazine of 
this kind and all people interested in this craft should give it 
their hearty support. 



130 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



AN exhibition of Spanish painting by Ignacio Zuloaga, held 
at Copley Hall, Boston, the latter part of November 
has been heralded as "the most important art show of the 
American season." From Boston where it made its American 
debut it proceeded to the Brooklyn Museum and the Duveen 
Galleries, New York. The following galleries and art insti- 
tutes are fortunate enough to have secured the pictures for 
exhibition, the last to be given in August, 1917:— The Albright 
Gallery of Buffalo, the Carnegie Institute of Pittsburgh, the Art 
Institute of Chicago, the City Art Museum of St. Louis, and 
the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. It is to be deplored that 
art lovers farther west are not to see this remarkable collection 
of pictures. Zuloaga is said to have required ten years of 
earnest coaxing to consent to the exhibition in America, so 
averse is he to exploiting his own work. It is through the 
untiring efforts of Mrs. Philip Lydig and Dr. Christian Brinton 
that the end was finally accomplished. But even so, Fate 
seemed determined to interfere, for while the canvases were 
on their way to Boston via the French liner Espagne, a German 
submarine appeared in the vicinity sinking several vessels. 
The French ship escaped by heading for the Delaware instead 
of the Hudson. Zuloaga is 46 years old, at the height of his 
fame, has sold pictures to all the civilized nations nearly, and 
is being ranked with such masters as El Greco, Velazquez and 
Goya. He is practically self taught. "All I know of the 
Beaux Arts," said he, "is what I have seen from the windows 
of the Louvre." His genius is supposed to be atavistic since 
he springs from a dynasty of craftsmen who for generations 
have been armourers, decorative painters, metal-workers, or 
ceramists. Young Ignacio was intended for the foundry but 
upon seeing the paintings of Velazquez and Goya immediately 
turned to the brush and palette, in spite of bitter paternal 
objection. His present success is a happy ending to the story 
of his struggle for fame. 

A water color by John S. Sargent was recently sold for 
$2,700 in New York. It is called The Looking Glass and shows 
a tenderfoot making his toilette before a bit of a glass fastened 
to a tree in the Rockies. 

And here is still another "effect of the war:" "The 17th 
Century Gallery 23a, Old Bond Street, London W. The war 
enables us to offer Genuine Old Masters at most attractive 
prices. Fine investments. Correspondence invited. Ex- 
changes arranged. Advice given." 

The art collection of Ferdinand Keller of Philadelphia 



was sold in New York the latter part of November. The 
collection consisted of rare old English furniture, Flemish 
tapestries, Italian and Spanish mirrors, embroidered crimson 
velvet curtains from the palace of Queen Isabella of Spain, 
two Chippendale chairs once the property of George Washing- 
ton, old English and Dutch silver, brocades, and other valuable 
objects dear to the collector's heart. 

The National Institute of Arts and Letters elected the 
following members to the section of art, at the annual meeting 
held at the University Club, New York: Frederick Clay Barnett 
of Illinois, Alexander Sterling Calder of New York, Cyrus E. 
Dallin of Massachusetts, Charles H. Niehaus of New York, 
and John Russell Pope of New York. 

Do you know anything of the beautiful and original tapes- 
tries that are being made right here in America? One of the 
most interesting of the work shops where these are produced, 
says Elizabeth H. Russell in the December House Beautiful, 
is the one which Mrs. Francis Bailey Vanderhoef started three 
years ago in Greenwich, Conn. In a charming white house 
with green blinds and flower boxes at every window the looms 
are set up and the tapestries woven by skilled fingers. Many 
of the dyes are made in the basement or kitchen. One is 
reminded of the great English craftsman and poet, William 
Morris, and his absorbing interest in dying, weaving and tapes- 
try making. Mr. and Mrs. Vanderhoef long to see the day 
when everyone with a talent for making beautiful things may 
find exercise for it in an Arts and Crafts community. 

An acquaintance of mine who is doing school extension 
work in the North End of Boston, tells me that it is easier to 
teach the Italian children the rudiments of interior decorating 
than those of any other race with which she has come in con- 
tact. They have an inborn love of the beautiful that is keenly 
susceptible to color and form. The mothers, she says, will 
walk miles with their babies in their arms to visit the art gal- 
leries, so starved are they for the beauty of their native land. 
She foresees the day when there will be special officers at the 
immigrant stations whose business it will be to discover artistic 
ability among the new comers to our land. 

Are you making any of the charming little water gardens 
for the early spring days before the out-door gardens begin to 
grow? These are just shallow bowls in a plain lustre or matt 
background, half-filled with moss or pebbles in which narcissus 
or crocus bulbs are embedded. Kept moist and in a sunny 
window they will add a pretty touch of Spring to your home 
or studio. They would make lovely Easter gifts. 
♦> •> ♦ 

Did you know that Rosa Bonheur, the animal painter, 
kept a stable beneath her studio where she might lodge her 
models? And did you know that her favorite costume was 
a peasant smock and pantaloons? 

The Halsey collection of 10,000 rare prints was put up at 
auction in New York the first of November. The early Ameri- 
cana were in themselves priceless both from an artistic and 
historic standpoint. Mr. Halsey had devoted thirty-five years 
to amassing the entire collection and frequently paid thousands 
of dollars for a single print. 



CL~xsc? 




J@L— ±9— 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



131 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

HINTS ABOUT COLOR 
T AST month I started out to talk about color but digressed 
-*— ' long enough to unburden my mind of some of the 
thoughts which had been pressing for a long time, and which 
burst forth at the first opportunity to speak to my co-workers 
collectively. I hope you all read and inwardly digested the 
truths I tried to drive home, and that one of your New Year 



resolutions is to give your moral and financial support to the 
magazine which makes possible a keramic cult in this country 

To return to the subject of color, over which the art world 
seems to have almost lost its head. The pendulum swings and 
carries us with it, and we forget the clock of which the pendu- 
lum is only a part, and the two hands which move steadily on 
a pivot, pointing to the tendencies of the hour, but always com- 
ing together at the hour of twelve. 

Not so many years ago we were using color thoughtlessly, 
ignorantly, but joyfully. The results were what might be ex- 




BONBONNIERE IN ENAMELS— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 



132 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



pected from undirected emotional effort. Then came the effort 
to systematize the use of color; to study harmonious color combi- 
nations; to cultivate a sense of color harmony and color values. 
To do this we found it necessary to reduce the purity of colors 
for backgrounds, reserving pure color for accent only. This 
has resulted in more harmonious interior decorations and fur- 
nishings both in homes and public buildings, in a more intelli- 
gent use of color in all the arts. But lest we lose our balance 
and wander too far in the field of neutralized color, the pendu- 
lum has swung again, and under the influence of Russian bar- 
baric splendor, concentrated in the art of Baskt, all nations 
seem to have revived the peasant love of color, and we, having 
no primitive art except the Indian, are drawing inspiration 
from all, and are once more intoxicated with the sensualism of 
pure color. We all feel the emotional effect of this tendency 
and each is making her contribution to the revel, but, and this 
is the point of this article, we must not lose the sense of balance 
entirely which we have been at so much pains to cultivate. We 
must not forget that pure color usually needs a neutral back- 
ground in order to be effective; that restraint and judgment is 
necessary or our color revel will degenerate into a riot. The 
pendulum has swung, but we must keep our eyes on the face 
of the clock to steady our nerves and to remind us of the dif- 
ference between tendencies and principles. Try not to forget 
the eternal fitness of things, and do not paint everything in 
brilliant pure colors regardless of the position it is to occupy. 
Do not be carried entirely off your feet by the craze of to-day. 
To-morrow the tendency will be in another direction. Size up 
the situation and appropriate what is best in each new move- 
ment. Styles and tendencies in art change, taste changes, but 
a judgment based on fundamental principles endures. Art is 
primarily emotional, but emotion unchecked and undisciplined 
is consumed of its own fire. Our ideals and our convictions, 
like the exquisite body which we decorate, must be able to 
stand the fiery test. 

BONBONNIERE IN ENAMELS 

The Bonbonniere design shown is intended to be carried 
out in enamels. The ground is a deep rich blue. The flowers 
lavender, sepals, leaves and stems green, and stamens and spots 
orange. 

Mrs. O'Hara's Old Chinese Blue, Deep Violet, Dark Yel- 
low with New Green and Green No. 2, will be found satisfac- 
tory to carry out this scheme. The band on the lower half is 
in blue with green stems and lines and orange spots. The body 
of the box Satsuma, Neutral Yellow or Warm Grey. 

ART NOTES 

The Atlan Prize this year has been awarded to Miss Etta 
Beede of Minneapolis, For three consecutive years this prize 
has gone to Minneapolis and to members of the Twin City 
Keramic Club. As this is one of the coveted yearly prizes of 
the Keramic art world, Minneapolis has reason to feel proud 
of its keramic artists and the position to which they have 
helped to raise keramic art in the eyes of the world. 

The Minneapolis exhibit of local artists was held at the 
Art Museum during November, and the Northwest has been 
again reminded of the talent existing in this part of the coun- 
try. It is good to see the progress from year to year and to 
welcome new talent. 

The Art School has just been transferred from its quarters 
in the Art Museum to its new $50,000 home just completed, 
and at last has adequate facilities for developing the talent ot 
the Northwest. The Art School received the highest award 
for its Design Department at the Panama Pacific Exposition, 



and its annual school exhibit now ranks with the best schools 
in the country. 

There is a movement on foot to federate all of the art or- 
ganizations of the city, and this, if accomplished, will result 
eventually in making of Minneapolis one of the strongest art 
centers in the country. 





SATSUMA JAR 

Mary L. Brigham 

TO be carried out in enamels. The outline around flower 
and the circles under stems are Azure Blue Enamel. 
The outer space in flower is Turquoise Blue, the light space is 
Citron Yellow. The circles in flowers are Orange No. 3 
and back of circles of Jasmine. Leaves are Meadow Green. 
Dark bands are Azure Blue. 







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KERAMIC STUDIO 



133 




ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 

THE CHICAGO ART ASSOCIATION 

r I ''HE Chicago Ceramic Art Association held its 24th Annual 
A Exhibition of over-glaze decoration at the Art Institute 
of Chicago, from October 12 to November 15, 1916. During 
the past year a study course comprising lessons in design for 
beginners, and criticisms on china in process of decoration, 
has offered unusual advantages to ceramic-workers and at- 
tracted a number of new members. It is a matter of regret 
that with all the good work done in design fewer pieces than 
usual were finished for the exhibition, but the high standard 
of workmanship was maintained; in fact each year shows an 
improvement in execution and in appreciation of the appro- 
priate in design. 

As in former years, prizes were offered by those interested 
in the success of ceramic art, the competition being open to 
all club-members. The A. H. Abbott prize was offered this 
year for the best collection of pieces by one exhibitor; the Burley 





ISABELLE C. KISSINGER 
Barley & Co. Prize 

& Co. prize for the most appropriate design on tableware and 
the Hasburg Gold Prize for the most artistic use of Phoenix 
Gold. The last named prize was given to Mrs. Anne T. Brown 
for a square box decorated in Roman, white and green golds 
with nasturtium lustre background; the design showed a con- 
ventional flower in medallion form, outlined in black. The 
technique was flawless. Other good pieces by Mrs. Brown 
were a large Belleek bowl with a border in green and blue 
enamel combined with gold, attractive for its simplicity and 
nice proportions; a handled bowl, in tan, green and soft red; 
six small faience bowls in blue and green enamel; a well de- 
signed box with black bands in a geometric arrangement, and 
several good pottery pieces. 

Mrs. Isabelle C. Kissinger was awarded the Burley & Co. 
prize for a Belleek luncheon set, the decoration consisting of 
medallions, panels and sprays of interpretative flower and 
bird forms carried out in one shade of blue enamel with accents 
of green and orange. The set was noticeable for its quaintness 
and for the interesting variation of the design, no two pieces 




ANNE T. BROWN 
Hasburg Gold Prize (Box) 



MARY E. HIPPLE 
A. H. Abbott Prize 



134 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. GEORGE E. EMMONS 




being exactly alike. Other offerings were a square fernery 
in lustre and gold, a Sedji bowl with border and medallions in 
blue and green enamel, a Belleek bowl with border of fruit 
panels in rich colors, and a pitcher in copper lustre and enamels. 

Miss Mary E. Hippie of Elgin maintained the high stand- 
ard she has set in other years, her collection being judged 
worthy of the A. H. Abbott Prize offered for the best individ- 
ual exhibit. A large punch bowl, conspicuous for its rare beauty 
of coloring and strong design, a unique bowl and vase, with 
white enamel ornament on a matt green ground, two Satsuma 
vases in rich tones, and two Satsuma sets, were some of her 
choice pieces. 

Miss lone -Wheeler was worthily represented this year by 
a case of lustres, which attracted much attention on account 
of the unusual vibration and depth of color. Exquisite shades 
of mulberry, peacock blue, lilac and soft pink were shown in 
a group of seven small bowls, and several larger ones, partic- 
ularly a Royal Mulberry bowl in splash lustre showed skill- 
ful handling. It is a matter of regret that the wonderful 
tones cannot be reproduced in a photograph. 



GRACE E. MINISTER 
Acid Etching 



MARIE B. BOHMANN 



Mrs. George E. Emmons exhibited a set of tableware in 
courses, each course having a different motif and color scheme, 
though the color was harmonious throughout. The soup 
course was represented by a cream soup bowl and plate, a 
wafer tray and a celery tray showing narrow border of flowers 
in green, pink and grey enamels. The steamed pudding dish 
and tray of faience ware were especially good in design, and 
the set as a whole was characterized by daintiness of color 
and handling. 

Miss Marie B. Bohmann showed a breakfast set in tones 
of grey and orange, the design an interesting flower conven- 
tionalization, well proportioned to the different shapes. Miss 
Bohmann has been doing some clever things in etched work 
in combination with dull, metallic lustres; her handled vase, 
with its suggestion of antiquity, was as far as possible from 
the ordinary idea of decorated china. 

Unusual etched work was also shown by Miss Grace E. 
Minister, whose three piece smoking set was one of the most 




MARY E. HIPPLE 



IONE WHEELER 
Lustres 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



135 



interesting things of the exhibition. The design is seen in 
relief, the glaze of the china being etched from the background 
and the whole treated with lustres to produce a rich blue grey. 
The high glaze of the design in contrast with the matt low relief 
is most effective. 

Mrs. Rena 0. Pettersen was another who exhibited fine 
lustre work, three vases being rich color notes in the collection. 
Her plate and tile in dusted color, blue and grey, were pleasing 
in color and satisfying as to design and handling. A Satsuma 
vase in enamels and some good Sedji completed her exhibit. 

Mrs. Grace P. Bush and Miss Amanda E. Edwards both 
attained distinction in their color schemes by the use of black 
combined with rich hued enamels. A cup and saucer, in dark 
blue, orange, gold and black, a salt and pepper in orange lustre, 
design in black, a tiny vase with black stripes and floral band, 
were among Miss Edward's pieces, while Mrs. Bush showed a 
set of plates and a pitcher, good both in design and color com- 
binations. 




dent,Miss M. Ellen Iglehart; Recording Secretary, Miss Mary 
E. Hippie; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. George E. Emmons; 
Treasurer, Miss Marie Bohmann; Custodian, Mrs. Valla 
Ramey; Historian, Miss lone Wheeler. 




NARCISSUS BOWL 

Isabelle C. Kissinger 
r I "'HIS design adapts itself well to the outside of a low, flar- 
■*■ ing bowl, as the lower leaves can be omitted and the 

design pinched in at the bottom. Or it may be used as the 
border at the top of a spill vase, in which case the lower black 
band may be omitted and the stem slightly lengthened. 

I. Outline in Black, dry and lay enamels. Flower, 
light yellow with orange dots; leaves three shades of green, 
under leaves darkest. Buds light Yellow Green. Long black 
spot between leaves and triangles at bottom, Violet. Black 
bands and blocks, Roman Gold or Black enamel. 

II. Outline in Black. Flowers, White Gold; leaves Green 
Gold, black spots Roman Gold, back ground either Light Green 
or Orange lustre, padded. 

III. Background either matt Wedgewood Blue or Royal 
Blue dusted on. Flowers and buds Ivory enamel; leaves, 
Light Green lustre, Black lines and spots, White enamel. 



Vase — Valla Ramey Chocolate Pot — Marie C. Sparks 

Cup, Saucer, Small Vase, Salt — Amanda Edwards 

Plate and Tile— Rena O. Pettersen Pitcher— Grace P. Bush 

Sugar and Creamer — Marie C. Sparks Set of Tableware — Valla Ramey 

Mrs. Valla Ramey sent an exhibit noteworthy for refine- 
ment and artistic feeling. A bisque Belleek vase with soft 
grey background, the design in green and blue enamel, with 
accents of black and orange, was a delightfully "livable" piece, 
as were also her set of tableware in gold and soft blue and a 
Belleek pitcher with an all over design in grey green with accents 
of orange red. A set of Sedji plates with etched border, laid 
with gold and accents of deep blue enamel and a pudding dish 
of Guernsey ware, decorated with a bold design in cream and 
yellow enamel, were other good pieces. 

Mrs. Marie C. Sparks sent part of a Sedji dinner set show- 
ing an elaborate geometric design in gold and rich blue enamel 
with accents of orange. The design was admirably adapted 
to the different shapes and the workmanship of marked ex- 
cellence. 

At the Annual meeting of the association the following 
new officers were elected: President, Mrs. Anne T. Brown; 
First Vice President, Mrs. I. C. Kissinger; Second Vice Presi- 





SMALL BOWL DESIGN 

Anne Taylor Brown 

OUTLINE design with Black. Flowers, a soft Red Pink. 
Leaves, Green, shaded black bands and diamond 
forms in Gold. Gold centers to flowers. Satsuma background 
or dotted gold. Design could be adapted to plate also. 



136 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MAUD M. MASON ----- 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



FOR OUR INSPIRATION 

ONE of the points upon which I endeavor to lay special em- 
phasis in my teaching is the forming of right ideals in 
regard to decoration. To assist in this, I encourage my pupils 
to cultivate the collector spirit, to collect wherever possible re- 
productions or photographs of fine examples of not only ceramic 
art, but of other branches of handicraft, such as textiles, carv- 
ings in wood and stone, and other such works that have special 
beauty of design and color. A collection of this kind placed in 
a convenient portfolio or large scrap-book will be a never failing 
source of inspiration and if of the right kind, each time you study 
it, new beauties will be revealed and it will be full of sugges- 
tions for the decoration of your porcelains. 

I do not mean the reproductions should be used as studies 
to reproduce on your own porcelains, although this is excellent 
study,but that they should be studied for their beauty of spac- 
ing, line and pattern, and other qualities which they exemplify 
and which you wish to apply in your own work. 

Personally, few works of art can thrill me as can a beautiful 
piece of Persian ceramics. They show a charm and fitness of 
design so fresh and spontaneous in their conception and execu- 
tion, so delightful in color, that they are always a joy to study. 
To possess a few examples of old Persian art of your very own 
is a joy indeed. In keeping these fine examples ever before us, 
the Greek, the Persian, the Chinese, the Italian and the His- 
pano Moresque wares, we cannot fail to feel their good influ- 
ence in the improvement of taste and the elevation of standards. 

I hope our editor in chief will allow me to contribute each 
month a reproduction of some beautiful ex- 
ample of the old ceramics for the student 
decorator to study. Of course, those of our 
decorators who live in the large cities have 
recourse to Museums where such articles are 
to be seen and also have opportunities to 
study other private and public collections. 

I find, however, that these city dwellers 
do not take advantage of these opportunities 
as often as you would think. I hope these 
reproductions will be helpful, as they are 
especially meantfor those who live in the 
smaller towns and cities, who complain of 
having no source of inspiration, no opportu- 
nities to see fine things. If these workers 
began to search, however, keeping their col- 
lection in mind, they would be astonished 
at the numerous beautiful reproductions that 
will force themselves upon them. So let us 
begin to form our own private gallery of 
beautiful ancient handiwork for our inspira- 
tion. 

The photograph reproduced this month 
is of a splendid old Persian plate in the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art. The flowery ar- 
rangement in the centre of the plate is most 
suggestive of the blossoming springtime, having a charming line 
arrangement and fine spotting. Its growing, graceful flowers and 
tender fronds springing from the ground are delightful, as is the 
suggestion of timid, wild things dashing through the flowery 
growth. The space separating the center ornament from the 
border or its frame is well planned and the border itself has fine 
musical rhythm of line and spotting. It conveys a wonderful 
impression of joyousness and freedom from restraint, although 
it conforms so admirably to all these rules of arrangement that 




OLD PERSIAN PLATB 

we are fond of applying. In fact, it conveys its message with- 
out obviously telling you its means of accomplishing this. 

There is no machine-like, hard and fast, never varying out- 
line here, but every line is drawn with freedom, sureness and 
knowledge, being full of life and vitality. Add to all this the 
charm of color, beautiful transparent blues, turquoise, greens 
etc., and have we not a delightful work of art and one of which 
the reproduction is worth preserving? 




*.•** 



«••••. 



THE two plate designs are planned for wide rimmed French 
or Austrian plates, whose hard glazes require the Mason 
hard enamels for their decoration. The floral motifs are re- 
peated five times on both plates and would look well used with- 
out the narrow borders at the edge if a simpler effect or less 
work is desired. In the yellow and black scheme, the edge 
could be finished with a strong black line inside of it. In the 
lower plate the blue band could be replaced by a blue line on 
the edge with the inner line of yellow. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



137 



And for further variety with the floral motif left off the 
borders alone when repeated in a set would make a very satis- 
factory and simple decoration. This type of design is one easily 
adapted to other articles, such as bowls, jars, etc. 

In the upper plate, for the yellow flower use Medium 
Yellow-Hard or Medium Yellow and Golden Yellow-Hard. 
Black, Black Enamel-Hard; blue, Brilliant Blue-Hard; green, 



Sea Green-Hard. In the bouquet motif the enamels used 
are: Yellow, Medium Yellow-Hard; pinks, Rose-Hard; green, 
Sea Green-Hard ; centre of flowers, Golden Yellow-Hard ; blue, 
Brilliant Blue-Hard. 

The plates are retouched if necessary in the second firing 
with very thin washes of the same enamels. 




138 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




JAPANESE LANTERN FLOWER— F. R. WEISSKOPF 



TREATMENT OF SUPPLEMENT 

F. R. Weisskopf 

THE light part of the leaves is Yellow Green with a bit of 
Grey to tone it. The darker part is Brown Green with 
one-third Green added. The lanterns are painted in with 
Yellow Red shaded on the darker side with Blood Red and a 
little Yellow Brown. Near the tip the color fades out to a 
Yellow Brown. The stems are Yellow Green and the veins 
on the lanterns are in a deep tone of the color used to paint in 
the body of the lantern. 



IN WATER COLORS 

Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 
The plant is exceptionally decorative in effect, and lends 
itself to design in a most unusual way. The color is 
also very happy, the soft and varied greens with the rich con- 
trasting orange. Besides this study can be used so as to 
decorate almost any article the student wishes to use. Some 
good Water Color Paper of medium smoothness or illustrators' 
board will be the ground for the study. Draw the design with 
charcoal or pencil and when completed wash a tint consisting 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



139 



of Yellow Ochre and Rose Madder over the whole. When dry- 
paint the flowers with Vermillion and Orange at the lower 
end, a little Rose Madder will help to give the slight bloom. 
Next come the leaves for the greener ones; use Nasher's Green 
No. 2 with a little Alizarin Crimson. The same colors can 
be used for the yellow leaves, using more Yellow Ochre. 
When these washes are dry outline the veins. The flowers 



with a deeper color than the original. The leaves some with 
a deeper color and some with Cerulean Blue added. The stems 
are made with lamp black. It should be remembered that a 
large brush will give a flatter wash than a small one and es- 
pecially so in case of the background. It is well to keep the 
tints a little darker than you see in the original as the more 
water used the more the color will fade out. 




WHAT CANBE DONE WITH THE SUPPLEMENT DESIGN 



140 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




DRESSER SET— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

LESSON IN ENAMELING 

USING ABOVE DESIGN. 

THIS is to be carried out on a Belleek set. Enamels are 
not very successful on china or a hard glazed surface, 
they are very apt to chip off in the second fire. Mix the enamels 
with Enamel medium, just enough to moisten the powder, it 
should hardly hold together, and then use turpentine for thin- 
ning it as you use it. The enamel should be thin enough, so that 
it drops easily from the brush without spreading over the 
china, the larger the surface to be covered the thinner the 
enamel should be. Use a No. 1 long haired liner to apply the 
enamel. The turpentine must be fresh ; if it is yellow and oily 
the enamel will spread. If you have trouble with the turpen- 
tine fill a funnel with small pieces of magnesia packed rather 
tight and pour the turpentine over this several times and the 
oil will adhere to the magnesia. 

The principal thing in enamels is to learn to have the 
enamel at just the proper consistency and to know just how 
much to pick up on the brush. Pick up the enamel with just 
the tip of the brush, do not have the whole brush filled with 
it or it will not drop from it easily. The amount of enamel 
to be picked up will depend on the size of the space to be covered. 



The manner of applying is about the same as in wate 
colors, the enamel should be dropped from the brush, not 
pressed off, the brush should not touch the china at all. A 
drop of the enamel should be placed on the china and pulled 
into shape just a little to fill the spaces, just drawing the sur- 
face of the enamel along (the tip of the brush should not bend 
at all, if it does you are bearing down on it instead of pulling 
the enamel along.) Then fill the brush again and place it 
next to the last applied enamel, so the edges join, and continue 
this until the surface is covered. It is necessary to work as 
quickly as possible so the enamel will flow together and not 
show where it is joined. The brush should be cleaned in tur- 
pentine occasionally whenever the enamel dries in it. 

For this design use Naples Yellow for the flowers, Cafe 
au Lait for all circles except the outer one in the group 
of three which joins on the black line. The grey line is of the 
same color. The dot in the center of the flower and the re- 
maining circle are Orange Red. The black bands and outline 
around circles are Green Gold. The wide grey band and bottom 
of box are Dark Grey and Yellow Brown about equal parts, 
painted on, it should be a light tone. 

Another Color Scheme by Albert W. Heckman 

PAINT in the flowers with Dark Blue. Use Banding Blue, 
Violet and Royal Blue mixture. The circles and dark 
bands are Green Gold. Gray backgrounk is dusted Glaze for 
Green. Inside of circles is Rose, inner grey line is White Gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



m 




GLASS FIRING (Concluded) 

Laura Holtz 0' Neill 
A LEVEL is as necessary to the person who fires glass as 
-**• it is to the surveyor or carpenter. Perhaps when 
your kiln was new it was perfectly level, but try a level on it 
now and you will find how irregular it is. I always have on 
hand plenty of platten or firing boards. Two sheets of platten 
placed on the floor of your kiln will serve the double purpose 
of protecting your glass and of leveling the surface on which 
you are to place your glass. You can use small pieces of platten 
or if you need thinner pieces use firing board or if it is to be 
raised still less you can use asbestos shavings placed under 
these sheets of platten until your floor is perfectly level. The 
idea of this is that your glass will be less inclined to bend out 
of shape, if it stands perfectly straight. 

Glass cannot be stacked as we do china with stilts or firing 
board between, therefore it is not possible to get as many 
pieces in the kiln and the price for firing should be double what 
is charged for china— for instance the price of firing goblets 
or good sized tumblers should be twenty cents instead of ten 
cents, the usual price for same pieces of china. The price 
for larger pieces should be in same proportion. 

When glass about which you know nothing, as to its firing 
qualities, or the decorating of.it is brought to you to be fired, 
always put a few pieces in with it that you know are safe to 
fire. I place one of my pieces, on which I can depend, in the 
back of the kiln and one in the front, if both of these pieces 
come out with a good glaze and the stranger's glass comes out 
unglazed you will know the colors she used were not sufficiently 
fluxed. If your pieces come out straight, clear and sparkling 
and the others come out bent, frosted or in any way defective, 
you can feel sure that the fault is not yours but in the compo 
sition of the glass. 

When you fire glass for anyone it is just the same as in 
firing china, at the owner's risk. You have performed your 
part carefully and your test pieces show it is no fault of yours. 
Glass firing requires much closer attention than firing china. 
You have intrusted to you the firing of all kinds of glass, the 
one who brings them to you should take that risk and not 
expect you to be the loser of the price of the firing. 

I have been told by persons who are not experienced that 
glass requires so little heat it must be done quickly and must 
require but little oil. I do not find it a quick process. I turn 
the oil on very gradually so it is over an hour before the kiln 
begins to show any signs of being red. After I seethe least 
hint of red I place a chair where I can sit and watch through 



the mica of the door until the glass is fired. It consumes about 
two-thirds as much oil as for firing china. In firing jugs with 
handles, and flat on the bottom, you should place a sheet of 
platten or firing board against the side of the kiln and let the 
handle rest against it, it will serve as support to the handle which 
is usually pretty heavy and might crack the jug unless sup- 
ported. To protect the bottom of the jug, or any flat bot- 
tomed article, place two triangular bars under it which gives 
a circulation of air underneath and is a great protection. These 
triangular bars come in about six and ten inches in length and 
are useful in many ways. 

In firing goblets or any articles that have a heavy top and 
slender stem I usually turn them upside down. I always wipe 
off the gold edge even if there is a gold band at the top for it 
is so much safer to fire these articles upside down and the gold 
edge might be marred and it is equally pretty to have the 
clear glass edge. 

When there is a compote or any fancy piece with a rolled 
rim and the stem supporting it is very delicate, you can use a 
couple of same height vases or anything on which you can rest 
the ends of two triangular bars and let the article to be fired be 
suspended from these bars by placing the bars under the rolled 
rim. However I find many beautiful dishes of this nature 
that have good substantial standards which it is safe to fire 
standing upright in the kiln. But if the edge is not a rolled 
one, they can be turned upside down like a goblet. 

The easiest firing I ever did was when I was getting my 
glass ready for the St. Louis Exposition. There was an acci- 
dental little opening in the muffle of my kiln, in exactly the 
right place to form a torch by which I could see perfectly all 
the developments of the decorations on the glass. I could see 
the gold turn from a dark streak to a shining line of gold and 
the instant there was a glaze on the colors I could see it; but 
these conditions only come occasionally, so I will tell as well 
as I can, just how I judge when to turn off the oil or gas. All 
the glasses shown in this illustration, excepting two, were fired 
in a Revelation kiln No. 6. The other two were fired in a gas 
kiln. 

When firing glass our instructions have been to use Cone* 
022, but I have not found it necessary to fire until the cone 
bends over as we do in firing pottery. If I am firing imported 
glass I fire until the cone lacks just a trifle from being perfectly 
vertical. If I am firing American glass I place the cone in the 
hottest part of the kiln, where I can see it when looking through 

*Firing cones may be purchased from Prof. Orton's School of Ceramics, 
Ohio University, Columbus, O. They cost 1 cent apiece. 



142 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



the peep hole of the door, I use it only as a guide to give me 
some idea of the intensity of the heat. When the kiln shows 
enough red to render visible all the pieces of glass, showing 
the gold and a good sparkle of the glass, stop firing. Often 
you can see whether there is a glaze on the colors, this however 
is not always possible; if you do not see this glaze but feel that 
the glass has good brilliancy and the gold lines show well, 
better turn off the fire even if you should have to retire, until 
you have gained experience, than to run the risk of melting 
your glass. 

The second the firing is over there is necessity to cool 
your kiln quickly and yet there is great danger of cracking 
the glass, by throwing your door entirely open. I fan it open 
several times quickly (as I often have done when I think china 
has had a little too much fire) then let it remain closed a few 
seconds, then fan it several times again, by this time you can 
fan it more slowly. I have an electric light right at my kiln 
door and can see in whether my colors are glazed to suit me, 
if not I close the door and turn on the oil or gas until I am 
satisfied the colors are properly glazed. Experience will soon 
teach you exactly how your kiln should look when your colors 
are properly developed. 

All of the ebony glass, as well as the crystal pieces with 
flight of blue birds on the right in this illustration are from the 
Cambridge Glass Co. of Cambridge, Ohio, there is but one 
piece in this illustration from the United States Glass Co. from 
Tiffin, Ohio or Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, that is the stemmed 
Amethyst ice cup in the center; there were more of theirs in 
my last illustration, but either of these factories' glass will 
stand repeated fires right along with imported glass. 



DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 119th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 





Shape of the Bowl and the Pattern on the Bowl designed by Mrs. O 'Hara 



BOWL IN ENAMELS 

T> ACKGROUND, brilliant Black Enamel No. S-237. Body, 
■*-* feet and tail of bird, Rhodian Red Enamel No. S-213, 
except the light parts, which are Dark Yellow Enamel No. 
S-212. The light part of wing is also Dark Yellow Enamel 
No. S-212. The small dark spot in center of wing is Rhodian 
Red Enamel. The wide line that outlines the wing from body 
of bird, is Dull Violet Enamel No. S-217. The stems are Dull 
Violet Enamel. The stems go down into first band at bottom 
of bowl. The second band is Dark Yellow Enamel and the 
bottom band is Blue Green Enamel No. S-233. Grapes are 
Dark Yellow Enamel. Light parts of the leaves, Green Enamel 
No. 1 No. S-229, dark parts, Blue Green Enamel. The inside 
or lining of bowl, is Rhodian Red Enamel. 

Divide your bowl into five sections, as the design repeats 
five times. Ink your dividing lines. The design should be 
carefully placed in each of the five sections, and outlined in 
pale India ink, as there is no fired in outline. These bowls 
rarely ever come the same size, I have known them to vary 
more than an inch across the top and some are 'much higher 
than others, therefore the placing of the pattern or design on 
the bowl is very important and requires careful attention. 

Your Enamel should be ground very thoroughly, and ap- 
plied thinly for the first fire, the object being to get a perfect 
drawing of the pattern and to have all edgessmooth and straight. 

The black enamel background goes in the first fire, and 
also if you are a careful worker, the red lining. It always 
takes two applications of enamel for a black enamel background 
and two for a lining of any kind of enamel. The Rhodian Red 
Enamel lining should be floated in thinly for the first fire and 
for the second, using a small brush (China Liner No. 3). If 
the lining is floated in heavy, it has a dull wooden appearance, 
instead of the soft orange, wh^ch resembles so closely the lovely 
old Chinese enamel. It requires three fires to make the bowl 
perfect. 

In firing, remember the bowl must have a good size air 
chamber under it. I always set these bowls on a grate, with 
three small pieces of platten under the bowl, arranged triangu- 
larly, so as to prevent the bottom band of enamel from sticking 
to the grate. 

This extra precaution about firing may, to some, seem 
superfluous, but is suggested by the fact that a very short time 
past, a teacher who has been firing a kiln for years, brought 
to my studio, a cracker jar with pieces of enamel, and even 
the Belleek taken out all around the bottom. There are also 
many enquiries from teachers asking how to fire these bowls. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



143 




MRS. DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

DOROTHEA WARREN had long been in ceramic work in 
Kansas City, Mo., before she became Mrs. O'Hara, and 
had attained prominence while still studying with the leading 
American decorators at that time, Bischoff, Fry, Mrs. Robi- 
neau and others. Later she studied abroad with Lewis F. Day 
of London, and at the Royal College of Art; also at Herr von 
Debschitz' School of Design in Munich. After she had settled 



in New York and had become Mrs. O'Hara, she began to take 
a more prominent position and is now one of the few at 
the head of the ceramic profession. Mrs. O'Hara was awarded 
Life Membership in the National Arts Club of New York for 
what she has accomplished in the development of keramics, 
also a gold medal at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. Her work 
has been illustrated both in English and German art journals, 
such as the Studio Year Book, "Der Kunst" and "Kunst im 
Hand Werk." 

Two of Mrs. O'Hara's vases have been purchased by the 
National Museum in Tokio, Japan, and she has executed an 
important commission for the late Pierpont Morgan after an 
exhibition in London. 

She is now president of the Keramic Society of Greater New 
York, which owes much of its present high standing to her un- 
tiring efforts, doing much to create a feeling of good fellowship 
in the society and helping to elevate the ideals of the members 
in their work. She is also the present president of the New 
York National Society of Craftsmen, and a director of the Art 
Alliance of America. 

— Mrs. Adelaide Alsop Robineau 

i? f 

SERVICE PLATE, ASTERS AND PINK ROSES (Page 150) 

May E. Reynolds 

FIRST Fire— Asters painted in Violet Color and Baby Blue 
in the lighter touches. Rosebuds in Rose, Peach Blos- 
som and Pink Glaze. Leaves in French Grey and Apple 
Green. Outline the design in French Frey. 

Second Fire — Retouch asters with Violet Color. Roses, 
light wash of Peach Blossom, a touch of American Beauty in 
centers. Powder bands indicated with one part Grey Glaze, 
two parts French Grey and one part Peach Blossom, leaving 
conventionalized design white where indicated. 




STUDIO OF MRS. DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 



144 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




VJI 





VI 



m 





MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 

VARIOUS STEPS IN MOTIF DEVELOPMENT (Continued) 



CONVENTIONALIZATION (Continued) 

As this problem is a continuation of the one on page 117 
December number, the motif is the same as No. 2. 

Step No. 6 is turning a corner by combining horizontal 
lines from border motifs A and B intersecting at corner. Fill 
in one-half of corner, then by use of the mirror extending from 
C and D a balance will easily be found. 

Step No. 7 is two adaptations of naturalistic motif: A 
being a bilateral and C a bisymmetric design. 

Step No. 8 is the occult or hidden balance used to fill a 
square, circle, and elipse. 

Step No. 9 is the occult motif to fill a border. 



aei 




VIII 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



145 



Step No. 10 is the finished application of No. 7. 

A reducing glass will be found useful in applying designs 
to given spaces and shapes. The use of the mirror becomes 
a revelation to the designer as well as a most valued assistant 





BORDER— RUTH M. RUCK 





D 



TILE 

M. Louise Arnold 
Dark leaves, Blue Green, dark. 



TILE 

M. Louise Arnold 

BORDER, Deep Purple. Center, lighter tone of same color. 
Stem, leaves, lower part of flower, Grey Green. Petal 
Purplish Pink. Background, Ivory Yellow, deep. Color to of flower, Purplish Pink, deep, 
be used flat, enamel suggested. Background, Ivory. 



ARK flowers, Purple. 

Same values of different colors. Light leaves, medium 



146 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTAEHLERS ------ p AGE Editor 

i 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

THE USE OF APPLIQUE 

TN casting about for a very simple method by which to decor- 
■*- ate table linen, it is doubtful if any surpasses that of 
applique. This is so easily and quickly done, that it is strange 
more of it has not been used. All sorts of possibilities open 
up in the combination of colors and materials. One paints, 
as it were, with a large brush. There are several things to 
commend this sort of work. Of course first and foremost is 
the simplicity of it. One might be entirely "minus" ability 
as a needle worker, and still be able to make a good job of this. 
Neatness and a tape measure are the chief requirements. At 
first one rebels against anything but hand sewing on articles 
for the table. When the worker has once seen what really 
attractive things these stitched bands are, that feeling is 
greatly modified. Think of the pleasure of planning a set of 
this kind, and of being able to carry it through to completion 
in a couple df days, or even less. Another point is its great 
durability. This makes it ideal for every day use, where a 
thing with much delicate work would soon give way. By 
reason of this virtue, nothing could be better for the summer 
home in the woods or by the sea. Something more rugged 
and in accord with the outdoor life is needed here, and so this 
simple frank sort of decoration seems to fit in better than any 
other. Another consideration is that in the handling of color 
in a big way, this method seems most satisfactory. In this 
manner, striking contrasts may be worked out in a broad and 
simple fashion. 



Through the scarcity of china these days, we have been 
driven to experimenting with many new things. Among 
these, the Japanese ware with a high brilliant colored glaze 
has proved very interesting and adaptable for informal use. 
Such a set in a beautiful rich old blue, decorated with a small 
unit in bright enamel, would be very attractive for a bungalow 
service. With this, use a rather coarse grey linen, and on this 
applique bands of old blue. Blue linen for the cloth, with 
bands of blue and green, or, blue and violet checker board, 
is another suggestion. One may let one's fancy for color run 
riot here, provided of course that the riot is a harmonious one, 
as Irish as that may sound. .Because of the ease with which 
these things are made, several sets might be developed, and 
thus much variety obtained. A grey and sober day could be 
brightened up with a bit of gay color on the table. One's 
spirits would go up with a bound. In these busy days with 
most of us living at high tension, our nerves respond more 
quickly than one quite appreciates to environment. One 
comes in tired and depressed and sits down to a table which 
gives out exactly that spirit. For inanimate things do give 
out atmosphere just as surely as people do. The table probably 
sports a cloth with a "busy" pattern, which your poor tired 
eye persists in following. Or it may be that hosts of fussy 
little doilies mark each place. If there ever was a sensible 
fashion introduced, it is the use of the one oblong doily or table 
mat large enough to hold the silver, plate and all. Contrast 
with either of these a table spread with a simple cloth such as 
is shown in the illustration. The straight lines of it are most 
restful, as is the total absence of any fussiness. Add to this 
china that is harmonious, with a bit of good color about it, and 
with the feeling of rest comes the sense of pleasure that color 
always stirs. There is a let down at once of the tired nerves, 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



147 



and it becomes possible to enjoy a meal that otherwise would 
have been anything but pleasurable. 

The cloth and napkin shown in the illustration were made 
for a breakfast set. The material used is a heavy oyster 
white linen of rather coarse weave. This is another variety 
of the "old bleach," and though coarse it is very soft and pli- 
able. The applied bands are a grey blue linen of a somewhat 
finer weave. Each cost sixty-five cents a yard, and are 
thirty-six inches in width. The cloth was cut exactly a yard 
square. The bands were cut five inches wide. In applying 
these the corners were not mitred, but lapped and stitched 
across each way to form a square. The napkins were cut 
fifteen inches square, and the bands on these two and a 
quarter inches wide. It is wise to allow a good turn in on all 
these pieces, so that the danger of any pulling out is obviated. 
Baste very carefully and neatly, measuring as you work. It 
is best to turn in all edges and baste them before putting 
the things together. See that the edges are perfectly even and 
the corners neatly turned. When basted and ready for stitch- 
ing, thread the sewing machine with blue for the top thread 
and white for the under. A fine needle should be used, and 



the machine set for a fine stitch. The result is most satis- 
factory, as, after pressing, the stitching can barely be seen. 

A word about the pressing. A piece of table felt or an old 
Turkish towel over which a piece of muslin is spread, is excellent 
for this purpose. Place the piece to be pressed face down on 
this. Take a piece of lawn or thin muslin large enough to 
cover it. Dip this in water, wring out well, and then spread 
over the other. Be sure that your iron will not scorch, then 
iron over this dampened cloth until it is dry, finally pressing 
the iron over the back of the napkin or whatever it may be a 
few times. This will take out every wrinkle and make the 
piece look like new. One need not confine oneself to single 
bands or even to bands in this style of decoration. 

All kinds of interesting experiments await the enthusiastic 
worker. A beautiful set could be developed in grey linen with 
bands of yellow, with a simple crochet edge of grey thread. 
Just try a few of these things and see where you will come 
out. The editor prophesies that you will be more than de- 
lighted with the results, and that you will find a pleasure in 
your china you never had before, because at last it is shown 
against a truly artistic background. 




SUGAR AND CREAMER, WILD ROSE 

Lillian L. Priebe 
T7IRST Fire — Wash in background in panels, starting with 
*- lightest color first, Lemon Yellow, carrying grey and 
greenish tones around flowers and leaves by mixing Violet 
and Yellow and Shading Green and Violet. Leaves are Yel- 
low Green, shadow leaves and -buds, Copenhagen Blue; flowers 
Pink, centers of flowers light wash of Lemon Yellow. Stems 
are Brown Green. 

Second Fire- — Tint the sugar and creamer with Ivory, 
strengthen leaves and flowers, accent leaves and stems with 
Brown Green and touch of Hair Brown, centers of flowers, 
Yellow Red and Yellow Brown. Handles may be in gold 
if desired. 




148 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



JEANNE M. STEWART - 

611 Close-Reality Building, Toledo, Ohio. 



Page Editor 




BOWL IN ROSES 
r I A HIS nine inch bowl is done in pink and grey with bands of 
-■- black. The solid tone below band should be applied 

first, padding on grounding oil very evenly and then dusting 
on very carefully Matt Grey. It is much safer to fire these 
before painting in the roses. Use Rose, Ruby Purple and any 
ordinary greens in the design with baskets in a mahogany 
tone made with Pompeian Red and Chestnut Brown. The 
upper roses should be kept very delicate, shading into the 
much darker, richer colors below. For the latter tone use 
about | as much Ruby Purple as Rose. The lighter tone in 
the band is Ivory Yellow, the darker a very thin tone of Stewart's 
Grey. The circular design is placed in the bottom of inside 
of bowl and the rest of surface tinted Ivory Yellow. This 
design could be carried out equally well in yellows and browns. 




TOLEDO ART NOTES 

Women of Toledo interested in keramic and craft work 
are associated with the painters in the Athens Society, with 
Mrs. Josephine 0. Cajder as president. Regular meetings 
and occasional exhibitions are held. The society aims to keep 
before the public, well designed and executed work showing 
that even in small and inexpensive articles a standard may be 
maintained. 

During the last exhibition of Toledo Artists at Hotel 
Secor, the club contributed a most creditable and varied dis- 
play of which a few pieces may be mentioned. Mrs. Spencer's 
large vase of Oriental design showed strength and fine tech- 
nique as did her pieces in enamel. A large pitcher of Miss 
Caine's in steel blue lustre with a design in gold was much 
admired, the same artist showing a tea set in black and 
gold on a white ground. In Miss Esther Brinkerhoff's display 



was a Satsuma desk lamp of Adams design executed in relief 
with yellow bronze and red gold, also an enameled bonbon box 
with a nosegay of bright flowers on a black ground. Miss 
Kitchen showed a striking bowl in black, white and silver and 
in her pottery a vase modeled from native clay which had taken 
a fine majolica glaze. A note of color was contributed by Mrs. 
Latham in her pottery and some bowls of brilliant lustre. 
The jury comprised of Geo. Elmer Brown, Chester C. 
Hayes and Clyde Burroughs spoke in high terms of praise of 
the keramic work. 




MEDALLIONS AND BORDERS (Continued) 

Esther A. Coster 
COLONIAL MOTIF (Page 152) 
(Suggested by an old Sampler) 

BELLEEK is the most effective for this style with enamels. 
If other china is used, tint the entire surface a cream, as 
nearly the color of Belleek as possible. Lightest value, a very 
light Old Blue. Light value, a light tone of Old Blue. Dark 
value, Old Pink, Orange, a bright Green, or a medium Old Blue. 
Darkest value, a dark Old Blue. In the border, leave the 
background around the inner design the untinted Belleek to 
secure a more delicate effect. To secure a clear cut cross stitch 
effect, make as careful a drawing as possible, put all of one 
color in before starting the next, and clean the edges with a 
penknife. This is not attractive unless the separate squares 
are sharply defined. Suitable for table china, but too delicate 
in style for decorative pieces. 




Creamic Exhibit in Aid of Red Cross, held by Mrs. J. C. Hagan and pupils 
at Constant Springs Hotel, Kingston, Jamaica, realizing, $880 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



149 



WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



AN INVITATION 

YOU are invited to spend the week end at a country home. 
It is going to be great fun. Let us take particular 
notice of the china. I am going to make notes of the china; 
the breakfast, luncheon, tea and last but not least, a real Dutch 
lunch set. I have been asked by the Keramic to help out 
only with semi-naturalistic, so I am afraid I cannot give you 
the dinner china design, but wait, let us invite the conven- 
tional editors, I am sure they will help us out and better still, 
we will invite Jetta Ehlers to tell us of the linens. 

We have arrived at the country home. Our first break- 
fast is served in the daintiest breakfast room, all furnished in 
white reed furniture upholstered in a Grey Blue. What beau- 
tiful china! Yes, it is semi-naturalistic, and just look, the 
entire breakfast is served in individual sets and it is Belleek. 

This month I will give the design adapted to the individual 
coffee pot, sugar and creamer. Next month I will give motives 
to be used on all other china. 




BREAKFAST SET 

T3EF0RE going on with the treatment, I want to ask this 
-'-' question: Have you read Miss Jessie Bard's lesson 
on Dry Dusting in the December number of the Keramic! 
Well if you have not you had better do so right now. It ex- 
plains the process, and after reading carefully you will have no 
trouble in dry dusting. 

Trace all design in carefully and outline with India ink. 
All dark bands and lines are oiled and dusted with 1 part Dark 





MOTIFS FOR SPOUT OF COFFEE POT, ETC. 



Blue for Dusting 1 part Pearl Grey and \ part Mode. Con- 
ventional motive in enamels. Flowers, grey tones 1 part 
Warmest Pink and 1 part Satsuma. Lightest tone in 1 part 
Warmest Pink and 1 part Special White. Dots in center of 
flowers, Orange Red. Leaves in Leaf Green. Bands on top 
and bottom are oiled and dusted with 1 part Grey Blue and 1 
part Ivory Glaze, or if Gold is desired, use Green Gold in bands, 
instead of Grey Blue and Ivory Glaze. 




SUGAR AND CREAMER 



COFFEE POT 



150 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ Page Editor 

Il6 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



PLATE, ASTER DESIGN 

FIRST Fire — Outline design in Paris Brown, lighter asters 
in Peach Blossom and Rose, darker asters, Violet color 
Use Lavender Glaze for thin wash in lighter parts. 

Second Fire- — Oil and dust design where indicated of 
darker tone with one part Copenhagen Grey, one part Grey 
Glaze, one part Violet of Iron. Retouch pink asters with Amer- 
ican Beauty and Rose, darker asters with Violet Color. 




SERVICE PLATE, ASTERS AND PINK ROSES 
(Treatment page 143) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



151 




SATSUMA BOX— ELISE TALLY 



r I "*HIS can also be carried out on Belleek. All of the black 
-*- in the design is Black Enamel except the dots and 

circle in flower, the six leaves around the flower and the leaf 
form on the lower stem. The grey tone in the flower is Jon- 
quil Yellow also the light space above the flower and the two 
ovals between designs. The six smaller leaves are Grass 



Green and the two large ones are 1 part Grass Green and 1 part 
White. The line on both sides of the wide black band should 
be twice its width and of Black enamels, the bands on the bot- 
tom of the box of the same. Put a green gold band between 
the two black bands at the edge leaving a narrow space between 
the black and gold. Feet are also of Gold. 



152 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. H. — Will you kindly tell me what paint to use to give a vase the dull 
effect given to Richards china? 

The Matt colors are used. They are dry dusted on. 

J. K.— Please do not take my question as one of criticism but merely a 
puzzled mind of a beginner. In the May issue (1916) of Keramic in the "Ans- 
wer to Correspondents" one of the questions asked is: Are all strictly conventional 
designs outlined? to which you have answered "No, most people do not use 
outlines at all. Now I may possibly misunderstand the meaning of the statement 
but contrary to it all the photographic reproductions of the various conventional 
pieces of china displayed at exhibits, etc. are shown to have designs outlined with 
the exception of one or two. What is there to conventional work if there isn't any 
outline? 

The latest method is without the outline though a great many are still 
using the outline. You will notice that in the answer it said "Most people", 
etc. The idea now is to obtain as soft effect as possible so that the design 
blends in with the china. The dry dusting method is used. You will Dotice 
the lack of outline in the exhibits in the February and July, 1916 issues of this 
magazine. Very beautiful results are obtained without the outline as some of 
our best decorators have proven. 

M. L. K. — Kindly tell me whether there is a bobk published on the subject 
of Acid-etching and whether studies for same can be obtained? 

An article was published on this subject by F. A. Rhead in the July 
1911 number of this magazine and also one in the Answers to Correspondents 
in June, 1916. 

Designs could be obtained from the different teachers advertising in 
this magazine having designs for sale or rental. 

Mrs. A. P. H. — Is there any other process for acid etching on china beside 
dipping or applying with swab? 

No, there is no other method. 

A. S. — / used silver lustre in connection with gold and color on a sandwich 
set and the silver lustre came out milky. I repealed the lustre and refired a light 
fire only to have the lustre an ugly streaky milky effect. What can I do to make 
the lustre beautiful? 

There are several things that might be the cause of your trouble, either 
the lustre was old or you did not shake it up before using or it may not have 
been applied evenly. 

The lustre can be taken off your china with a "china eraser" and then 
applied again. 

G. R. M. — I notice under helpful hints by Sadie E. Allen in the August 
1916, Keramic that by drying the first coat of gold in the oven, one can put on the 
second coat before firing thus making only one firing. Can this really be done 
satisfactorily? I always had an idea it would run instead of harden on. Is 
this also true of color painting? 

Yes, it can be done. In applying the second coat of gold it will be nec- 
essary to brush lightly over the first coat in order not to lift it up. The gold 
will not wear as well as when fired twice but the effect will be good. No, 
colors can not be treated in the same way. The dry dusting method will 
apply the colors heavy enough for one fire. 

S. T. V. — My oil kiln fires rather unevenly. I do not mind it when I have 
pieces which need a light firing and others a hard one. I do my placing accord- 
ingly, but is there no way to bring a more even temperature when all the pieces 
need about the same kind of firing? 

As soon as you get a cherry red color, a little while before the end, shut 
the damper of your kiln partly, just to a point where the draft will be checked 
somewhat without bringing smoke in the muffle. This will make the end of 
your firing a little slower but will have a tendency to give a more even heat. 
The trouble with most china decorators is that they try to fire too fast, a too 
active draft will tend to make the floor of the muffle hotter than the top and 
the side toward the chimney hotter than the door side. But most important 
of all, as soon as the firing is over and the oil in your burner about burned out, 
shut your damper tight. This will diffuse the heat throughout the muffle 
and equalize it all over. After a few minutes open the damper and let the 
kiln cool off. This final diffusion of heat should be useful in glass firing 
but care should be taken to stop the firing in time. If carried too far, the 
sudden rush of heat in some parts of the kiln, caused by shutting the damper, 
might affect the glass. 

0. W. — After saved gold is in alcohol how may it be used again? I 
have kept the small bottle of alcohol clean and nothing but gold brushes have been 
cleaned in it? 

It can be taken to a gold refiner and refined and then prepared as you 
do any gold to be used on china or can be used for jewelry or other purposes. 




fl^M 




MEDALLIONS AND BORDERS, COLONIAL MOTIF 
ESTHER A. COSTER (Treatment page 148) 



REVISED BARGAIN LIST 

AT 75 CENTS PER DOZEN 

We offer until further notice the following studies with treatments all illustrated in Catalog "F" 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Elder Blossoms— Marshal Fry 20 

Wild Carrots— M. M. Mason 21 

Peacock Study— F. H. Rhead 23 

Some Color Schemes and their Application — Hugo Froehlich.. 24 

Scarlet Bean — Leta Horlocker 26 

Birds for Tile Decoration— Edith Alma Ross 26 

Poppies— T. McLennan 27 

Thistles— Mary A. Neal 28 

Poppies — M. M. Mason 29 

Apples— M. M. Mason 29 

Oranges — M. M. Mason 31 

Iris — Laura Overly 33 

Phlox— Paul Putzki 33 

Plums — T. McLennan Hinman 34 

Marigolds — Laura B. Overly 35 

Zinnias — Mary Overbeck 36 

Orchids— P. Putzki 37 

Poppy and Hawthorn Blossoms— H. B. Paist 38 

Cyclamen— P. Putzki 39 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Sweet Peas— T. McLennan-Hinman 42 

Asters — T. McLennan-Hinman 43 

Anemone — A. Alsop-Robineau 44 

Mirror — Helen S. Williams 45 

Calla Lily— O. Foley 46 

Jack in the Pulpit— N. Beyer 46 

Hydrangea — M. M. Mason 47 

Texas Wild Flowers — A. Donaldson 47 

Hollyhocks— P. Putzki 48 

Narcissus — T. McLennan-Hinman 50 

Cotton — A. Donaldson 51 

Rose Panels— Mrs. H. B. Baker 52 

Petunias— Paul Putzki 53 

Passion Flower — Alice W. Donaldson 53 

Freesia — E. E. Daniels 54 

Azalea — Margaret D. Lindale 54 

Flowering Almond — E. E. Daniels 55 

Apple Blossoms — Alice W. Donaldson 55 



Larkspur— Edna S. Cave 56 

These will be sold postpaid at 75 cts. a dozen with treatments, until further notice. This notice will be sudden, therefore send 
your order now. No order taken for less than one dozen . 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone, but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 



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KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



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are very attractive this year. 

A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR TEACHERS ! 



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KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 
Circulation Department, Syracuse, N. Y. 



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Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

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The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

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The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

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Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

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Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, 

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CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 

MRS. KATHERINE BERTRAM 

MAY L. BRIGHAM 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

JETTA EHLERS 

ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

F. B. HERRINGTON 

MAUD M. MASON 

LILLIAN MILLER 

DORRIS DAWN MILLS 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

MARY F. OVERBECK 

HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

MAY E. REYNOLDS 

ADELAIDE ALSOP ROBINEAU 

JEANNE M. STEWART 

WALTER K. TITZE 

F. R. WEISSKOPF 

MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



N 29 \mi 



.^ 



FEB. MCMXVII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



A nONTHLY flflGAZINE FOR TME POTTER AND DECORATOR- 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special 

CONTENTS OF FEBRUARY, 1917 



Editorial 

At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 

Enameled Sedji Set 

Bonbonnierre 

Bowl, Yellow Rambler Rose Motif 

Plate, Grape and Leaf Motif (Supplement) 

Persian Tiles in the South Kensington Museum, London 

Miss Maud M. Mason 

Problem for Decorative Flower Composition 

Adaptations of the Color Supplement 

Grape Juice Set 

The Linen Page 

Lemonade Pitcher, White Grape Decoration 

Olive and Mint Trays 

Beginners' Corner 

Mush Bowl, Individual Salt Cellar and Plate 

Answers to Correspondents 

Dinner Set 

Fruit Plate, Black Raspberries 

Conventional Panels 

Marmalade Jar 

Service Plate, Gold Design 

Small Motifs, Bowl and Plate Designs 

Plate Border 

Tile, Cowslip 



Anita Gray Chandler 
Kathryn E. Cherry 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 
Mary F. Overbeck 
Maud M. Mason 

Adelaide Alsop Robineau 

Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 

Mrs. Adelaide Alsop Robineau 

Dorothea Warren O'Hara 

Jetta Ehlers 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

F. B. Herrington 

Jessie M. Bard 

Albert W. Heckman 

Lillian Miller 
Jeanne M. Stewart 
F. R. Weisskopf 
May E. Reynolds 
May E. Reynolds 
W. K. Titze 
May L. Brigham 
Mrs. Katherine Bertram 



permission 



Page 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 

158-159 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
166 
167 
168 

168-169 
170 
171 
172 
172 
173 
174 
174 



THE OLD RELIABLE lEiEz FITCH KILNS 



The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 




THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




<e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Sbe'-'f& 12 to $30.00 ) /No. 1 Size 10 x ? 12 to $15.00 

No/3 Sizel6*19to. 40.00 ^ *** * - "" Charcot Kito 4 ^es W \ g" " « » f" £00 

)No. 3 Size 16x15 to 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Size 18 x 26 to. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 







Vol. XVIII, No. 10. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



February 1917 




SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! 

HE EDITOR does not enjoy greatly the idea of continual appeals to 
subscribers to take a personal interest in adding to the circulation of 
Keramic Studio. It savors too much of begging and would seem to 
indicate a failure on her part to make the magazine sufficiently popular 
to support itself without special effort. But present conditions make it 
imperative that our subscribers exert themselves if they wish to escape 
the necessity of paying $5.00 a year for Keramic Studio or going without 
the only magazine which keeps them a.u courant with every move in the 
world of ceramic decoration, and which ALONE has worked for them 
these EIGHTEEN YEARS. 

Magazines, and even newspapers, all over the country, are being forced, one by one, by 
the steadily increasing cost of publication, to raise their subscription price to avoid going to the 
wall. Keramic Studio will certainly not be forced to the wall, but we are driven by conditions 
and by the failure of our subscribers to PERSONALLY aid us in increasing the subscription 
list, to issue what might be called in the current parlance of this time of political and other 
crises, an "ultimatum". 

"We have had numberless letters from subscribers telling us how they enjoy and appreciate 
Keramic Studio, especially since the new arrangement of page editors, but hardly one has 
accompanied the letter with that support, at the present moment of greater import than praise, 
a NEW subscription besides her own. 

Magazines, the subscription price of which has been up to now $4.00 a year, Country Life 
in America and others, are announcing an immediate raise to $5.00, and Keramic Studio will 
have to follow suit, if it is to continue to give its readers the help and information of former years. 

We will give our subscribers one more chance. Unless there is a radical increase in the 
subscription list from present indications, the price of Keramic Studio will be raised with the 
May issue to $5.00 a year. All subscriptions before that date for one, or even two years, paid 
in advance, will be accepted at the present price of $4.00. If EACH SUBSCRIBER would 
pledge herself to send in ONE NEW SUBSCRIPTION beside her own before that date we 
would not have to raise the price, but would try to tide over this period of inflated prices until 
they go down and until we see if we can safely rest on the present basis. 

We put it UP TO YOU fairly and squarely. We have done everything in our power to help 
you and you must realize this truth if you have a fair mind. You owe us the help that is in your 
power to give. A little exertion, a little PERSONAL exertion, and you help us over the crisis, 
you help yourselves and you help the new subscribers, who will certainly be more than grateful 
to you for putting them in the way of receiving the help of Keramic Studio in their work. Will 
you, EACH, do what you can? If you secure more than one new subscription, that will balance 
those who are really unable to secure one, and then, too, there are premiums for extra subscrip- 
tions. 

Will you help us? Will you help yourselves? Will you help other decorators? Will you? 

We mean YOU ! 




154 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



THE Boston Society of Arts and Crafts has a plan whereby 
distinctive costumes are to be worn by members at the 
business and social meetings of the organization, thus bring- 
ing more color into the gatherings and helping members to 
become easily acquainted. The crafts have been divided 
into twelve groups based partly upon the ancient Florentine 
Guilds, and a color has been chosen for each group. The 
craftsmen will have smocks of their special groups, with the 
mark of their craft upon the left arm. Members from each 
group have been asked to make designs for this insignia, made 
so that it may be stenciled, embroidered, or applied to the 
smock. Masters will wear dark blue gowns in addition to 
the smocks. 

A list of the craft groups with distinctive colors for the 
smocks: Workers in Metal, Gray; Workers in Stone and 
Wood, Brown; Workers in Glass, Red; Workers in Leather, 
Tan; Workers in Textiles, Green; Makers of Baskets, Light 
Green; Makers of Books, Terra Cotta; Potters, White; De- 
signers, Yellow; Architects, Blue; Photographers, Claret; 
Associates, Purple. 

The accompanying illustration shows the white smock 
of the Potters, under which group the China Decorators are 
classed. All smocks are made after this pattern, adapted 
from a French peasant smock. 

* * * 

People have been crowding to the newly decorated gal- 
lery of the Boston Public Library for a month to see Sargent's 
panels and lunettes of the Judaism and Christianity sequence 
which were unveiled December 21, 1916. These murals bring 
almost to a conclusion one of the greatest art undertakings of 
modern times. In 1890 Mr. Sargent was commissioned by 
the Library architects to paint a pair of lunettes for the ends 
of the long narrow vault over the hall which gives entrance 
to special libraries, music rooms, and fine arts room. In 1895 
the so-called Judaic Development was unveiled. Most 
people have become familiar with this through the oft-re- 
printed Frieze of the Prophets. ' In 1903 the Dogma of the 
Redemption was installed at the opposite end of the hall. 
The new paintings bring the older into a more comprehensive 
unity. There still remain a few panels to be decorated before 
the vast work is completed. Mr. Sargent has been working 
upon the newly finished paintings for ten years in his English 
studio. Last summer he came to Boston and personally 
superintended their adjustment. It was not uncommon to 
see him upon the scaffolding in overalls directing the work. 
The gallery has been called the little Sistine Chapel of Boston. 



Next month there will be an illustration of some of these paint- 
ings which have already taken their place in the art world 
beside the murals of Raphael and Michael Angelo. 
* * * 
The prize winners at the biennial exhibition at the Cor- 
coran Gallery of Art, Washington, were as follows: first William 

A. Clark prize of $2,000 with gold modal, Arthur B. Davies; 
second Clark prize with silver medal, Ernest Lawson for his 
"Boat House, Winter, Harlem River;" third Clark prize 
and bronze medal, Hugh H. Breckenbridge with "Nude and 
Still Life;" fourth prize, $500 and honorable mention, George 

B. Luks. Twenty pictures were sold the first day, eight being 
purchased by the gallery. 

* * * 

The American Water Color Society exhibits at the National 
Arts Club, New York, from January 31, to February 24. 




POTTERS' AND CHINA DECORATORS' FROCK 
Adopted by Boston Society of Arts and Crafts. Photo by Melville Munro. 

The ninety-second exhibition of the National Academy of 
Design,wift be held March 16, April 22, in the Fine Arts Bull- 
ing, New York. Exhibits received February 28, March 1. 



The catalogue of the American Art Association announces 
the following free view beginning February 9, at the American 
Art Galleries, Madison Square South, New York; "A very 
valuable collection of Antique Chinese Porcelains, Ancient 
Pottery, Carved Jade, Stone Sculpture, Antiquities, Paint- 
ings, and other rare objects to be sold by directors of the 
Chinese Ching Van Lee, of Shanghai. Sales on the after- 
noons of 15, 16 and 17." 




,©L_Ji3^. 




FEBRUARY 1917 
KERAMIC STUDIO 



PLATE, GRAPE AND LEAF MOTIF-MAUD M. MAsON 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



155 




ENAMELED SEDJI SET— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



Page Editor 



Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



SEDJI SET 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

THE dark space around the outside of the flowers and the 
dots, buds and small spaces in the design are Chinese 
Blue enamel. The larger dark space in the center of the 
flowers and all the leaves in the design are Grass Green enamel. 
Light space in flower is Jasmine and the small dark space in 
center of flower is Jonquil Yellow. The wavy line in the 
borders is Chinese Blue. The stem and straight bands are 
White Gold. 




MEDALLION FOR SUGAR BOWL 




BORDER OF PLATE 





BORDER OF CUP 



MEDALLION FOR CREAMER 



156 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



AN OPEN LETTER 

AMONG the many inquiries which have come to me as a 
result of my published lessons in Keramic Studio are 
some from little groups of Keramic students — not yet closely 
organized into clubs, who realize the need of instruction and 
who feel that they might benefit more by banding together 
for a definite course of study than by pursuing their individ- 
ual efforts. 

Some of these groups are already registered for the course 
in design and are doing satisfactory work, but for the bene- 
fit of others who are contemplating instruction or for some 
with whom the thought has not as yet become concrete I 
would suggest some of the practical benefits of concerted study. 
There are many isolated workers all over the country, who, 
not having the opportunity for personal instruction of Art 
School or Studio have availed themselves of the opportunity 
offered in my non-resident course in design. The results have 
in the main been most gratifying — we have demonstrated 
that the principles of Design can be presented and the exer- 
cises satisfactorily worked out on paper. We scarcely miss 
the personal contact in these lessons, so definite and intimate 
do they become. But how much more of benefit and of 
pleasure might some of these individual workers derive from 
the work if they could show their efforts with the criticisms 
to others similarly interested and discuss and compare results. 

It is difficult to hold a large club together for a long period, 
but these little groups of three to six are not so unwieldy 
and we are having the best chats over our work and accom- 
plishing results. Clubs and groups send fewer designs per 
member for criticism than do individual workers; but the 
combined lesson of the group makes a nice bunch of designs 
for all to look over and discuss and compare; and all get the 
benefit of the criticism of the whole, while the cost to each is 
much less than for isolated workers. 

Every now and then I am confronted by a design in 
Keramic Studio from some of these students who, I know, 
have had no other instruction than the work of this course, 
and it always fills me with a glow of satisfaction. Ker- 
amic Studio, by putting these lessons in text book form has 
made it possible for me to reach and help many more than 
formerly and I have long felt that I could render more perma- 
nent service to Keramic students by trying to help them to 




understand and demonstrate fundamentals, than by teaching 
the methods of applying decoration to porcelain. Design 
is another word for Creation, and an understanding of the 
laws of Design opens up a world of possibilities. It simplifies 
every problem, adds zest to life by opening the eyes to beauties 
to which we were blind. It is the answer to our questions, 
it substitutes knowledge for feeling, order for chaos, dignity 
for triviality, refinement for vulgarity. Is is not worth while? 




SECTION OF BONBONNIERE 



BONBONNIERE 

THE design is an all-over pattern made by combining two 
Persian units. Carried out according to the treatment 
given it will be effective and ornamental. In the treatment of 
bonbonnieres and all articles not intended^ expressly, for the 
table we have more latitude than for those things which are 
strictly for table service. They may be considered as partly 
ornamental and give opportunity for elaborate and decorative 
patterns and liberty as to color. This, because there is to be 
but one of a kind- — and the background and environment is 
usually quite different from those articles designed for table 
use. This is one of the places where we are on safe ground 
when adding our contribution to the present color carnival. 

COVER 

Ground, Old Ivory. Tulip shaped flowers, Persian Red. 
Stamens, Orange. Leaves to tulip shaped flowers, Emerald 
Green, New Green. Three petal flowers, Deep Blue. Leaves 
to three petal flowers, Rich Green No. 2. Centers three petal 
flowers, Orange. Centers in two lower flowers Orange and 
Green. Dots, Orange (Dark Yellow Green). Areas used as 
"fillers" Green No. 2. 

BOX 

Path, Old Ivory. Dots, Orange. Large flower units, 
Persian Red. Small flower units, Deep Blue. Centers, Green. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



157 




LOCAL ART NOTES 



HALF SECTION OF COVER TO BONBONNTERE 



The Twin City Keramic Club held a most successful 
exhibit in December from the 4th to the 9th. The exhibit 
comprised the latest and best work of the club members be- 
sides a generous sprinkling of small salable articles. An 
interesting feature was the bowl competition. The bowl 
chosen was a medium sized Belleek Bowl and it was interest- 
ing to note the different treatment accorded by the individual 
workers. The jury selected Mrs. Arch Coleman's bowl for 
first award, Mrs. Lavel's second and Mrs. Reed's third, 
all three being comparatively new members. The result was 
particularly gratifying to all and encouraging to the newer 
members. The club is drawing to itself new members all 
the time and bids fair to become one of the strongest Keramic 
organizations in the country. 

The December exhibit at the Minneapolis Art Institute 
comprised a selected exhibition of 350 items of contemporary 
French and Belgian painting and sculpture from the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition. The institute has recently 
acquired an important collection of about five thousand (5,000) 
etchings, engravings, lithographs and wood cuts which ranks 
among the great collections of this country. It includes 
Rembrandt's famous masterpiece: "Christ healing the Sick" 
called the "Hundred Guilder Print." 

In November the Institute openedto the public its new 
Egyptian gallery, which contains one of the most complete 
collections of Egyptian Art and curios in this country. 

BOWL, YELLOW RAMBLER ROSE MOTIF 

Mary F. Overbeck 

TINT bowl with Ivory and fire. Flowers Pumpkin Yel- 
low. Centers of flowers Violet for Grapes and Ruby. 
Leaves and band at the top of bowl Olive Green with Yellow 
Brown and Black. Background a lighter tone of same color 
as leaves. Outline all in Gold. 




BOWL, YELLOW RAMBLER ROSE MOTIF— MARY F. OVERBECK 



158 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MAUD M. MASON ----- 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



FOR OUR INSPIRATION 

THE group of beautiful old Persian tiles given this month 
for the inspiration of our ceramic workers, I have found 
a great source of joy. These photographs I took myself some 
years ago from a wonderful group of tiles in the South Kensing- 
ton Museum in London. I know of no museum that has so 
much to offer the ceramic worker as has the Indian section of 
this one, it being crowded with beautiful examples of the 
ceramic art. 

Every corner of these tiles is full of suggestions and the 
spirited movement of the lines conveys a sense of gayety and 
delight in pattern making that is fascinating. The light and 
dark of these designs is also very fine, the back-ground spacing 



playing a very important part in the delightful whole. I 
hope they will give as much pleasure to others as they have 
to me. 

A late letter from Miss Mason says "This has been the 
best selling season that I have ever experienced in all my years 
of work in ceramics. This ought to be encouraging for us all." 

M M 

PLATE, GRAPE AND LEAF MOTIF (Supplement) 

IF the black background is used, first trace design and paint 
in background with best black paint. When dry it may 
be dusted with same color to strengthen it. Then lay enamels 
in smooth flat tones, for the greens using equal parts Mason's 
Emerald Green and Oriental Turquoise relief enamels. Grapes 
are Madder and Light Carmine enamels, equal parts. The 
Yellow is Orange enamel. 




PLATE, GRAPE AND LEAF MOTIF 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



159 





PERSIAN TILES IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM, LONDON 




FULL SIZE CENTER OF PLATE 



160 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MISS MAUD M. MASON 

MISS Maud M. Mason's training as an artist commenced 
at the early age of eleven years. She received the 
usual academic training in drawing, and painting — in oil, 
water color, etc., and also prepared herself in a normal school 
as a teacher of design. All this transpired before she ever 
began to paint china, ("how she loathes the term now") and 
has formed an invaluable background for that and all her work. 

The opportunity for making money as well as a love of 
beautiful things turned her attention in this direction. Then 
followed a steady grind for many years, when she worked like 
a slave but gained for herself great success in a financial way, 
still always seizing every opportunity of special study. 

The work she was doing on porcelain fell so far short of 
her ideals, that for the sake of her own self respect and of 
course not being devoid of ambition, she determined that she 
could and would do something fine and something that would 
make her craft command the artist's attention. She has 
been credited with being the first decorator to join Mr. Dow's 
class and to come under his influence. She was fortunate in 
being a pupil of^Mr. Dow for several years and always speaks 
with warm^appreciation of the valuable training she had from 
him. She has worked beside with Mr. Wm. M. Chase, Mr. 
Henry B. Snell and Mr. Frank Brangwyn. 

Realizing that constant teaching is not conducive to 
healthful growth either mentally or physically, for the past 
eight or ten years she has given all her summers to painting 
out of doors and also endeavors even during her busiest winters 
to paint in the studio. When she gets back into the swing 
of ceramic work after this interval, she finds it more absorbing 
than ever and works with renewed and refreshed interest and 
feels that she does better for the change of work and thought. 

She is interested and active in many phases of art endeavor, 
being a member of the National Arts Club, (life member) an 
active member of the Mac-Dowell Club, Barnard Club, Muni- 
cipal Art Society, The Pen & Brush Club, the Art Workers 
Club, National Society of Craftsmen, Boston Arts & Crafts 
and the Association of Women Painters and Sculptors of which 



organization she has the honor of having been the president 
for the past five years. She has been active for years in the 
work of the Craftsmen and Ceramic Societies, and although 
she has been obliged to drop some of this work in favor of 
Association work, her interest is always with the Craftsmen. 
She was happy in receiving the Panama-Pacific Gold Medal 
for her small group of decorated porcelains, and she is con- 
stantly studying and working to develop her favorite craft. 
Her greatest interest is in disseminating knowledge of design 
and art principles and she has done real missionary work for 
the advancement of the cause of Ceramics. 

One of her greatest pleasures and sources of satisfaction is 
the work she has been for some years doing in the Fawcett 
School of Industrial Art of Newark, N. J. The class there 
was the first attempt ever made to teach the principles of 
design and the practical decoration of porcelain hand in hand, 
in a large class and the results have surely justified the effort 
it has entailed. Another source of gratification is the fact 
that the pupils who used to come to study with her, or rather 
have her paint articles for them, now come to study design 
and make their own designs for the articles they decorate. 
Although she designs many articles for pupils, she encourages 
the former method of study and is meeting with great success 
in that direction. — Adelaide Alsop Robineau. 

NOTE BY MISS MASON. 

"My sister Elizabeth has always been my right hand and 
my greatest help and inspiration. I could never have accom- 
plished anything nor could I do the work I am accomplishing 
to-day but for her assistance; her unusually discriminating 
good taste and criticism is always at my command and she 
is always at hand to help me in my studio." 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



161 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 




PROBLEM FOR DECORATIVE FLOWER COMPOSITION 

No. 1. Select plant form to be used as a motif having 
a simple structure. 

No. 2. Either a circle or an oblong may be used as the 
inclosing form. 

No. 3. Select center of interest — decide location: neither 
an exact center nor one far removed; also size and treatment 
of unit. 

No. 4. Give careful attention to subordinate spots, 
their location and treatment. 

No. 5. Note spots of interest in relation to hue, notan 
and chroma. 

No. 6. The following "Golden Rules" may be observed 
in this problem as well as in others: 

a — Avoid exact center and center lines bounding the 
composition. 

b — Avoid corners and strong movement towards them. 
c — Break space strongly enough to give feeling of 
security. 

d — Fill space well — without crowding, 
e— Do not lose characteristics of plant form; empha- 
size decorative quality — not realism. 
(Continued to pagc'170) 




162 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




ADAPTATIONS OF THE COLOR SUPPLEMENT— MRS. ADELAIDE ALSOP . ROBINEAU 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



163 



DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 19th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



GRAPE JUICE SET 

Dorothea Warren 0' Hara 

OUTLINE with a pen entire design with Warren O'Hara 
Color Co.'s Dark Brown color. The leaves and ground 
are made of Green No. 1 enamel. The little flowers on the 
ground are made of Celestial Blue enamel with Light Yellow 
enamel centers. The skirt is made of Italian Pink enamel, 
the scallops on skirt are Light Yellow enamel. The dark part 
of girl's bodice is made of Celestial Blue enamel. Light part 
of sleeves is Light Yellow enamel. The little ruffles on sleeves 
are Celestial Blue enamel. The bow at the neck is made of 
Italian Pink enamel, also the dark part of head dress. The 
light part of head dress is made of Light Yellow enamel. 



— : :: i 



. ._ 






The Keramic Society of greater New York offers the 
following courses at the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory, 77th Street and Central Park West, New York City, 
on Wednesdays from 1.30 to 4.00 p. m. 

Beginning with the first Wednesday in January, 1917, 
Mr. Fry will give a course of 16 lessons. 

The work will be arranged in two parallel courses: one 
in which Design will be considered with especial reference 
to overglaze keramics, the other one dealing with keramics 
and kindred forms of handwork in their relation to each other 
and to the broad field of Table Decoration. 

At each lesson both of these subjects will be considered, 
so that those interested only in Keramics, and others desiring 
to specialize in the study of Table Decoration, may all be 
kept continuously occupied. 

This course is to be followed by an exhibition. 



The boy's jacket is Celestial Blue enamel. The shirt is 
made of Reamhite, also the stockings. The trousers are made 
of Light Yellow. Bands at bottom of trousers, also ornament 
on side are made of Italian Pink. The boy's hat is of Ital- 
ian Pink with Celestial Blue enamel bands. . Hair and shoes 
of both girl and boy are made of Brown enamel, also the boy's 
girdle, and dark part of accordeon. 

The large flowers in bouquet are made of Blush Pink 
enamel. The leaves of Green No. 1 enamel. The little dark 
flowers are Celestial Blue enamel. The paper around the 
bouquet is made of Reamhite enamel. The flowers growing 
at the sides are made of Italian Pink enamel for the light ones 
and Celestial Blue enamel for the darker ones. The centers 
are Light Yellow. The faces and hands have a very light 
wash of Old Chinese Pink. All the bands are made of Celes- 
tial Blue enamel. 




FULL SIZE MEDALLION 



164 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS ------ Page Editor 

18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

ONE of the interesting ways in which the decoration of 
linens for the table may be varied, is by the introduc- 
tion of lace. This may be used as a finish to the edge, in bands 
of insertion, or as an inset medallion. To be in keeping with 
the spirit of these things, any lace used should be handmade. 
For this purpose the filet is very popular at present. This 
may be the crocheted filet with which we are all so familiar, 
or the Italian which is made in quite a different way. Such 
very charming squares are to be had with all sorts of quaint 
animals and birds. The edgings and insertion are also very 
good. They are not what one would call inexpensive. How- 
ever, if one wished to "plunge" a bit on a specially nice set, 
any money spent for this is well invested as it wears like iron. 
In the illustration is shown the cloth and a napkin of a four 
o'clock tea set which has these little filet squares inset. This 
set was made for a little lady whose name is familiar to most 
readers of Keramic Studio, but whose work as a ceramist has 
been swallowed up by the happy business of home and garden. 
It is rather droll that a fondness for pussy-cats is offset by a 
husband whose hobby is birds. So in this little set both find 
expression, pussy being bravely set forth in the tea cloth cor- 
ners, with the little birdlings safe by themselves on the napkins. 
The Italian fagot stitch was used in connection with the 
filet, and sewed to hold together the arrangement of the squares. 
Iu planning the napkins only one square was used on each. 
There were two reasons for this. Firstly, a limited number 
of the squares, which are not so easy to procure. Then too, 
the fact that the napkin was very small made it wise to avoid 
any overcrowding of it. The edge is the simplest single stitch 
crochet with a picot every tenth stitch. For this Barbour's 
oyster white thread No. 35 was used and a thread drawn 
about an eighth of an inch from the edge of the linen. The 
edge was then rolled and for convenience basted with a long 
loose overhand stitch. It is not absolutely necessary to do 
this, but time is saved in the end as the work is done with 
much greater ease. The drawn thread gives a good hold for 
the crochet. The squares were basted in place very carefully, 
and then overhanded on the right side with a very fine needle 
and number one hundred thread. The linen was then cut 
away from the back, leaving just enough at the edge of the 
square to roll back and overcast very finely. This makes a 



very durable finish. The cloth is one yard square and the 
napkins were cut twelve inches. The linen used is the Old 
Bleach, one yard wide, and costing one dollar and a quarter 
per yard. The oyster white thread matches the thread of 
the filet squares, and makes a very pleasing contrast with the 
pure white of the linen. At the recent exhibition of the Arts 
and Crafts Society of New York at the National Arts Club, 
a very beautiful table cloth combining filet and linen was shown. 
This had an inset in the center of the cloth of a band of lace, 
in shape a square having an irregular edge on one side. The 
cloth was edged with a border of about the same width, having 
the same irregular edge. The lace was made of a fine thread 
and the linen was also of a fine weave, the whole effect being 
very lovely. Almost all the decorated china shown was dis- 
played on specially designed linens, and there is no gain-saying 
the fact that in every instance it gave added charm to the china. 

One came away from the exhibition having a sense of 
"completeness" in regard to this end of the show. A beauti- 
ful room for a child was one of the interesting things shown. 
On the shelves of*a case for books and toys, stood some dishes 
for the use of the wee house-holder that would interest all 
ceramics workers. 

There is so little to be had in the way of shapes for child- 
ren sets which are at all artistic, that it seems high time our 
American potters were making something which we could 
use for this purpose. Imagine what fun could be gotten out 
of designing a set for nursery use with the linens, including 
bibs or aprons. The furniture of the nursery just mentioned 
was very quaint and charming and was painted, which is an- 
other field open to the wide awake worker. But we are get- 
ing away from our linen page! 

A very beautiful cloth was on one occassion evolved from 
some narrow strips of handwoven Russian linen. This at 
first seemed rather useless as it was so narrow. A little study 
suggested a way which proved a very successful solution of 
the problem, and as some reader may have a like problem 
some day, a description may not be amiss. The Russian 
linen was the usual grey tone in which it comes, and was very 
narrow. To combine with this a lovely soft greyish yellow 
linen was used for the center strip. This was cut wide enough 
to give the necessary width to the finished cloth, and the 
strips of grey were used on each side. It was all joined with a 
simple insertion of crochet, a grey linen thread being used. 
The whole cloth had a tiny crocheted edge of the same thread. 
The napkins were made on the same plan, the center of the 
yellow linen, with a narrow grey band on two sides. These 




W fc»% j »W ^. ^i < W » » Mi 




i I 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



165 



also had the crocheted insertion like the cloth, but much nar- 
rower and were also edged the same. The whole set was most 
unusual and created a great deal of interest. A set could 
be made using a plain white linen for the center, with wide 
border of cross-barred linen. This could be joined with a 
crochet made of soft old blue thread, and the whole finished 
with a crocheted edge of some simple pattern. Napkins of 
the same would make a set most attractive for breakfast 
service. Use with this blue china with perhaps a snap of 
orange somewhere about it and surely no morning grouch could 
stand up against it. Ivory white with a border of pink, 
joined with simple bands of crochet, would make the daintiest 
sort of a set. For the napkins, reverse the order of things and 
have the pink in the center, with the ivory white for the bor- 
ders. Any bands for this purpose should be of the simplest 
pattern. If one does this, the labor will not be so great that 
one need hesitate to start a set. Of course one takes on some- 
thing of a task if elaborate designs are selected. Much better 
it is to choose the simpler thing, which in the end, usually 
wins out over the other in its more lasting charm. 
* * * 
Henry F. Farny, the celebrated Indian painter, died in 
Cincinnati, December 23, 1916, bringing to a close one of the 
most remarkable careers in contemporaneous American Art. 
His most famous works are, "Toilers of the Plains," "The 
Last Vigil," "Hiawatha," and "The Coming of the White 
Man." 



CONVENTIONAL PANELS (Page 171) 

F. K. Weisskopf 

UPPER left hand section. Outline and dark tone in basket 
are Black. Light tones in basket and the two grey 
lines around edge of panel and small circles are oiled and dusted 
with 2 parts Dark Blue for Dusting, \ part Banding Blue, 1 
part Ivory Glaze Leaves are oiled and dusted with 1 Grey 
Blue, 1 Florentine Green. Dark tone in roses is 1 Blood Red, 
1 Yellow Red, 1 Ivory Glaze. Light tone is 1 Albert Yellow, 
3 Ivory Glaze. 

Upper right hand panel. All mixtures of colors are same 
as in first panel. Outline and dark background are Black. 
Forget-me-nots and second center in the two large circles are 
Blue. Outer circle is red and the inner circle and the roses 
are Yellow. Daisies are white with red centers. Leaves are 
green. 

Lower left hand panels. Color mixtures same as in first 
panel. The outline, the stamen and dark color at lower corners 
are Black. Flowers are Water Blue. Leaves of the green mixture. 
Body and tips of tail feathers are Red and the wing and re- 
mainder of tail feathers are Yellow. 

Lower right hand panel. Colors same mixture as in first 
panel. Basket outline, the heavy lines and bars around edge 
are Black. The flowers in corners and all of the same drawing 
are Blue. Remainder of flowers are Red and centers of all 
flowers are Yellow. Leaves, Green. 

The design may be executed in enamels or dusting colors. 




LEMONADE PITCHER, WHITE GRAPE DECORATION— DORRIS DAWN MILLS (Treatment page 170) 



166 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




OLIVE AND MINT TRAYS— F. B. HERRINGTON 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ p AGE Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



OLIVE AND MINT TRAYS 

TRACE the design on the china according to directions 
given in the November magazine. Then outline the 
design with 2 parts Copenhagen Blue and 1 part Dark Grey. 
Mix these colors with painting medium. Apply it to the 
china with a No. or No. 1 outlining brush with short hair. 
The outline should be as heavy as it is in the design and should 
be uniform in width. If it is heavier in some places than 
others it can be corrected by sharpening the end of the brush 
handle to a sharp point and the places where the color is too 
wide can be scraped until they are the proper width. Do not 
be satisfied until your outline is perfectly even, for a poor out- 



line will ruin the appearance of the work. When the color 
becomes too thick to work with easily add a drop of either 
lavender oil or turpentine. 

Second Fire — The petals of the flower are to be Banding 
Blue, a little Copenhagen Blue and a little Dark Grey. The 
calyx is Apple Green, a little Yellow Green and a little Copen- 
hagen Blue. Leaves are 3 parts Apple Green, 1 Shading 
Green, 1 Copenhagen Blue and 1 Dark Grey. Prepare the 
paints (which should be powder colors) by mixing with Paint- 
ing medium and if the color seems gritty or lumpy rub it through 
with the palette knife until smooth. Do not use too much oil, it 
seems to be the tendency among students to mix the colors 
too thin, they should be thick enough so that when they are put 
in a heap they will remain where they are put and will not 
flatten out or spread. If a color is too thin one cannot obtain 
a clear crisp color on the china and it will also gather lint after 
it is applied. Use a No. 4 square shader for this work, dip 
the brush in the color and then work the tip of the brush on 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



167 



the palette until the brush is flat and the hair does not separate 
and the color should be evenly distributed in the brush and 
should be the tone that you wish for the china. If the color 
to be is rather light and delicate use very little color in the 
brush and if a heavy color is required take up more color in 
the brush. It is very important to have the color just right 
in the brush before applying it to the china. 

Have a jar of turpentine before you and dip the brush in 
it occasionally and then press it against a rag so that it absorbs 
most of the turpentine, enough Painting medium should also 
be used in the brush to make the color work smoothly though 
care should be taken not to use too much or the work will 
become full of lint. Apply the color as evenly as possible, 
conventional work should be flat and of an even tone. While 
applying the color after you have put in a few strokes go back 
over it with a light touch just dragging the brush over the 
surface, this should be done with the very tip of the brush, 
the tip should not bend at all and the brush should be held 
very lightly in the hand so that it will almost drop from it, 
this gives an opportunity for a very loose light touch and 
blends the color together taking out all brush strokes. 

The edge of the mint tray between the two outer lines 
is 2 parts Copenhagen Blue and 1 part Banding Blue. The 
dark edge around the olive dish is gold. Do not put this over 
the edge of the dish but just up to it as gold wears badly if it 
is in a place where it is handled much. The gold should be 
put on for both fires. If the colors do not come out just as 
they should in this fire they can be gone over with whatever 
it seems to need. 



A SUGGESTION 

Mrs. Bertha C. Cline 

TO become a successful china decorator the qualifications 
of energy and industry are certainly necessary and a per- 
son intending to master this art should prepare for it by study- 
ing works on design, form and color. 

To be an artist one should possess natural talent, love the 
work and have also the determination to succeed. When we 
know that the man that designs the winning sail-boats is blind, 
with eyes and brains we should certainly accomplish wonders 
in our chosen art. 

The treatise on the subject of china decoration that I 
studied was "The teacher of china painting" advertised in 
your beautiful magazine. The book was Greek to me until 
I began taking lessons. No one in my town painted china 
so I went to another town. Between lessons I painted alone 
and thus practiced what I had learned from both teacher and 
book. I began taking lessons in September and sold about 
fifty dollars worth that Christmas. Although I paid it all out 
in express charges, materials, firing, etc., it helped me to learn 
and I did not sell any pieces painted with my teacher. 

The color combination makes the piece beautiful as well 
as the design. I would advise taking more lessons and study- 
ing books and magazines pertaining to this subject and ever- 
lastingly "keeping at it;" this will "keep the fire alive." 
The heights by great men reached and kept, 
Were not attained by sudden flight, 
But they, while their companions slept, 
Were toiling upward in the night. 




MUSH BOWL, INDIVIDUAL SALT CELLAR AND PLATE— ALBERT W. HECKMAN (Treatment page 174) 



168 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

K. S. W. — I have tried firing glass that was -painted with the ordinary over- 
glaze china paint mixed with soft flux, about 1-3 flux and 2-3 color. I heated 
the kiln until a red glow was just beginning to show and the result was, the paint 
came out an indistinguishable color and rubbed off. What -paint shall I usef 

2 . Where can hat pins for painting be purchased? I have not seen them 
offered in any of the china catalogues. 

1. Use colors for glass decoration. 

2. All of the large firms carry the pins, they probably do not list them 
but if you write to them you will easily find them. 

B. J. — What has caused the great falling off in china painting? The art 
stores and the studios show very little of it. Why is it sof It is an art that 
should be as enduring as time itself. 

We do not think china has fallen off. The teachers seem to be as busy as 
ever. All things in the stores go to fads and that is probably the reason the 
stores are not exhibiting as much china but there seems to be about as 
much demand for china as usual. 

B. J. — / have painted on a great variety of materials but I have met my 
Waterloo in dealing with parchment. It wrinkles and crinkles up in spite of 
all efforts. What will prevent this? What varnish is used on parchment and is 
parchment ever varnished before applying water colors? What black is used as a 



We do not know. If any of our subscribers can answer this question, 
we will be glad to publish the answer. If parchment cannot be painted 
easily, the best thing to do is not to paint it at all. 

# if 

THE BOOK SHELF 

Anita Gray Chandler 

The Arts in Early England, by G. Baldwin Brown. (E. 
P. Dutton Co.) Vols. Ill and IV. $7.50 per vol. Descrip- 
tions of Saxon arts and industries in pagan times. 

On the Laws of Japanese Painting, by Henry P. Bowie. 
(Paul Elder and Co.) $2.50. Guide to the study of Japanese 
art with examples of Japanese painting. 

The Russian School of Painting, by Alexandre Benois. 
Introduction by Dr. Christian Brinton. (Alfred A. Knopf.) 
$4.00. Examples of modern Russian Art. 

Handicrafts for the Handicapped, by Herbert J. Hall 
and Mertice M. C. Buck. (Moffat, Yard and Co.), $1.25. 
Instruction in the crafts for those dependent upon their fingers 
for livelihood or amusement. 




BORDER FOR DINNER SET— LILLIAN MILLER 

OIL dark turn over part of leaf, the cap of the bud and the 
veining and dust with Water Llily Green. The lines in 
flowers and the bands are Green Gold. Center of large flower 
is'painted with Albert Yellow. 

Second Fire— Oil grey tone under the leaves and the verti- 
cal bar and dust with 1 part Mode and 2 parts Ivory Glaze. 
Oil leaves and dust with Glaze for Green. Retouch the Gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



169 




DINNER SET— LILLIAN MILLER 



170 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




FRUIT PLATE, BLACK RASPBERRIES— JEANNE M. STEWART 



A FTER applying the black outlines in bands and conven- 
■**- tional motifs paint in the design of raspberries in the 
following colors: Banding Blue, Stewart's Blackberry, Ruby 
Purple, Yellow Green and Lemon Yellow. Ordinary greens 
may be used in the leaves with occasional touches of browns 
and yellows. 

After first fire apply background around berries using 
Ivory Yellow, Lemon Yellow and Stewart's Grey. The 
narrow bands are gold. The broad band Blackberry and the 
darkest spots in conventional motif Blackberry dusted on. 
Center of plate a very light tone of Ivory Yellow. 

In third fire apply gold second time. Touch up outlines 
and any part of the naturalistic design that may need more 
strength. 

The question is often asked how to obtain a matt finish 
to the painting and a subscriber sends the following method. 
"Remove the glaze with a 'China Eraser' first, being careful 
to just remove the glaze and not eat into the china as for 
etching. I have seen this done in bands and the effect is very 
beautiful indeed. In this way the painting has no glaze what- 
ever and is very soft." — E. L. W. 



LEMONADE PITCHER, WHITE GRAPES (Page 165) 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

FOR Grapes use Albert Yellow and Yellow Green on light 
sides with Brown Green and Shading Green for shadow 
with sometimes a touch of Deep Blue Green and Blood Red. 
Leaves Apple Green, Albert Yellow, Brown Green, Shading 
Green, Deep Blue Green and Blood Red. Stems Light Green 
shaded with Brown and Shading Green. Top Dark Green 
dusted on, and bottom Yellow Green. 

PROBLEM FOR DECORATIVE FLOWER COMPOSITION 

(Continued from page 161) 

No. 7. Treatment for finished problem illustrated in 
rectangular Satsuma vase: 

a — Outline design with black and capucine red. Light 
grey leaf of grayish blue enamel. Dark leaf dark blue 
enamel. Flower and spaces inclosing design green 
gold. Centers and stem of flower coral enamel. 

b — Treatment the same for this panel with the ex- 
ception of the flower: the dark spots are coral and re- 
mainder of flower green gold. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



17! 




CONVENTIONAL PANELS— F. R. WEISSKOPF (Treatment page 165) 



172 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MAY E. REYNOLDS ------ p AGE Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 



MARMALADE JAR— RASPBERRIES 

pIRST Fire — Outline the designs and bands without lining 
* ink. Background tint Trenton Ivory. Paint in straw- 
berries with Pompadour and Blood Red, with a touch of 
Crimson Purple in the deep tones, also a little Best Black. 
Shadow berries in Violet of Iron. Leaves in Yellow Green, 
Empire Green, Olive Green and Brown Green. Shadow leaves, 
veins and stems in Violet of Iron, Finishing Brown and a 
touch of Yellow Brown. Lay- in Roman Gold in bands and 
design. 

Second Fire — Retouch strawberries and go over the tint 
with Trenton Ivory if necessary, go over Roman Gold in bands 
and design. 





SERVICE PLATE, GOLDJDESIGN 

ClRST Fire — Asters painted with Peach Blossom and Rose 
very light. Darker asters in Violet Color; use pure, od- 
taining lighter tones with thin wash of Violet color. Design in 
Green Gold. 

Second Fire — Retouch Green Gold where necessary. Pink 
asters retouched with light wash of Peach Blossom, darker 
touches American Beauty, violet asters in Violet Color, and 
touches of Peacock Blue. 

& J> 

SMALL MOTIFS (Page 173) 

W. K. Titze 

NOS. I, II, III, IV— All dark lines and bands either green 
or Roman gold. 

I — Grey bands, Glaze for Green; Grey bands in flower mo- 
tive, Yellow Brown (light); center of flower motive, Yellow Red. 
Naturalistic spray in Yellow, Yellow Brown, Brown Green and 
Violet. 

II — Grey bands, 1 part Violet of Iron and 1 part Rose; 
grey in flower motive, Light Cameo; dark, Blood Red. Natur- 
alistic in tones of pinks, greys or violets. 

Ill — Grey bands, 1 part Ivory Glaze, 1 part Mode; flower 
motive same as No. I. 

IV — Grey bands, Copenhagen Blue; background in back 
of conventional rose, black; rose in white gold. Naturalistic 
spray in tones of white, greys, violets and Copenhagen greys 
and blues. 

V — Basket and dark lines in Silver (liquid); flowers to be 
painted in pinks; grey bands in 1 part Glaze for Blue and 1 part 
Dark Blue for Dusting. 

VI — All dark bands, lines, etc., in Green Bronze (antique); 
grey band in Mode; leaves in conventional motive and berries 
outlined in Roman Gold. Color, leaves 1 part Brown Green, 1 
part Yellow Green; berries, dark, Mode; light, 1 part Cameo, 1 
part Mode and 1 part Ivory Glaze. 

VII — AH lines in gold. Leaves, light, Yellow Green; dark, 
Shading Green; light berries, Banding Blue, dark berries 1 part 
Mode, 1 part Banding Blue and touch of Black. 

VIII — All lines and bands, (dark) in Green Gold. Grey 
bands in 1 part Pearl Grey, 1 part Mode; outlines in conven- 
tional motive are Green Gold ; light leaf in Moss Green, dark 
leaf in Brown Green; light grapes in Banding Blue, dark grapes 
in Mode. 

IX — All lines, spikes and dark bands in Red Bronze Gold ; 
grey bands in Chestnut Brown; cones in Yellow Brown. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



173 



WALTER K. TITZE ----- Page Editor 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

A REQUEST 

I would be glad to receive suggestions in regard to designs, or 
information to be answered on my page in Keramic Studio, 
so that I may make my page as helpful as possible. 




BOWL DESIGN 




BREAKFAST PLATE DESIGN BREAD AND BUTTER PLATE OR BOWL DESIGN 

For Treatment see January number of Keramic Studio 




SMALL MOTIFS— W. K. TITZE 



(Treatment page 172) 



174 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





PLATE BORDER— MAY L. BRIGHAM 

To be carried out in enamels. The two circles in Apples are Oak Brown Enamel. The large light space is Citron Yellow and 

the dots in the center and at the sides are Orange No. 3. Leaves are 2 parts Grass and 1 part White. 

Stems and bands are either Green Gold or White Gold. 




TILE, COWSLIP 

Mrs. Katherine Bertram 

OIL over entire surface of tile, except 
flowers, and dust with 1 Grey Yel- 
low, 3 Ivory Glaze. Second Fire — Oil 
outer band and stems and dust with 
Water Green No. 2. Oil the leaves and 
inner band and dust with Water Lily 
Green. Oil flowers and dust with 3 parts 
Yellow for Dusting and 1 part Pearl 
Grey. Paint stamen of flowers with Yel- 
low Red. The outline is omitted in this 
design. The light part of large leaf is 
oiled and dusted with Florentine Green. 

««* *• 

MUSH BOWL, SALT CELLAR AND 
PLATE (Page 167) 

Albert W. Heckman 

FIRST Fire— Paint in all the black parts 
of design with Green Gold and dust 
all the grey bands with Glaze for Blue. 

Second Fire — Paint in the roses and 
bulbs with a flat wash of Peach Blossom 
and touch up with gold where it is needed. 



K. E. CHERRY 

CHINA COLORS AM) ENAMELS 

SEND FOR REVISED PRICE LIST OF ALL COLORS 
In vials and half vials 



Special price 10 cents a half vial net for 12 enamels 
which have been eliminated from our present list. 
This offer is good until the stock on hand of these 
special vials is exhausted. See December advertisement 



The Robineau Pottery* 



Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS! 

Send for special list of 17 very fine imported glass colors; 
put up only in half vials : 
Mixing Yellow 9c. Gold Yellow 19c. Transparent Orange 16c. 

Yellow Brown 13c. Hair Brown 14c. Best Red 14c. 

Deep Carmine 20c. Rose Pink 17c. Violet Purple 40c. 

Deep Ruby. 56c. Light Green 15c. Celestial Blue 13c. 

Peacock Blue 13c. Dark Green 15c. Transparent Black. 13c. 
Outlining Black 10c. Soft Flux 13c. 

As an introductory offer, we will send these 17 colors, one 
half vial each, for $2.25 net (list price $3.10). 

ROMAN GOLD FOR GLASS $1.00 per box 

SILVER FOR GLASS 50c. per box 

The Robineau Pottery, Syracuse, N. Y. 



A SMALL LINE OF 

New SATSUMA WARE Just Arrived ! 

More Coming Later ! 

Only a limited supply 
of the shapes shown 
on hand. As formerly 
advertised, 

SATSUMA 
has advanced 20%. 
Buy now for future use ! 

Add parcel post charges 
to your zone. 

No China Catalogue 
Issued. 

Refer to back numbers of 

"Keramic Studio" 
for shapes and prices of 
No. 121, Rose Jar 9Sc No. 77 3M in. UJk 8Sc "FAVORITE" China. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING LNK, 
25c and 50c Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 dozen. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 
COOVER'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLLES. 

K.. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 
JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




REMITTANCES!!! 



We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft but if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is JO cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



TI1C POTTER 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO 
THORE INTERESTED IN CERAMICS. 



Edited by FREDERICK HURTEN RHEAD. 

Contributing Editor, EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, A.M., PhD. 
Director Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia. 

Published by THE POTTER PUBLISHING CO., 

Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, California 

SUBSCRIPTION $3.00 a year, 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone, but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 
S^-POSTPAID TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co .25 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 Tols. (or rols. sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana. 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) ... .75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool _ 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 5.00 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 3.00 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, Class Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



EASTER GIFTS 



FOR 



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> 









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EACH COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME: POSTPAID 

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No. 1. 3.00 

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Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, 

. Class Room No. 4 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

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Cloth 2.50 

SPECIAL COMBINATION PRICES 

One Book and Subscription to Keramic Studio 6.50 

Two Books and Subscription to Keramic Studio 9.00 

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Two Books ordered together 5.50 

Three Books ordered together 8.00 

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Seven Books ordered together.... 17.50 

Above offer refers to books listed at $3.00 to $5.00 
Nine Books Complete and 1 years' subscription 

to Keramic Studio 21.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers and year's subscription 

to Keramic Studio 5.00 

Little Things to Make and year's subscription to 

Keramic Studio 5.75 
12 Nos. Palette & Bench Oct. '08 to Sept. '09 

and a year's subscription to Keramic Studio . . 5.50 



A NEW BOOK 

Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

Paper Cover $1.50 post paid. Cloth Cover $2.50 post paid. 

«~ Send card for information and prospectus. 

Liberal discount to Dealers 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. Syracuse N. Y. 



w^ 



K-E^E^T=> HTM 



F"l R-E- A^UIV^EL- 



CONTRIBUTORS 



JESSIE M. BARD 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

JETTAEHLERS 

MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 

MAUD M. MASON 

VANDA U. NEWITT 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

MAY E. REYNOLDS 

ADELAIDE ALSOP-ROBINEAU 

JEANNE M. STEWART 

ELISE W. TALLY 

WALTER K. TITZE 

MRS, VERN1E LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



> v 



^Jonian \nstif l 



^ 



MAR 1-1917 



■'onai NU*^ 



&\ 



MAR. MCMXVII Price 40c. Yearly Subscription $4.00 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF MARCH, 1917 







Pag« 


Editorial 




175 


At the Sign of the Brush and Palette 


Anita Gray Chandler 


176 


Adaptation of the Color Supplement 


Mrs. Adelaide Alsop-Robineau 


177 


Group by Kathryn E. Cherry 




177 


Mrs. Kathryn E. Cherry 


Mrs. Adelaide Alsop-Robineau 


178 


Vase in Gold and Lustres 


Mrs. Kathryn E. Cherry 


179 


Work of Mrs. Cherry's Minneapolis Class 




180-181 


Polychrome Rhodian Plates in the Cluny Museum 




182 


Plate, Bird Motif 


Maud M. Mason 


182-183 


French China Plate 


Dorothea "Warren O'Hara 


184 


Jardiniere 


Elise W. Tally 


185 


Adaptations of the Nasturtium Bud 


Henrietta Barclay Paist 


187 


Vases, Birds (Supplement) 


May E. Reynolds 


187-189 


The Linen Page 


Jetta Ehlers 


190-191 


Tea Set 


Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 


192 


Baskets 


"Walter K. Titze 


193 


Beginners' Corner 


Jessie M. Bard 


194 


Answers to Correspondents 




194, 195, 196 


Tray, Young Robin and Cherry Blossoms 


Jeanne M. Stewart 


195 


Borders for Etched China or Glass 


Vanda U. Newitt 


196 


Borders 


Mrs. F. H. Hanneman 


194-196 



<6" 



% 



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The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE KILN 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




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The only fuels which give perfect results in 

Glaze and Color Tone mUlsP^ ®8S^Ss<*** 

No. 2 SizegH'x 12 to $30.00 ) / No. 1 Size 10 x'12 to $15.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 19 to. 40.00 GaS ** 2 *" Ch^l Kiln 4 sizes ! ^ \ J~ J« « g ^ *>.00 

No. 3 Size 16 x 15 to 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No . 4 size is x 26 to. 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., Springfield, Ohio 



9> 








Vol. xvm, No. n. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



March 1917 




LESSED are the wounds of a friend." 
Mr. Frederick Hurten Rhead of the 
magazine, "The Potter," is a friend of 
some years standing, and a faithful 
friend, though at times a trifle for- 
getful, as so many ceramists are liable 
to be, whether potter or decorator. 
He says, and no doubt there is truth 
at the bottom of the well, that Ke- 
ramic Studio has not changed, on the 
whole, with the novel trends of the times as they pass. He 
asks where are our evidences of the movements going on in our 
artistic midst — the cubist, the futurist, and all the other "ists" 
— and demands why we do not keep the standard of Keramic 
Studio in every respect up to the ideals we have so frequently 
expressed. He did not use just these words, but these are the 
conclusions we have drawn. He, together with some others 
of our good friends who are real friends and wish to help, thinks 
Keramic Studio would double its circulation if it would only 
drop entirely all that does not come out as refined gold in the 
fire of criticism and fill its pages with "high brow" stuff only. 
He forgets that Keramic Studio's editor and publishers have 
been through the fiery furnace, and while they have come out 
with whole skins like Shadrach, Mesech and Abednego, they 
have left behind all illusions as to the possibility of getting a 
sufficiently large "high brow" audience to support a maga- 
zine devoted to the best, and to the best only. For sixteen 
months we published Palette and Bench, the like of which for 
both quantity and quality in the way of artistic instruction 
had never before been given to the world, "if we do say so as 
shouldn't." And then it died the death. 

Now we go carefully with Keramic Studio, trying to fill the 
needs of all types of mental and artistic development, so that 
Keramic Studio shall live till those who begin with painting 
real cabbages and bugs and birds shall have passed through all 
the successive steps to an appreciation of true and beautiful 
decoration. And, by the same token, we let the new move- 
ments filter through in the influence shown in the work of our 
leading decorators, so that when it finally reaches our public 
it is sufficiently diluted and pre-digested to be accepted without 
too great a shock to the uninitiated. 

This all sounds somewhat flippant, but there is this truth 
in it, that if we should devote pages of Keramic Studio to expo- 
sition of the new work, the new movements in art, it would be 
as if we had printed pages of the original Hebrew or Greek 
characters and only the initiated few would be able to make 
anything out of it. We strive continually to be always lifting 
our students a little higher, step by step, gently, so they will 
not be frightened and give up, and I think if our good friends 
and critics could have the time to go through an old file of 
Keramic Studio and follow step by step the changes that have 
come about in design and decoration, they would frankly ac- 
knowledge that while always somewhat in the rear of the pro- 
cession as regards the eccentric efforts to find something new 
under the sun, whether good, bad, or indifferent, we have shown 
a steady movement upward, and a comparison of the early 
issues and these later ones will show that we have been able to 
carry our public with us to a much higher plane, on which 
traces of the new movements will not be altogether absent. 



So much in justification of our position. At the same time, 
we admit that it would be joy undiluted to be able to fill Ker- 
amic Studio with the best only and dare the world to do its 
worst. It is toward that goal we daily press. May the day 
soon dawn when we can count on you all to hold up our hands 
in so doing. 

K « 

N. Y. S. K. A. 

At the meeting of the N. Y. S. K. A. held on January 10, 
1917, it was voted to hold an exhibition of members' work at 
the Little Gallery, 15 East 40th Street, New York City, from 
March 19th to 31st. 

Our society is the only one in this country composed only 
of professional workers in both pottery and porcelain and the 
aim is to keep the exhibitions on the highest plane of excel- 
lence and to show only work having real artistic merit. 

The Little Gallery is identified with the foremost achieve- 
ment of all handicrafts and exhibits none but the work of 
Master Craftsmen. 

It is generally agreed that there is no finer or more fitting 
setting in New York for an exhibition of pottery and porcelain 
than these Galleries afford. 

On account of the expense connected with the exhibition 
it is possible to include only active members, but any profes- 
sional worker whose works pass the Jury is eligible for mem- 
bership. There will be another meeting of the Society before 
the Annual Exhibition, at which time such candidates may be 
elected with the privilege of the forthcoming exhibition. 

The dues for membership are $2.00 per annum. Such 
applications should be sent at once to the Secretary Pro-Tern, 
Miss Harriette Horsfall, 18 Belmont Terrace, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Application blanks will follow, also exhibition cards and 
envelopes. 

Works must be delivered unpacked at the Little Gallery 
on March 16. Parker's Express, 158 W. 56th Street is recom- 
mended to out-of-town members as being a reliable place to 
which work may be shipped and unpacked and by whom it 
will be delivered to the Little Gallery. 

Elizabeth Mason Vanderhoof, Chairman. 
Harriette Horsfall, Sec. Pro-Tern. 
» » 
ARTS AND CRAFTS 

TWO new books of interest are "The New Interior," by 
Hazel H. Adler, the Century Co. publishers, and "The 
Practical Book of Early American Arts and Crafts," by Harold 
Donaldson Eberlein and Abbot McClure, Lippincott, pub- 
lisher. 

"The New Interior" is well illustrated both in color and 
black and white, is entertainingly written and full of sugges- 
tions for the crafts worker and decorator While the reference 
to American crafts workers is confined as a rule to a somewhat 
narrow circle of eastern representatives, the plea for substantial 
recognition of contemporary craftswork as a whole is strong 
and convincing. Ceramics are represented by Henry Mercer, 
potter (faience tiles), Mary Chase Perry, potter (faience tiles 
and vases), the Durant Kilns, Leon Wolkman, potter, Mrs 
Rice, designer (decorative faience, tableware, etc.), and Mrs. 

(Continued on page 183) 



176 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

7 Edison Avenue. Tufts College, Mass. 



Page Editor 



.xgfcx^ 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 

This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



r I ^HE illustration this month is Sargent's Madonna of Sor- 
A rows, one of the noblest of his new paintings at the 
Boston Public library. As one ascends the stairs which lead 
to the long narrow hall which his murals adorn, this queenly 
figure at once majestic and sorrowful, commands the attention. 
She stands behind a screen of lighted candles, robed in rich 
fabric and upheld by the crescent moon. Into her heart are 
thrust the seven swords of the Seven Sorrows. In spite of 
the sumptuousness of the gold candle-sticks, which are done 
in half -relief, and the splendor of the robe and crown the whole 
effect is one of sadness. All tones are muted as it were. No 
reproduction can be expected to give the beautiful details of 
the original. 




vian and Russian Art; March 23, American Painters; April 
20, American Sculptors; May 4, Draughtsmen and Etchers. 
The lecturer is Mr. Robert B. Harshe, assistant director of 
the Department of Fine Arts. 

"If the useful arts suffered at the expense of fine arts 
during the nineteenth century, the pendulum of the twentieth 
is swinging in the opposite direction," says Hazel H. Adler 
in the January International Studio, in an article on The 
Decorative Arts in America. "Here in America," she con- 
tinues, "hundreds of men and women are being recruited from 
the ranks of painters and sculptors to the ranks of those who 
are trying to bring into the everyday life of the people that 
beauty which has hitherto been reserved for the art gallery 
and Museum. . . . Outwardly the American movement 
is marked by a free, delightful and spontaneous use of color. 
Inwardly it shows the tendency to apply intelligently modern 
artistic principles, creating objects expressive of modern 
taste and character, and in keeping with modern ideas of 
beauty. It shows tendencies toward exploration and dis- 
covery, toward a generous use of the imagination, and toward 
a technical skill and perfection which is' bidding fair to rival 
that of some of the best pieces of the past." Special mention 
is made of the honors paid Mrs. Adelaide Alsop-Robineau and 
Dorothea Warren O'Hara. 

A fascinating new book just published is Arts and Crafts, 
a review of the work executed by students in the leading art 
schools of Great Britain and Ireland. Edited by Charles 
Holme. In his preface he states that "In view of the interest 
which is now being shown in decorative and applied art, and 
its bearing upon the struggle for supremacy which must inevi- 
tably follow the end of the war, it is of the utmost importance 
that our workers should be adequately trained and equipped." 
The work of fifteen London art schools and sixteen provincial 
schools is given. The illustrations show very charming exam- 
ples of painted underglaze porcelain (with undeniable Chinese 
and Persian influence), embroideries, laces, designs for cretonne, 
silk, and tapestry hangings, rugs, leather and embroidered 
book-covers, book-plates, stained glass, carved and painted 
wood panels, dress designs, inlaid furniture, jewelry, silverware, 
tiles, pottery, repousse copper work, table linen, and designs 
for rooms. We are glad to see what our English cousins are 
doing and how they are doing it. 

The 112th annual exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy 
of Fine Arts was opened Feb. 4, continuing seven weeks. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

The 18th annual exhibition of the American Society of 
Miniature Painters will be held under the auspices of the Na- 
tional Academy of Design at the American Fine Arts Galleries, 
215 West Fifty-seventh street, New York, from March 17 to 
April 22. The miniatures exhibited [have never !before been 
publicly shown. 

The Toledo Art Museum recently paid $30,000 for a col- 
lection of dolls dressed by Doucet, the French designer. The 
dolls, seventy-five in number, were modeled by French artists 
from portraits of the characters represented, depicting French 
history from the opening of the twelfth century to the present 
time. The collection was purchased at the Allied Bazaar 
held in Boston last December. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



The following lectures will be given at the Carnegie In- 
stitute on Friday evenings at 8.15 p. m.: March 9, Scandina- 




i@L— J^. 




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2 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



177 




ADAPTATION OF THE COLOR SUPPLEMENT— MRS. ADELAIDE ALSOP ROBINEAU 



SALT Shaker — Enamels, top band, blue ; bottom band, green. 
Bird, head, back and tail, and wings, blue; throat, orange; 
breast, yellow; eye, beak and claws, black; twig, green. 

Cup and Saucer — Branches silver, blossoms gold, red and 



orange; enamel dots in centers. Birds — Outlines, gold; eyes, 
beaks and claws, red enamel; orange enamel on heads, wings 
and tails. 

(Continued on page 193) 



178 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

MRS. CHERRY'S charming personality is as well known 
as her charming work, in spite of the fact that she will 
do almost nothing to advertise herself and her work. Being 
a personal friend of the editor, the latter speaks with feeling 
on this subject, having endeavored in vain to get any details 
of her career for the benefit of Keramic Studio readers. It is 
Mrs. Cherry's one serious fault that she is so wrapped up in 
her work that it is almost impossible to get her to "tend to 
business." 

It was at about the time of the birth of Keramic Studio 
that Mrs. Cherry came to Mrs. Robineau's studio in New York 
for a few lessons in what was then the only conventional work, 
raised paste-enamel and lustre. Since then she has so far out- 
stripped her teacher, both in design and execution of overglaze 
decoration, that if the latter returned to- this field, which she 
deserted fifteen years ago, she would need to take lessons of her 
pupil. All that the editor can resurrect out of memories of the 
past in regard to Mrs. Cherry's honors is the gold medal re- 
ceived at the St. Louis Exposition. She is a Master Craftsman 
of the Boston Society of Arts and Crafts, and in the last exhibit 
of the Art Institute of Chicago, received honorable mention 
from the jury on the Mrs. J. Ogden Armour Prize. 

She is an indefatigable worker. I have known her to get 
up at daybreak and go out into the fields and paint a couple of 
canvases before breakfast, teach her classes from eight till five 
p. m., paint another canvas before dinner, and another after 
dinner, and then work till after ten p. m. straightening out the 
day's class work. She has made a considerable reputation for 
her work in oils among her fellow artists of the St. Louis Artists' 




GROUP BY KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



179 



Guild, as well as an almost national reputation among the 
workers in ceramics. She has studied with all the leading 
American decorators of fifteen years ago and was one of the 
first to attend Marshal Fry's classes at Shinnecock. There 
are perhaps a half dozen names that could be mentioned as 
leading in ceramic work to-day, and her name would be found 
among the first three. 



KATHRYN E. CHERRY - 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Editor 





VASE IN GOLDS AND LUSTRES 

THIS may be done in Light Green or Yellow Lustre. Lus- 
tre the vase and fire, then trace design in; the large circle 
is Green Gold Bronze, the three leaves around flower are Roman 
Gold, the small flower is Yellow Brown Lustre put on heavy, 
the leaves at the side between divisions are Green Gold, the up- 
right lines are Green Gold Bronze. After being fired, go over 
gold again and touch a little scarlet enamel in center of flower. 



SHOP NOTE 

Mrs. Alice Brown of Minneapolis has been teaching in the 
Milwaukee Art Store during the greatest part of January, and 
her work has been so successful that she will remain in the store 
all February. Her work was mainly in enamels. Miss Spon- 
holz of Milwaukee, who has mastered the enamel work in splen- 
did style, has been sent by the Milwaukee Art Store to the E. 
Westphal Art Co., in the Bracks Shops, Los Angeles, Cal. 
This is a good opportunity for decorators in Los Angeles to 
perfect themselves in enamel work. 




180 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Mrs. A. B. Larson 



Miss Perry 



Miss M. Holmes 




Mary Page Mrs. Keese Mrs. Hutchins 

WORK OF MRS. CHERRY'S MINNEAPOLIS CLASS 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



W 




Miss Atta Dickens 




Mrs. Alice Brown 

WORK OF MRS. CHERRY'S MINNEAPOLIS CLASS 



ART ALLIANCE OF AMERICA 

A COMPETITION for hand decorated and hand woven 
fabrics has been opened by the Art Alliance of America, 
45 E. 42d St., New York. 

Fabrics must not be sent in before April 8th and not later 
than April 15th, the closing date. The actual fabric is to be 
submitted. It is to be decorated by hand, in any of the fol- 
lowing treatments: Embroidery, Painting, Batik, Tie-dyeing, 
Beadwork, Block printing, Hand weaving, or any other hand 
technique for the decoration of fabric. 

Any number of fabrics may be submitted but no contes- 
tant can take more than one prize. 

The prizes are $100, $75, $50, $25, offered by Albert Blum, 
treasurer of the United Piece Dye Works. 

The judges will be: Prof. Arthur W. Dow, Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia; Mr. E. Irving Hanson, one of the most prom- 



inent silk men in the industry; Mr. Edward L. Mayer, an 
exclusive costumer; Mr. M. D. C. Crawford, Research As- 
sociate in Textiles, American Museum of Natural History. 

While beauty of execution will be considered, the important 
thing is the originality and beauty of the design. 

Card should be attached to each piece entered, giving 
name and address of the maker, source of inspiration of design, 
and purpose for which the fabric is intended. 

JARDINIERE (Page 185) 

Elise W. Tally 

DUST the base of the jardiniere also the bands with Dark 
Blue for Dusting, also the leaves. Flowers in Deep 
Ivory with centers of Coffee Brown with stems of a pale Bright 
Green. Dust the buds with Cameo. 



182 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




POLYCHROME RHODIAN PLATES IN THE CLUNY MUSEUM, PARIS 



MAUD M. MASON Page EmT0R 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



FOR OUR INSPIRATION 
T FIND that the selection of some one example of the most 
-■- beautiful in ceramics is not so easy a matter as I thought, 
owing to the wealth of material available. I feel that I can 
only shuffle some dozen photographs and select the one that 
happens to come out on top! 

This month it proves to be two beautiful old Polychrome 
Rhodian Plates that are in the Cluny Museum in Paris. The 
left one with the floral motif pleases me particularly for its 
charm of line arrangement which swings so delightfully into 
the form of the plate and with the masses of leaves and flowers 
making a fine well balanced design. The large dominating 
central leaf form is especially charming in its treatment and 
breaks the other lines in a most satisfactory manner. The 
decoration is in full rich color — reds, blues and greens. 

The motif of the other design may be one of the many 
classic ships of ancient story, sailing in a stiff breeze on a rol- 
ling sea. It is full of life and movement, expressive of gayety 
and joyousness. The border decoration frames this design 
admirably, being well spaced and interesting in the contrast 
of large and small masses of light, and harmonious in its move- 
ment of line with the center decoration. The color scheme of 
this plate is in blues, greens and with greenish black outlines. 
These photographs are not given with the expectation 
that they will be copied (although that might be done with 
profit), but to help acquaint our friends in remote towns with 
some of the treasures in ceramics that are in the Museums. 
» w 
PLATE, BIRD MOTIF 
T^HIS plate is decorated with the Mason soft enamels. 
-*- The design was planned for a Belleek or other soft glazed 
plate. When this design is repeated in a set it gives a very 
gay and pleasing effect. The circular motif is a convenient 
one to repeat effectively on bowls, biscuit jars, and other pieces 
that may make up the set, if properly related with suitable 
bands, etc. For the soft glazed plate the following enamels 
were used: greens, Willow Green; black, Black Enamel; 



yellow, Citron Yellow, or equal parts Soft and Imperial Yellow; 
violet, Red Violet; reds, Vermillion. 

The decoration will probably need retouching unless con- 
siderable experience has been had in laying enamels, and they 
may be gone over on soft glazes as often as necessary to attain 
the desired result. The effect of any enamel is much more 
artistic, however, if kept very low in relief. An obviously 
thick raised effect tends to vulgarize them, while no medium 
is so satisfying and charming as enamels when used with dis- 
cretion. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



183 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 

(Continued from page 175) 

Adelaide Alsop-Robineau, potter (high fire porcelains). Over- 
glaze decoration is illustrated by the work of Mrs. Dorothea 
Warren O'Hara and the Ceramic Society of Greater New York, 
under the able leadership of Marshal Fry, Jr. It is a work 
well worth including in any library of contemporary crafts- 
work. 

"The Practical Book of Early American Arts and Crafts" 
is another book that should be owned by all interested in crafts- 
work. It^covers practically all the ground from the time of the 



early settlers to the beginning of the nineteenth century. It 
is particularly strong on metal work and needle work, but 
ceramics are interestingly illustrated by the Pennsylvania 
Dutch Tulip ware, early American glass, and an expecially in- 
teresting chapter on early Mexican pottery under Spanish and 
Chinese influence, all well illustrated, and well worth study by 
our decorators and designers looking for characteristic motifs, 
other than Indian. We think that interest would have been 
added to the book by an intelligently selected chapter on abor- 
iginal pottery. But the book is already quite bulky, confined 
to the work of white settlers. ._ We heartily recommend the 
book for reference purposes. 




PLATE, BIRD MOTIF— MAUD M, MASON 



184 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




Full size section of plate 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA - - Page Editor 

132 East 19th Street, New York City 

FRENCH CHINA PLATE 

THE flowers are outlined with Dark Brown color. Gil- 
lott's No. 170 pen is the best pen I know of for this 
kind of outlining. The Dark Brown color should be mixed 
with Painting Medium and thinned with Outlining Medium. 
The little bead design which forms the medallions is made 
of Roman Gold. 

First fire— Do the Gold work and outline all of the design. 
Second fire — Float in enamels, using new hard enamels. Mix 
enamels with Enamel Medium, thin with pure fresh turpen- 
tine and float on thinly. 

The large flower with four petals, and the small round 
flower at the extreme left, are made of Pomegranate Red En- 
amel No. H-317. The leaves and stems are made of Olive Green 
Enamel No. H-332. The center of large four petal flower, the 
lower part of flower just above the large four petal flower, the 
small bell shaped flower at left and the inside part of the bell 
shaped flower just above it are made of Wisteria No. H-312. 



The dot in center of the four petal flower, the round flower at 
extreme left, the upper part of flower just above the large four 
petal flower, the lower part of the bell shaped flower next to it, 
and the center part of the bell shaped flower just below it and 
to the left of the large four petal flower, are made of Yellow No. 
2 Enamel No. H-304. The bunches of flowers next to the rim 
of plate are made of Olive Green Enamel No. H-332 for leaves. 
Yellow No. 2 Enamel H-304 for flower at right and Pomegranate 
Red Enamel No. H-317 for flower at left. For the little bunch 
on inside use Olive Green Enamel No. H-332 for leaves, Pome- 
granate Red Enamel No. H-317 at right and Wisteria Enamel 
No. H-312 for the flower at left. 

This description may seem confused, but with the design 
at hand, if carried out, will produce desired results. 

Note — The Warren O'Hara Color Co.'s enamels and me- 
diums are used in the treatment of this design. 

NOTES 

THE Keramic Society of Greater New York will open its 
annual exhibition at the Museum of Natural History, 
72d St. and Central Park West, May 8th to 22nd. The exhi- 
bition committee have planned the main exhibition room as a 
garden. Many of the tables are being designed and decorated 
individually by members of the society. Open slat screens of 
a very interesting pattern, which will be placed between the 
different exhibits, are being made in the carpenter shop of the 
Museum. 

Such articles as vases, bowls, etc., inappropriate for a gar- 
den, will be shown in the adjoining gallery. One of the many 
interesting features of the exhibition will be a large number of 
bowls, the designs of which have been worked out from a very 
wonderful Peruvian collection acquired by the Museum. 
There may be some disappointment on the part of out-of-town 
teachers that this exhibition will not be held during the Easter 
holidays, so they could take advantage of the low railroad rates 





KERAMIC STUDIO 



185 



offered at that season, but the Society's design classes are not 
closed until May 1st. It is believed that all will be amply re- 
paid who attend. All communications pertaining to the exhi- 
bition should be addressed to Chairman of Exhibition Commit- 
tee, Mrs. Elizabeth Roth, 436 Fort Washington Ave., New 
York City. 

•:♦ ♦ ♦ 
Photographs of the ceramics shown at the National So- 
ciety of Craftsmen's Exhibition, held at National Arts Club 
during December, were not sent to the Keramic Studio for pub- 
lication, because much of the work shown there will be found 
at the Keramic Society of Greater New York Exhibition. 

The National Society of Craftsmen has reorganized. The 
Governing Board and a small group of Art patrons interested 
in the craft movement have decided that the energy and funds 
which have in the past been required for the maintenance of 
the sales room, should be used in organizing and developing 
two important exhibitions during the year, to which members 
are requested to send their best and most representative work. 
It is the consensus of opinion that the sales made during these 
two exhibitions will far exceed the sum total of the sales made 
in the rooms of the Society during the entire twelve months of 
previous years. The Governing Board believes that the Soci- 
ety can best serve its members by making its'present headquar- 



ters in the National Arts Club Studios, 119 East 19th St., not 
only a clearing house through which orders for craft work may 
be placed, but in addition thereto, having it the center of many 
and varied activities, including special individual exhibits by 
members and master craftsmen, educational and social work, 
classes in the crafts, lectures, discussions and receptions to emi- 
nent craft workers from other Art centers in this country and 
abroad. A bureau of information will be one of the features, 
giving a list of reliable shops in this and other cities, where 
members may place their work on sale to best advantage, giv- 
ing full details as to commission, conditions, etc. It is the 
belief of our Governing Board that the Society is entering upon 
a new era of broadening influence and prosperity and the ear- 
nest co-operation of each member seems already assured. 

The National Society of Craftsmen is holding during Feb- 
ruary and March a large and extremely interesting exhibition 
in the Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco, Calif. The officers 
of this institution have promised to purchase some of the craft 
work shown, with a view of making a permanent collection of 
the best modern work in this grand building. It has been con- 
clusively proven to the officers of the National Society of Crafts- 
men that the organization of such exhibits as has just been men- 
tioned are truly national in their scope and of vital importance 
to the craft workers. 




JARDINIERE— ELISE W. TALLY 



(Treatment page 181) 



186 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST - Page Editor 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

"O EFINEMENT can nowhere better be shown than in the 
-IV restraint exercised in the matter of table decorations. 
Here is where we should put on the brakes. Personally I am 
not in sympathy with elaborate decoration, either as to the 
china used, or the accessories. I do not care for the illusion of 
a Japanese or Italian garden, or anything foreign to the busi- 
ness in hand. There is an eternal fitness of things which 
should be considered before a love of display. A dish of real 
fruit as a centerpiece is much more sincere and tempting and 
conducive to a healthy appetite than the most artistic repre- 
sentation in glass. Flowers and candles are logical and always 
beautiful for special occasions — but let us consider the normal 
average meal rather than the special occasion. We will not 
eliminate the centerpiece of flowers or fruit but we will reduce 



the "trimmings" to a minimum and the "service" to a basis of 
utility. 

Let us remind ourselves again that the most logical place 
for decoration is near the edge of dishes and where impossible 
— on the outside. On account of the difficulty of obtaining 
perfect and permanent results with enamels on hard glazes, 
I think it would be better if we were willing to be satisfied 
with flat color and gold for the average table service. It 
isn't necessary to do everything in relief just because it is 
popular and interesting, and — difficult. We do not always 
have to be striving for the extreme, the novel, or the elaborate. 
Especially do we find this spirit at exhibitions. • One tries 
to outdo the others in the elaborate use of enamels — or other 
materials. It is not necessary to tell all we know on one or 
two pieces. Art is more than technique — or mastery over 
materials. We would do better to consider more the "fitness 
to purpose" and express some simple thought consistently 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



187 



than to strive to outdo our contemporaries in the manipulation 
of diffcult mediums. This striving |brings us every once in 
awhile to the verge of Artistic Ennui — and we subside until 
someone starts a new theme and we rush in to see how many 
variations we can introduce. It's all very interesting while 
it is spontaneous but it is not all of art — and nowhere more 
than in the decoration of table service does sincerity and sim- 
plicity prove its value. 

This month I have shown a few variations in the adapta- 
tion of the nasturtium bud to simple shapes. This may be 
treated in the natural colors or in monochrome, flat, or in 
relief, flat gold or with the background removed by the use 
of acid. They can be outlined or left without. An outline 
by the way covers a multitude of artistic sins — it restores 
uneven edges and covers up in a measure our ignorance of 
color values. It holds together a design which would other- 
wise have no continuity. But we should not depend on this 
or use it for the reasons given. We should study to be able to 
do without outlines and not consider them a necessity. This 
means more than perfect technique — an understanding of 
color values is absolutely necessary to be able to procure unity 
in a design — to avoid a spotty effect — to obtain a balance of 
the parts, and a finish and a completeness which no amount 
of outlining can give if it lacks color balance. 

♦ ♦>"! ♦ 

The Twin City Keramic Club held its January luncheon 
on Wednesday, January 10th, at the Emporium in St. Paul. 
Mr. Tyler McWhorter artist, art critic and Business Director 
of the St. Paul Art Institute, addressed the club, the subject 
being "Keramic Art, Its Relation to Life." Mr. McWhorter 
put great emphasis on the nature of Keramic Art, its perman- 
ence and therefore its value as historical evidence of the period 
in which it was produced — and tried to awaken the Artists 
present to a realization of their responsibilities on account of 
the permanent nature of the work they are doing. This is a 
thought Keramic Artists would do well to ponder on. We, 
more than any other people are working for posterity, for 
historical evidence of the life of the people of to-day, and our 
products will persist after everything else has crumbled to dust. 

Miss Florence Huntington of the Minneapolis Institute 
of Arts has just returned from a three weeks trip to Cali- 
fornia and has resumed her duties as head of the Department 
of Keramic and Assistant in General Design. 

"Picture Fireplaces" is the title of an illustrated article 
in December "Craftsman". All sorts of fairy, love and legend 
are depicted in relief and worked out in color. One set for a 
child's room shows Bible stories; another for a nursery illus- 
trates Blue Beard. Rip Van Winkle is the subject of a grate 
hall fireplace; Pickwick characters for a Library, etc., two 
sets are called the New World Fireplaces. These are' more 
formal in handling and symbolical in design. There is great 
charm in decorated tile, whether for fireplaces, as insert in 
buildings or garden walls, as coping around flower beds, in 
fountains, in pavements or floors. The tendency of architects 
to introduce colored tile as interior or exterior decoration is 
only another evidence of the awakening of the New World 
to the value and possibility in color and is indicative of a 
freer, more joyous intrepretation of Art. We must not for- 
get that the department of Keramics includes more than the 
overglaze decoration of ornament and table service and should 
be alive to all tendencies which aim to make life more inter- 
esting and joyous and Art more universal. 



MAY E. REYNOLDS - Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, 111. 




VASE (Supplement) 

(Illustration three-quarters of height) 

ClRST Fire— Birds in Moss Green, Lemon Yellow, Peach 
*• Blossom and Best Black; blossoms in Peach Blossom and 
touches of Violet of Iron and Paris Brown; branches Best 
Black and Violet. Bands, Grey. 

Second Fire — Bands oiled with Special Tinting Oil, and 
powdered with three parts French Grey, one-third part Ameri- 



188 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



can Beauty, and one part Pink Glaze, and one-half part Best 
Black for darker band. Strengthen branches. 

Third Fire — Paint over entire vase with Copenagen 



Grey three parts, and one part Grey Glaze, retouch birds in 
Brown Green, Violet Color and Albert Yellow, American 
Beauty and Violet of Iron in blossoms. 




VASE, ROSE BREASTED GROSBEAKS (Supplement) 

(Illustration about two-thirds of height) 



FIRST Fire— Birds in Albert Yellow, Violet, Finishing 
Brown, and Best Black; leaves in Olive Green and 
Violet, blossoms in Violet of Iron light. 

Second Fire— Oil with Special Tinting Oil and powder 
with Grey for White Roses two parts, Grey Glaze one part, 



Finishing Brown one part, clean out^bird and flowers leaving 
the foliage and branches under the tint. 

Third Fire — Wash over tint with very thin wash Yellow 
Brown, retouch birds with Brown b Green, Finishing Brown, 
Best Black, and touch of Violet. Retouch foliage if necessary. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



189 




VASE, BLUEBIRDS (Supplement) 

(Illustration about two-thirds of height) 



FIRST Fire — Birds painted in Peacock Blue, Baby Blue, 
darker parts Royal Blue; breast Trenton Ivory; blos- 
soms in Albert Yellow, French Grey and Violet; foliage Hair 
Brown, Finishing Brown and Violet; branches Best Black and 
Violet. 

Second Fire- — Oil entire surface of vase with Special Tint- 
ing Oil, thin wash, clean out yellow flowers and birds, and 



powder at once with one part Pink Glaze, three parts Copen- 
hagen Grey, one-half part Finishing Brown. 

Third Fire — Birds painted in Royal Blue and dark touches 
Black, wash of Peacock Blue and Violet on head of bird, 
flowers retouched in Albert Yellow, and wash of Yellow Brown, 
paint Best Black over entire lower part of vase, powder 
with Best Black at base. 



190 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTA EHLERS --"--.. Page Editor 
18 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

A CHAPTER ON DOILIES 

"PERHAPS no people on earth have such "set" ways of 
-t doing things as the average housekeeper. This habit 
may have grown out of the necessity of running a house on 
system. If the business of the home were not conducted in 
such a manner, the result would be confusion. But there is a 
happy medium, and we should not allow ourselves to be ruled 
and ridden by "system" to such an extent, that everyone about 
us is uncomfortable and miserable. We are all familiar, alas! 
with the woman who runs her house like a martinet, and 
who, true to type, rules every member of her household in 
like fashion. To such a person any interference with routine 
becomes a domestic tragedy. 

It is probably this ingrained desire for the familiar, the 
routine thing, that has made it so difficult for some people to 
accept any change in the treatment of table linens. This is 
especially true in the case of colored linens, in fact of anything 
outside of white damask. For years linen damask has been 
considered the correct, the only thing, for use on the table. 
There seems to be no special reason why, having always used 
it, we must go on to the end of time doing so. All innovations 
are met with more or less protest. This has been true of all 
the arts. When we look back a few years in our own particular 
craft, ceramics, and remember the storm of protest which 
arose when conventional decoration came to the front, we 
have an illustration which is very pertinent. 

It would be well for those who still hold back, to recog- 
nize the fact that after all the opposition and antagonism, the 
art has been lifted from the merely "pretty," to a dignified 
plane where, for the first time, it has been recognized seriously 
by the big art world. 

Personally I do not believe the average amateur china 
painter can be picked up from the one, and set down into the 
other, all in a moment. The wisest way is to lead by gradual 
steps to something better. It is for that reason I have always 
approved the semi-conventional. It may not be "high-brow," 
but it is a stepping stone up and away from the freely natural- 
istic, which, though you love it ever so well, is not good art 
for the china decorator. In every human being is implanted 
the love of beauty. This may mean different things to dif- 
ferent people. The -man in the ditch hangs on the wall of 
his humble home a gaudy chromo or gay calendar. Its loud 
color speaks to him a language he can understand. It means 
beauty to him, and every time his eye rests upon it, a sense 
of pleasure comes to him. Have we a right to take this away 
and give him something he can not understand? Isn't it 
better to place in his way next a better picture, and then a 
still better one, until by gradual steps he learns to accept and 
appreciate the really good picture. Much the same thought 
comes to me in regard to the public upon which the china 
decorator has to depend for patronage. It is all a slow process 
of evolution, this education of the public. But it is 
being brought about. It was unfortunate that so much of the 
first conventional work shown was purely abstract, expressed 
by geometrical lines. This was often very ugly and entirely 
lacking in beauty. The poor bewildered worker to whom it 
was given as being the correct thing, compared it with what 
she held as beautiful, and felt much as the man in the ditch. 
We have swung away from this to something infinitely better. 
A much more free and imaginative design finds favor to-day. 



Perhaps no better examples of this spirit can be found than 
in the designs of both Miss Mason and Mrs. O'Hara in the 
December number. 

Having successfully guided your public from the purely 
naturalistic and through the semi-conventional, you will 
find them ready to accept design of this sort. Here is some- 
thing that has grace of line, beauty of color, and chief of all 
something they can understand. I wonder if the rank and 
file really appreciate what they owe to the brave company of 
workers who, often at considerable loss to themselves, have 
unfalteringly followed what they knew to be the right road. 
It is the devotion of these high-minded people to their ideals 
which has brought about the splendid artistic standard of to- 
day. 

All of this discussion upon ceramics may seem a long way 
from the subject of table linen. Because we are interested 
in the designing of linen things does not signify we are less 
interested in china because of it. On the other hand, the 
artistic linen background lends so much charm to our china, 
that a keener pleasure than ever is ours in designing and exe- 
cuting it. The two subjects are so interwoven, that we simply 
must talk about the ceramic side on this page occasionally. 
Mention has been made previously of the custom of using 
numerous small doilies on the table. The effect is usually 
very fussy, a table arranged in this manner not having the 
dignity and restfulness of the more simply planned one. A 
very practical and interesting solution of the doily problem 
is found in the use of the oblong doily or table mat as it is 
sometimes called. This is large enough to hold the plate, 
cup and saucer and necessary silver. This may be used with 
a runner, its ends taking the place of mats, in which case it is 
made to come just to the edge of the table. An oblong piece 
may be used in the center of the table, or a square if table is 
that shape. There are several good points about this sort 
of mat. To arrange a table with the ordinary set of doilies 
for six people, requires a center piece, six plate, six cup and 
saucer and six tumbler doilies, making a total of nineteen pieces. 
Contrast this with one runner and four doilies, which is all 
that is necessary to set a table for six when using the oblong 
mats and runner. Rather different isn't it? So a very great 
point in its favor is the time saved in making a set. Then, 
here is a thing much easier to launder- — not only fewer pieces 
to handle but the oblong shape is easier to iron, a thing not to 
be disdained if one must rely upon indifferent laundry work. 
Then too, the table is arranged quickly and easily with so 
few pieces to handle. The editor of this page is afraid its 
readers will begin to think she is lazy, so much stress has been 
put upon the thing that can be done easily and speedily. 
Leading an extremely busy life herself, she knows only too 
well the limited time most ceramic workers have for anything 
outside their work. So many long for these lovely things 
and feel so helpless to ever find time to make them. When so 
much can be done with simple things, which are so often ex- 
tremely beautiful and with simple decoration, no one need 
despair. The secret of it all is in keeping something going. 
Picked up at odd times and with even a little done each time, 
things have a surprising way of getting finished without much 
conscious effort. 

Two mats are shown with this article, one of which par- 
ticularly illustrates what may be done with simple means. 

This mat is made of Spanish linen, ivory white, upon 
which are appliqued bands of a greyish yellow. The Spanish 
linen is one yard wide and costs one dollar and ten cents per 
yard. This was purchased some time ago and is without 
doubt much higher now. The yellow was sixty-five and has 
also advanced slightly in price. In addition to the bands, at 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



191 




each corner a short distance from the end are small crocheted 
motifs consisting of three small loops and a picot. The 
lengthwise edge was rolled and finished with a fine cross-stitch 
in yellow thread. The bands were then basted in place and 
stitched on the machine, using yellow thread for the upper 
and white for the lower. The mat is seventeen by eleven 
inches finished, about a quarter inch being allowed for turn 
in. The widest yellow band is two inches finished, and the 
narrow one a half inch. The same allowance of a quarter 
inch for turn in was made on these pieces. Baste very 
carefully and use a fine stitch on the machine. The runner 
may be finished in exactly the same way, its width depending 
upon the size of your table. There should be room between 
the runner and the edge of the table for the doily without 
crowding. 




V 



The other mat is one requiring more time to make. 
The linen of which this is made is much coarser than the first 
one. Where threads are to be drawn do not choose a tightly 
woven fabric. Any lurking profanity in one's system is bound 
to be stirred up in consequence. Dampening the fabric before 
drawing the threads is often considerable help. The proportions 
of this mat are about the same as the other one. It is finished 
with a simple edge of single crochet, with two picots a half 
inch from each corner. An inch and a half from each end is a 
row of Italian hemstitch. This is a beautiful finish for many 
things and is not difficult to do. Three threads are drawn, 
then two skipped and then again three drawn. This leaves 
a solid strip in the center and the work is done from side to 
side, from the back. A great deal of this is seen on the lovely 
foreign linens. A beautiful runner made by a member of our 
local Keramic Society had this for its sole decoration. Lines 
of it were grouped in the center and at the ends in a very 
interesting way, the whole thing being the quintessence of 
refinement. Such a runner would be choice with table mats 



like the illustration. If this plan of using table mats and 
runner is once used it is bound to find favor. Here again all 
sorts of possibilities open up. A very handsome way in which 
to work out a set is shown in one of the illustrations of Mr. 
Fry's work at Southhampton. 

On one of these tables is shown a beautiful set in which 
the mats are made of filet crochet. The centers are solid 
with a strip at each end of filet, the whole finished, if my 
memory holds good, with a plain edge. With these was used 
an oblong center piece of filet. The thread used was ecru 
"Bowstring" No. 25, and came from a firm in Chicago. I am 
uncertain whether it may be obtained elsewhere. Linen could 
be used for the body of the mats with the filet for the ends. 
A set in soft grey green linen with lace bands in grey or ecru 
thread, finished with a simple crocheted edge of the same, 
would be very good looking. A grey blue linen with crochet 
of deeper blue would make up well. With this use a still 
lighter grey blue for the napkins with a finish of the darker 
shade. Don't be afraid to get away from the old set way of 
doing things. There are so many delightful excursions to be 
made into the world of new and untried things. Why stay 
always within the narrow confines of one's own four walls. 
Anything is good for us which stirs us out of the deep rut into 
which it is so easy to settle. 

It often takes a most prodigious pull to accomplish this. 
Sometimes we need help and that is what Keramic Studio is 
trying to do for its readers. There is so much beauty in the 
world if our eyes are only open to it. The Art which touches 
the simple commonplace things of everyday life and makes 
them beautiful is the big thing after all. I have on my desk 
a leaflet which seems to me such a perfect expression of this 
thought I am quoting it. Perhaps many are familiar with it, 
but for those who are not, here it is: 

"I believe in Art, not for Art's sake, but for its enrichment 
of life, and its power to make more perfect the pleasure of living. 

"I believe in Art which can be applied to the most simple 
and useful things, making them more complete and more 
beautiful, and therefore more capable of giving enjoyment. 

"I believe the highest enjoyment of beauty comes, not 
from mere appreciation, but from the production of a beauti- 
ful object. 

"I believe that Art applied to the demands of every day 
life, and wrought by heart and mind and hand, is the greatest 
and truest Art." 




CENTER OF TRAY OF TEA SET (See page 192) 



J 92 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 
University of Pittsburg Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 




&m* 










TEA SET 

THE motif for this problem is the snow berry, a working 
drawing being made of each piece. The design was 
made to conform to that particular shape. 

The finished pieces are worked out in yellow gold, a great 
amount of care being given to the technique, as gold work 
carelessly executed is not very pleasing. No outlines are used. 

1 —1 — - I I 



JOfO 



TOP AND COVER OF SUGAR BOWL 




\ - / 

TOP AND SPOUT OF CREAMER 



\S 



\ 



nliraMCTiir 











BORDER ON TRAY 




TOP AND COVER OF TEA POT 



XA/ 




iQOt 



TOP AND SPOUT OF CHOCOLATE POT 






JJ 



v 



SEC1ICN OF TRAY 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



193 



WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 




of apple green; spots yellow, wide wavy line, orange; narrow 
wavy line, red; narrow band, violet. 

Talcum Shaker — -Trellis, red enamel. Birds, yellow breast 
shading into blue tail; backs, blue, shading into green tips; 
eyes, beaks and claws, orange; band at top, orange. 

Vase — Birds panel treated naturalistically or in enamels; 
all-over pattern of gold with touches of enamel, repeating colors 
in birds. 

Candlestick — Upright lines and bands of gold or black; 
medallion and border units in blue, green and orange enamels. 

Marmalade Jar — Two birds in back of medallion, red and 
blue enamel; two birds in front, orange and green enamel; band 
at top, green; at bottom, green; birds on cover, orange and 
green; blue knob. 



tl 



r -*i KK 






T~rr 




BASKETS 

1. Basket is 1 part Mode, 1 part Ivory Glaze. All lines in 
Roman Gold. 

2. Blue is Russian Green. Best Black for bands. Ro- 
man Gold for upper band, leaves and outline of flower motive. 

3. All outlines in Green Gold. Bands and baskets in 1 
part Air Blue, 1 part Ivory Glaze. 

4. All outlines in black. Albert Yellow. Gold. 

5. All smaller bands in black, large band in Roman Gold. 
Basket motive and background back of flowers in Yellow for 
Dusting. 

6. All dark part of basket in Dark Blue for Dusting. Gold 
(Roman) or liquid silver. 

ADAPTATIONS OF THE COLOR SUPPLEMENT 

(Continued from page 177) 

Bowl — Birds, top of head, back and wings, blue, touched 
with green; tail, blue, touched with purple; beaks and claws, 
orange; breast, light grey; eyes, red, outlines black; twigs, green; 
medallion, background yellow,with violet circle; rim, dark blue; 
Inside border, rim carried over in dark blue band; narrow band 







194 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 



sible. Gold also wears off very easily if placed on the edge 
of any thing where it is handled. If a little color is desired the 
leaves may be oiled (see direction for this in the December 
magazine) and then dusted with Bright Green and the two 
small spaces in the center of flowers are oiled and dusted with 
Albert Yellow and the remainder of design is Green Gold. 






DESIGN BY MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



^ ? 



HOW TO ENLARGE OR DIMINISH A DESIGN 

READ the lesson in the November magazine in connection 
with this lesson for suggestions for the gold work and 
also for the tracing and transferring. 

This design can be used for any size plate. Take the 
measurement of the space between the two dotted lines in 
the design and measure it around the plate. If it does not 
come out even it will be necessary to make the section either 
larger or smaller according to the amount of space left. If 
when measuring the plate the last section is a little wider than 
the rest, divide the small remaining space into as many parts 
as there are sections, for example, if there are ten sections 
divide the small remaining part into ten and add the width 
of one of the tenth to your mark on the paper thus making 
each section a little larger, or on the other hand if when meas- 
uring the plate in the first place the last section is a little nar- 
rower mark the place where the paper laps over on to the 
first section and divide that amount of the lap into ten and 
make the space on the paper the 1-10 part smaller, thus making 
each section a little smaller. If the space on the plate came 
out the same as the design make a tracing of the design ac- 
cording to instructions in the above mentioned magazine. 

If the space is changed divide one of the sections on the 
plate in half, then fasten a piece of tracing paper on the plate 
and with outlining pen and ink draw a line corresponding to 
the edge of the plate and also mark the three section lines 
of the one section that has been divided in half. Lay this 
tracing on the design so the two outer edges are together and 
the middle line of section placed over the center of the flower 
and then make a tracing of the flower and transfer it to the 
plate. It may be easier for some to just draw the flower on 
the plate without tracing, a china marking pencil is used in 
that case. Next draw the stem line of the leaves and be sure 
that the space between the stem line and the edge of the plate 
is the same width all the way. Then draw in the leaves, 
watching the shape of the leaves in relation to the stem. If 
the section is just a little larger than the design, a tracing could 
be made of the leaves by putting the left hand line of section 
on the tracing over the same one on the design and trace this 
much on the plate and then fill in the remaining space between 
the stem and the flower with one or two leaves, whatever the 
space requires. 

If the section on the plate is smaller than the design this 
same method could be followed and the leaves nearest the 
flower may be omitted. 

When a tracing of a complete section is obtained transfer 
the design all around the plate. 

This entire design may be carried out in Gold. If the 
outer line is Gold do not carry it over the edge of the plate but 
just to the edge. Gold or color over the edge of china gives 
it a heavy appearance and china should be as delicate as pos- 



A FEW SUGGESTIONS FOR A BEGINNER 

Dora Kast 

WHEN taking up the art of china painting one must begin 
right. A good foundation is absolutely necessary in 
order to make a success of it; procure a good teacher and sub- 
scribe for a good art or crafts magazine. 

A pupil should begin on a small piece of china, as one is 
apt to be discouraged before a large piece is finished. Do not 
be afraid to "rub out" should the design be on a little crooked. 
This is often the case, one thinking it will be allright and 
no one will notice it when finished. Do not hurry, be accurate, 
ask your teacher questions, she will gladly answer them, have 
a note book and jot down things you wish to have for reference. 
Do not depend upon your teacher to do your painting or out- 
lining for you, do it yourself, have her correct your mistakes 
and thereby learn more and become self reliant. 

Study your design before applying it; also the coloring; 
for a piece of china to be used on the dining table and one on 
the library table would be quite different, as to design and 
color, although the dish might be the same. A "Beginner" is 
very apt to choose a design entirely out of proportion for the 
article to be painted, just because she likes it and it is pretty. 
Therefore a great deal of time must be devoted to the study 
of harmony, color and design in order to become a successful 
china painter. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

C. H. — 1. A friend ivas cleaning quite a valuable Terra Colta vase which 
famed the gold black. How can the gold be replaced? Can Terra Cotta be fired? 

2. / used Hasburg's Unflux Gold on a pair of Belleek salt and peppers 
The gold did not come out satisfactory. I applied a thin coat for the second fire, 
with no belter results. I used Mrs. 0' Hara's enamels and think another fire 
might spoil their brilliancy. What can be done with them? 

3. Directions say that special ivhite glaze should be dusted on china where 
the acid has taken off the glaze. How is this done? Can gold and color be 
painted over the glaze after firing with satisfactory results? 

1. If the cause is just a tarnish try cleaning with powdered whiting- 
Dip a cloth in water and then in the whiting and rub over the gold. A pow- 
dered pumice may also be used but should be used with care. The only 
other method would be to apply the gold again and fire, though at a great risk, 
for such ware requires a different heat than the china that is decorated. 
Probably some terra cotta works could give you some information. 

2. The trouble is probably an over-fire as gold over-fires very easily on 
Belleek and the enamels would require too hot a fire for the gold. There is 
no remedy except to apply the gold again and give a very light fire, hardly 
a baking. Repeated firing will not affect the enamels. The gold could be 
covered with enamel if the design will allow it. 

3. The space is oiled and then the glaze is dusted on. Directions for 
this are given in "The Beginners Corner" of the December magazine. Gold 
and color can be used over it satisfactorily, unfluxed gold should be used. 

A. B. C. — In a magazine for Oct., 1914, on page 121, Anemone motif by 
Albert IT. Heck man, in first treatment for 2d fire, is the entire bowl dusted over 
design as well as unpointed pari of bowl.' 

2. In second treatment, second fire, is it just the while unpainleil parts 
that are tinted? 

1. Yes, dust over the entire surface. After it is all dusted clean the color 
from the Mode only. 

2. The entire surface in this is also covered, design as well as white part. 
Answer to B. J.'S query in last issue of Keramic Studio. 

Dampen and stretch the vellum on a drawing board. Damp freely 
the worst side of the vellum with a broad flat brush and water (do not rub it 
(Continued on page 195) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



195 




JEANNE M. STEWART - Page Editor 

611 Close-Realty Building, Toledo, Ohio. 

TRAY, YOUNG ROBIN AND CHERRY BLOSSOMS 

THIS twelve inch tray particularly suitable for short- 
cakes is done in a very few colors, the general tone 
being a Warm Grey. After tracing the design and outlining 
in India ink apply the background, shading from a delicate 
tint of Stewart's Pompeian Red on upper portion of border 
to the darkest tone below made of 2 parts of Stewart's Grey 
and 1 part Pompeian Red. Wipe out blossoms after padding 
the tint and work up delicate shadows with same mixture. 
Stamens are Lemon Yellow shaded with Yellow Brown. 
Birds are shaded with Grey with dark touches on wings of 
Stewart's Chestnut Brown and Grey. Eyes are Black, beaks 
and feet Yellow Brown and branches Chestnut Brown. 
The dark band on edge of tray is same as darkest tone in 
border. In the second fire apply dark tint a second time, 
leaving many of the blossoms underneath and if necessary to 
obtain the desired depth, dust with same mixture before firing. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

(Continued from page 194) 
with a sponge); wait till dampness disappears and turn paper on the board 
and quickly apply a fine warm glue to edges of vellum and rub down with a 
paper-cutter, taking care that paper sticks to the board. Then give all the 
surface a slight wash with water tinctured with a few drops of ox-gall, and leave 
it to dry, but away from the fire, and in about two hours it will be ready for 
use. 

U. T. — Can enamels be used satisfactorily on the Seji ware? What silver 
is the best to use on it, ivhite gold or liquid silver? 

Yes, enamels are more satisfactory than colors. White Gold is the better. 
Green Gold. call also be used on it. 

G. R. E. D. — Do not have success in tinting with Rose. It seems rough 
and pebbly in spite of grinding and padding. Why? 

2. What pink is best for a background? 

3. What is the cause of opal lustre which came from the first fire beautiful 
looking checked and crackled when taken from the second fire? 

4. In pulling pieces in lustre and gold, isn't it alright to put lustre in first 
fire? Won't the extra fire add to its beauty? 

1. Do not know any reason for it, if it is well ground, except that Rose is 
a hard color to tint with. 

2. Blood Red painted on very thin makes a pretty delicate pink though 
not a rose pink. 

3. Something must have affected the lustre in the kiln, the repeated 
firing should not have had that effect. 

4. Some lustres lose their brilliancy by repeated fires. Light Green 
usually fires a little greyer each time though it is usually safe to put lustres on 
for the first fire. 

B. E. T. — Could ivhite enamel as a foundation be tinted with the colors 
for china and used in place of various colored enamels on the market? 

2. Will Bischoff's Peach Blossom fire as it should on Belleek ware? 

3. What is best to clean liquid Platinum Silver and the lustre brushes? 

4. / often have designs which I think you could use but as 1 do not do 
water colors on anything but china, I do not know how to prepare them for use. 

1. Yes you can mix your own enamels. For delicate colors use 4 parts 
Aufsetzweiss in tubes and 1 part Hancock's Hard White Enamel in powder 
and a bit of flux and then add the color you wish. 

For dark enamels mix your paints until you have the desired color and 
then add 1-5 part Aufsetzweiss. 

2. Yes it fires alright. 

3. Clean your brushes thoroughly in turpentine first and then rinse 
them in wood alcohol and brush them lightly across the palm of the hand 
until they are dry and fluffy. 

5. C. B. — / do not have the results with my ivhite gold that I ivould like. 
I first used silver lustre, then for the 2d fire I used Hasburg's white gold. It 
did not come out nice and smooth but showed the brush marks and was generally 
uneven. Will you please tell me what ivas the trouble. Brushes and turpentine 
were clean. 

Possibly you apply the silver too heavily, it requires a very thin appli- 
cation. Try using two applications of the white gold instead of using the 
Silver Lustre. 




FULL SIZE 'SECTION JOF TRAY 



196 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



L. G. F. — Can you tell me how the cake tins, sweet tins or work of that kind 
that is being done so much now in the oil enamels is finished? I have been doing 
some of that work but have trouble in finishing, as it chips. Is there a lacquer 
used? 

No there is no lacquer used for a finish. An ordinary white painter's 
enamel is added to oil colors and this acts as a lacquer and makes it adhere 
to the tin. Possibly you applied your color too heavily and that caused it 
to chip. 

S. C. S. — -What combination of color and in what -pro-portion will make the 
Cameo used by Kathryn E. Cherry in directions for Dresser set on page 76 of 
November issue 1916 of Keramic Studio? 

2. / have trouble with outlines chipping off when I use the sugar and water 
mixture. What is the trouble? 

3. Can Satsuma ware be placed in the kiln with other china and fired at 
a rose heat or must it have a softer fire? 

1. 2 Palma Rosa Salmon, 1-2 Yellow Red, 1 Ivory Glaze will make a 
color that will answer instead of the Cameo, I do not know Mrs. Cherry's 
formula. 

2. You probably use too much sugar or apply the color too heavy. 

3. Yes, it can be fired with other china and requires almost as hot a 
fire as the hard china, the amount of heat would of course depend on what 
colors you used just as it does with the china. 

H. H. W. — Please tell me what kind of paint is used to mark the Ivory 
dresser sets. I can't make water colors, gold paint or oil colors stick. 

When marked in the stores the design is cut in and a specially prepared 
crayon used. 

The formula given to L. G. F. in this column will probably answer your 
problem also. 

M . J . V. — Dusting medium has gotten very thick, how will I thin it 
enough for use? 

2. Of all Black which do you consider the best for outlining and how to thin? 

3. When lustres become too thick how and with what will I thin them? 

4. Can you recommend enamels that will work equally well on all ki?ids of 
china. 

1. We do not know of any thing to thin them satisfactorily except to 
take a fresh bottle of the oil and put some of it with the old. 

2. Muller & Hennings Outlining Black is the most satisfactory. Thin 
it with Garden Lavender Oil. 

3. Thin lusters with Garden Lavender Oil. 

4. No enamels are very satisfactory on china unless used very thin, 
there is always a risk of chipping in the 2d fire. 

M. S. J. — I would like to understand more of the proportion of colors in 
a given composition, that is, why you would use one-tenth of a color and one- 
fortieth of another? 

2. What is the degree of heat for soft enamels? In the correspondence 
column I find between cones 017 and 018 and I use Reusche's Cone 013, yet a 
Seji boivl fired on the shelf of this kiln comes out of the fire with Us reliable soft 
enamel decoration peeling off. I would hesitate to fire another such piece again. 
In the same fire I had on the floor of the kiln, two pieces, one a Favorite and the 
other a Haviland each decorated with hard enamels. The Favorite was a 
success and the Haviland a failure, all enamels chipping off and yet I have 
fired the hard enamels very successfully on Haviland. Can anyone tell us a 
little more particularly of the degrees of heat in firing? 

1. The reason you use different proportions is to obtain a certain shade 
just as you would mix several colors together on your palette when painting 
to obtain a certain shade that you wished. 

2. Between cone 017 and 018 is the correct heat for soft enamels just 
a little hotter than 018. Your cone 013 is very much hotter and that's 
probably the cause of your trouble. One's trouble with enamels cannot always 
be laid to the firing however. The enamel medium may be too old and thick 
causing the enamels to be too fatty which will cause them to chip off, or if 
too much of the medium is used it will have the same effect. Were the two 
pieces of china in the bottom of the kiln both for first fire? Enamels on 
china are not always very satisfactory, they are apt to chip off if fired twice; 
it is safe to use enamels on the softer wares. 

[Additional answers are carried over till next issue on account of space. — Ed.] 




BORDERS FOR ETCHED CHINA OR GLASS 

Vanda U. Newitt 

PAINT the resist for the acid on all dark parts of designs. 
After it is etched and the resist removed paint a flat 
wash of Gold over the entire border both the etched part and 
the raised. The etched part will be rough and prevent the 
Gold from burnishing which will give it a different tone from 
the raised part. 



BORDERS, TO BE CARRIED OUT IN GOLD— MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



K. E. CHERRY 

CHINA COLORS AND ENAMELS 

SEND FOR REVISED PRICE LIST OF ALL COLORS 
In vials and half vials 



Special price 10 cents a half vial net for 12 enamels 
which have been eliminated from our present list. 
This offer is good until the stock on hand of these 
special vials is exhausted. See December advertisement 



The Robineau Pottery, 



Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS COLORS! 

Send for special list of 17 very fine imported glass colors; 
put up only in half vials : 
Mixing Yellow 9c. Gold Yellow 19c. Transparent Orange 16c. 

Yellow Brown 13c. Hair Brown 14c. Best Red 14c. 

Deep Carmine 20c. Rose Pink 17c. Violet Purple 40c. 

Deep Ruby... 56c. Light Green 15c. Celestial Blue 13c. 

Peacock Blue 13c. Dark Green 15c. Transparent Black.. 13c. 
Outlining Black 10c. Soft Flux 13c. 

As an introductory offer, we will send these 17 colors, one 
half vial each, for $2.25 net (list price $3.10). 

ROMAN GOLD FOR GLASS $1.00 per box 

SILVER FOR GLASS 50c. per box 

The Robineau Pottery* Syracuse, N. Y. 



A SMALL LINE OF 

New SATSUMA WARE Just Arrived ! 

More Coming Later ! 

Only a limited supply 
of the shapes shown 
on hand. As formerly 
advertised, 

SATSUMA 
has advanced 20%. 
Buy now for future use ! 

Add parcel post charges 
to your gone. 

No China Catalogue 
Issued. 

Refer to back numbers of 

"Keramic Studio" 
for shapes and prices of 
No. 121, Rose Jar 95c No. 77 3}£ in. hidh 85c "FAVORITE" China. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR "SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK. 
25c and 50c Postpaid. 
WEBER'S SPHINX GOLD 65c a box, $7.20 do«en. 

SLEEPER'S CRUCIBLE GOLD " " 

Add two cents postage for each box. 
COOVLR'S BLACK OUTLINES. CHINA PAINTERS' SUPPLIES. 

K- E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS. 
JESSIE LOUISE CLAPP, 516 McCarthy Blk., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




REMITTANCES!!! "•§ 

We prefer Money-Order or New York Draft bat if check 
is more convenient add the cost of Exchange which in N. Y. 
State is 10 cents.— KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 



THE POTTER 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO 
THOSE INTERESTED IN CERAMICS. 



Edited by FREDERICK HURTEN RHEAD. 

Published by THE POTTER PUBLISHING CO., 

Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, California 

SUBSCRIPTION $3.00 a year, 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone, but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 



^POSTPAID TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



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ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 50 

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Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 25 

Lunn'a Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D.M. Campana „ 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana „ 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 42 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New 1.00 

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The Fruit Book 3.00 

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Book of Cups and Saucers 1.50 

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Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net 6.00 

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Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

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Room No. 3 3.00 

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Above offer refers to books listed at $3.00 to $5.00 
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By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

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Liberal discount to Dealers 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. Syracuse N. Y. 



K-EL-E-/R HTM 



F^l R~EL- A^i-IV^E-* 



CONTRIBUTORS 

JESSIE M. BARD 

ANITA GRAY CHANDLER 

KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

ESTHER A. COSTER 

JETTA EHLERS 

M. JANIE LAUNT 

MAUD M. MASON 

ADELINE MORE 

DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

TILLIE PETERSON 

MAY E. REYNOLDS 

ADELAIDE ALSOP-ROB3NEAU 

LOLA ST. JOHN 

WALTER K. TITZE 

MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



fjvsonian lnst/ f r 
% 

MAR 2 8 1917 
on si Muse^ 



# 



A H0MTHLY MrtGAZmt FOR THE POTTER AMD DECORATOR 



The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright and the articles must not be reprinted without special permission 

CONTENTS OF APRIL, 1917 







Page 


Editorial 




197 


At the Sign of the Brash and Palette 


Anita Gray Chandler 


198 


Exhibit by Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 




199 


A Venetian Garden from My Lady's Balcony (Supplement) 


Dorothea Warren O'Hara 


200 


Satsuma Vase, Flower Garden Design 


Dorothea Warren O'Hara 


200 


Adaptations of the Color Supplement 


Adelaide Alsop Robineau 


201 


Medallions 


Kathryn E. Cherry 


202 


The Book Shelf 


Anita Gray Chandler 


202 


Marmalade Jar, Grape Design 


Henrietta Barclay Paist 


203, 214 


Bathroom Tiles, Wave and Mexican Motifs 


Esther A. Coster 


204 


Lamp Vase 


Maud M. Mason 


205-207 


Window Box Design 


Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 


208, 209, 215 


Mrs. Vernie Lockwood Williams 


Adelaide Alsop Robineau 


209 


The Linen Page 


Jetta Ehlers 


210 


Cup and Saucer, Bird Design 


Tillie Peterson 


211 


Beginners' Corner 


Jessie M. Bard 


211 


Jardiniere 


Walter K. Titze 


212 


Answers to Correspondents 




212 


Fruit Bowl 


Adeline More 


212, 213, 215 


Comport, Grapes 


May E. Reynolds 


214 


The White Pines 


M. Janie Launt 


216, 217 


Bowl 


M. Janie Launt 


217 


Sandwich Tray 


Lola St. John 


218 



^ B W " - ™™ ™^™ ■ , ,,, .»mii» M »M^^ 

THE OLD RELIABLE mm. FITCH KILNS 




The thousands of these Kilns in use testify to 
their Good Qualities 



THE ORIGINAL PORTABLE 



INEXPENSIVE TO BUY 
COST LITTLE TO OPERATE 




<e 



The only fuels which give perfect results in 
Glaze and Color Tone 

No. 2 Sbe 14^c 12 to $30.00 ) / No. 1 Sbe JO x;j2^n $J5.00 

No.3 Sb.f6.f9l. 40.00 GMKfln2ri * eB (W Kiln 4 ■*>* 2 Sbe 16 x 12 Jn. 20.00 

; ) No. 3 Sbe 16 . 15 in 25.00 

WRITE FOR DISCOUNTS. ( No. 4 Sbe 18 x 26 to 50.00 

STEARNS, FITCH & CO., : SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



S> 



Vol. XVIII, No. 12. 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 



April 1917 




51HE situation in regard to white china 
supplies is certainly not pleasant at 
the present time and, unfortunately, 
the prospects forthe immediate future 
are not bright. All depends on the 
duration of the war and nobody knows 
how much longer it will last, though 
there seems to be a feeling that it 
cannot last very much longer and 
should be brought to a close some 
time this year. Let us hope so. 
Meanwhile one must not forget that this trying situation 
is temporary. The only thing is to do what we are doing our- 
selves, to grin and bear it, knowing that sooner or later there 
will be a change for the better. From all reports we are receiv- 
ing there is no doubt that the interest in china decoration is as 
great as ever, the demand for decorated china is large and fac- 
tories have been working over time all over the country, but, 
with a few exceptions, individual decorators have not been able 
to get their usual share of this demand for lack of a.good supply 
of china. 

There is quite a little interest shown in glass decoration 
and a number of china decorators are taking it up. Good glass 
for decoration being made in this country, there is not the 
same difficulty in securing supplies as there is in the china 
field. One of our subscribers has lately secured a good stock 
of glass, part of which is for sale. We hope this example will 
be followed by dealers and that the number of china decorators 
who add glass decoration to their usual work will increase. It 
is a good field now and will remain a good field permanently. 
The firing of glass is more delicate than the firing of china but 
it is a difficulty which can easily and rapidly be mastered. 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL ARTS CLUB 

The Board of Governors of the National Arts Club have 
secured three more Life Memberships for the National Society 
of Craftsmen. These bonds, which are exchangeable for Life 
Membership in the club, represent a thousand dollars each, in 
cash, and were sold a few years ago to art patrons and artists 
who wished to become life members, and incidentally to help 
the Arts Club. Some are still held by wealthy art patrons. 
Including the three announced herewith, the National Society 
of Craftsmen will have six Life Memberships in the National 
Arts Club. The donors of these bonds will not permit their 
names to be made public, but they are known to be enthusiastic 
admirers of beautiful craft work and ever ready to show their 
appreciation of the same. 

The 1914 Life Membership was given to Karl Von Rydings- 
ford] for Wood Carving. The 1915 Life Membership was given 
to Dorothea Warren O'Hara for Ceramics. The 1916 Life Mem- 
bership was given to Grace Hazen for Jewelry. Although Miss 
Hazen was already a life member of the club, having purchased 
same several years ago, the jury was unanimous in their decision 
that she was entitled to the honor that goes with a Life Mem- 
bership conferred for meritorious work, the distinction between 
which and one purchased is, of course, very considerable. The 
awards are made at the December Exhibition. 



TWIN CITY CERAMIC CLUB 
Miss Mary Moul'ton Cheney, director of the Department 
of Design, Minneapolis School of Art, addressed the Club on the 
subject "The Relation of Decorative Art to the so-called Fine 
Arts." 

Miss Cheney's treatment of the subject was broad and un- 
biased. And while placing decorative art first in point of time, 
being man's first attempt at self expression, she emphasized the 
fact of the interdependence of all art and defined the function 
of each branch. She made it clear that Art is great just in pro- 
portion to the ability of the artist to express himself regardless 
of materials or classification; that Decorative Art is pre-emi- 
nently an art of service and that the expression of decorative art 
necessitates the same knowledge of drawing and composition 
as does pictorial art. 

Miss Cheney's method of teaching design is based entirely 
on the study of Principles, depending little on historic orna- 
ment or the art of the past except for inspiration. The results 
are individual development — -self expression — rather than imi- 
tation, and her conscientious and untiring zeal and uncompro- 
mising attitude toward her ideals won for her department the 
highest award at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 

H » 

COVER DESIGN CONTEST 

The Etude, a musical Magazine, has opened a design 
contest for the cover of its publication. 

First this cover must be of the poster effect, something which 
will attract attention on the news stands, etc. Secondly it 
must be musical, original and characteristic. 

Prize 1 — $25 will be given for the best Idea, a rough sketch 
or word explanation. 

Prize II — $100 will be given for the most appropriate 
Etude cover design, finished, ready for mechanical repro- 
duction. 

Designs or ideas not winning a prize will be considered 
for purchase, as the cover design is changed every month. 

Be sure the proper shape is used. The trimmed size of 
the Etude is lOf by 13| inches. Any shape larger in propor- 
tion to the above figures is usable. It is best that the finished 
original design be at least one-half larger, or 15| by 20 fa 
inches. The Contest will close May, 1917, and the prizes will 
be awarded in June, 1917. Write the name and address of the 
contestant on the design submitted. Address the Cover Editor, 
The Etude, 1712 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

K H 

NEW YORK KERAMIC SOCIETY EXHIBITION 

Change of date-The date of the exhibition has been changed, 
it will be held April 23d to May 7th inclusive. 

K H 

In a little article entitled "My Way of Selling Painted 
China," in the March Woman's Home Companion, Mrs. A. S. H. 
says: "I should like to warn ambitious people who may be 
a tempted to rent a large down-town store or window, not to dis- 
play their handiwork in this way, as people who are not scrupu- 
lously honest are often very clever at copying designs, but not 
always correct in coloring them. If you feel you must sell 
this way put one set, say a tray with tea-pot, sugar bowl and 
pitcher, in the window at a time." 



198 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



ANITA GRAY CHANDLER - - - Page Editor the variety of borders, the effectual filling of spaces, and the 
7 Edison Avenue, Tufts College, Mass. curious serpent-like ornaments upon the handles. 



*^fc^ 




AT THE SIGN 

OF THE 
BRUSH AND PALETTE 



This is Ye Old Art Inn 
where the worker of Arts and 
Crafts may rest a bit and par- 
take of refreshment. 



IT is bad taste to mix two arts," declares Rollin Lynde 
Hart, writing on "What is Good Taste?" in a recent 
issue of Home and Garden, "or to mix two types of design, or to 
violate 'known principles of color harmony', or to indulge in 
sheer humbug. Paint a statue at your peril. Never combine 
Gothic and Renaissance. Die in your tracks rather than put 
crimson next Vermillion. Never, if you value your reputation, 
simulate one material with another." China decorators might 
well apply some of this advice to their own particular work. 




Ancient Amphora Vase with interesting variety of conventional borders of 
black upon a red ground. In the collection of the Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston. (Printed through the courtesy of the Museum Directors.) 



Mr. John E. D. Trask, art director of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition at San Francisco, has returned East after an absence 
of three years. In an interview with a Philadelphia reporter 
he has this to say of modern American art: "At the present 
time in America, there are persons producing a higher grade of 
art than was ever produced consistently in any country in any 
period, and what recognition is it given? Take the people of 
Philadelphia for instance. Here there is located one of the two 
great — truly great — art schools of the universe, the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy. The other is the Boston Museum. How- 
ever, about six hundred people annually become members of 
the academy. The membership fee is ten dollars. Six hun- 
dred people out of nearly two million. Think of it!" 

The first woman member of the National Academy of De- 
sign to serve on a jury of award for that institution, is Miss Ce- 
cilia Beaux, a prize-winning artist herself. She participated 
with such men as Herbert Adams, J. Alden Weir, Kenyon Cox, 
Bruce Crane, Bolton Jones, H. A. MacNeil and Paul Manship 
in bestowing honors upon the artists and sculptors who entered 
in the exhibition last March. 

Since the last issue of the Keramic Studio two important 
events have taken place in the world of fine arts. Auguste Ro- 
din, the famous aged French sculptor has acquired a very young 
and, we trust, charming wife. The other event is one of sadness 
— the passing of that great teacher and critic, Carolus-Duran. 
He was Sargent's instructor at one time. 

And now before we close the door of the Inn, a word about 
this month's illustrations. They are two early examples of 
early "pottery painting", the ancient ancestor of modern china 
painting. Both cases are of the graceful and majestic amphora 
type, which is distinguished by two handles. The first is of the 
early Athenian style with unmistakably archaic decoration con- 
sisting of geometrical black figures upon a red body. Notice 




Graceful Classical Vase, showing the human figure as a decorative motif 
In the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. (Printed through 
the courtesy of the Museum Directors.) 

The second vase is of a later and more refined period when 
the order of decoration had been reversed. The figures are 
red upon a glazed black body and are of a mythological or clas- 
sical character, drawn with an easy, flowing grace, and not a 
little attempt at portraiture. The geometrical borders are still 
used, but quite sparingly. 

Modern decorators may well study these examples of Hel- 
lenic ceramics, for the designs have withstood the test of a thou- 
sand years and more. Those naturalistic painters who seem to 
feel that conventional design is a recent invention of a few 
fanatics may learn an obvious lesson from these ancient vases. 




-j3-^. 



WW WW WW WW 




A VENETIAN GARDEN FROM MY LADY'S BALCONY-DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

APRIL 1917 KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO 

KERAMIC STUDIO Syracuse, n.v 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



199 




EXHIBIT BY MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 



200 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



■ 



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fy 




DOROTHEA WARREN O'HARA 

132 East 19th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



A VENETIAN GARDEN FROM MY LADY'S BALCONY 

TINT entire vase with Satsuma color, pad out rather light 
and fire. After the color has been fired, divide vase 
into five sections, as the parrot is repeated five times. 

The balcony is made of Grey Violet enamel. The pink 
part of parrot is Pale Pink enamel. The white part is Wareno 
White enamel. The black bill, eyes and claw are made of 
Brilliant Black enamel. 

The dark green of stems and leaves is Green No. 2 enamel. 
The light green is Green No. 1 enamel. The light pink flowers 
are made of Pale Pink enamel, and the dark pink flowers 
are made of Italian Pink enamel. The red violet flowers are 
made of Mauvine enamel. The grey leaves and part of the 
background are Grey Violet enamel. The yellow flowers are 
made of Light Yellow enamel. The bell shaped flowers, have 
Manchu Blue enamel ends. The round flowers are made of 
Old Yellow and Light Yellow enamels. 

The enamels should be put on quite low for the first fire 
to produce a soft effect, especially in the background. 



SATSUMA VASE, FLOWER GARDEN DESIGN 

THE background of the design is Brilliant Black 
Enamel. The round light flowers are made 
of Wareno White Enamel for the white part, 
Rhodian Red Enamel for the center. The gray 
part is made by mixing equal parts of Blush Pink 
Enamel and Green No. 1 Enamel. Bright Sea Green 
is used for the green stems and leaves, except the 
heavy rim in the leaf, which is Green No. 1. The 
small round flower at top of vase is made of the 
gray mixture named above, with Rhodian Red Cen- 
ter and Persian Red stems. The bell-shaped flowers 
are Dull Violet Enamel for dark part and Pale Lilac 
for light parts. The small star-shaped flowers are 
made of Florentine Blue Enamel, for first fire, and 
in the second fire, they are edged with Mountain 
Blue Enamel. Old Yellow Enamel for centers. The 
flowers shaped like old fashioned garden pinks, are 
made of Persian Red. The rest of the flowers are 
made of Dark Yellow Enamel, Lemon Yellow Enamel, 
Rhodian Red Enamel and Old Yellow Enamel. The 
flower pot, which forms the base of the vase is made 
of Florentine Blue Enamel for the dark part, Bright 
Sea Green for the medium part, the gray mixture 
for the light part, the wavy line running through the 
light part is Rhodian Red and the small oval in cen- 
ter of larger one is Rhodian Red. The rim at top of 
vase is Florentine Blue. 




SATSUMA VASE, FLOWER GARDEN DESIGN 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



201 




ADAPTATIONS OF THE COLOR SUPPLEMENT— ADELAIDE ALSOP ROBINEAU 



202 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




KATHRYN E. CHERRY 

Marina Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



Page Editor 



MEDALLIONS 

Treatment for Enamels 

1. Leaves and stems, Azure Blue; flower, Aquamarine; 
centers of flower and buds, Jasmine; buds, Silver Grey. 

2. Leaves, Florentine; berries, Wistaria; stems, Grey Vio- 
let; head of bird, Purple Grey; breast, Satsuma; bill, Jersey 
Cream. 

3. Rose, Warmest Pink; leaves, Leaf Green; stems Warm 
Grey E; centers, Mulberry. 

4. Rose, Maiden Blush; center rose, Peach Pink; leaves, 
Grey Green; stems, Grey Violet; jar, Satsuma. 

5. Flower and buds, Italian Pink; centers, Mars Yellow; 
leaves, Meadow Green; stems, Meadow Green. 

6. Fruit, Orange 3; stems, and outline around fruit, Purple 
Grey; leaves, Peacock Green; jar, Grey Violet. 

Treatment for Dusting 
Use mirror to see repeat of designs. 

1. Leaves, Florentine; flowers, Deep Ivory; centers, Bright 
Green; stems, Mode. 

2. Leaves, Water Lily Green; fruit, Mode; birds, back, 
Mode; head, Water Blue; breast, Deep Ivory; tail, Dove Grey. 

3. Rose, Cameo; rose center, Pink; leaves, Glaze for Green; 
stems, Dove Grey. 

4. Rose, Deep Ivory; dark color on rose, Cameo; leaves 
and stems, Florentine; jar, Mode and Pearl Grey equal parts. 

5. Rose form, Deep Ivory; dark color on rose, Coffee Brown; 
leaves, Bright Green. 



6. Stems, Bright Green; leaves, Water Lily; outline around 
fruit, Deep Ivory; color in fruit, Yellow for Dusting; jar, Dove 
Grey. 

The Cleveland Art Museum has offered a course of public 
art lectures this winter together with artistic and educational 
moving pictures and illustrated talks for children Saturday af- 
ternoons. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts is also looking 
out for the art education of little people. It has a series of Sat- 
urday afternoon story-hours when myths and legends are told 
pertaining to some of the treasures within its walls. 



THE BOOK SHELF 

Anita Gray Chandler 
"Rings," by George Frederick Kunz, Ph. D., author of 
"The Curious Lore of Precious Stones." Profusely illustrated 
with color doubletone. $6.00 (Lippincott, Philadelphia.) 
Do you want to know the history of finger rings through all the 
ages and in all lands? This interesting book by America's 
greatest gem expert will enlighten you. 

"Practical Book of Early American Arts and Crafts," by 
Harold Donaldson Eberlein and Abbot McClure. 232 illustra- 
tions. $6.00 (Lippincott.) A useful book for artists, crafts- 
men, collectors, libraries and museums. 

"Famous Paintings." 2 vols. Issued in co-operation with 
Cassell & Co., the famous fine arts publishers of London. $7.50 
per vol. $15.00 per set. (Funk & Wagnalls Co.) Contains 
a large and beautiful collection of master-pieces in the galleries 
of England and Europe. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



203 




MRS. HENRIETTA BARCLAY PA1ST 

2298 Commonwealth Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



MARMALADE JAR, GRAPE DESIGN 

(See also page 214) 

r I A HE shape is Ceramic Belleek, beautifully proportioned and 
A invites decoration. The working drawing shown will be 
found to fit exactly the requirements of the piece and be carried 
out successfully either flat or in enamels. 

Outline the leaves and fruit with Mineral Black, lay the 
abstract lines, edges and handle of cover in gold. After firing, 
lay the leaves with grey green color or enamel and the grapes 
of a rich mulberry purple. Two firings should be sufficient, 
but if the results are not entirely satisfactory a third firing is 
entirely practicable on Belleek. 



The Twin City Keramic Club, of Minneapolis and St. Paul, 
held the third of a series of luncheons on February the 7th at 
the Minneapolis Art Institute. 



The March Calendar of the Minneapolis Art Institute in- 
cludes the John W. Alexander Memorial Collection of about 
thirty representative canvasses. A collection of flower panels 
in pastel, the work of Mrs. Agnes Harrison Lincoln, and an ex- 
hibition of about forty pieces of wood carving by Charles Haag, 
a Scandinavian, residing in this country, whose very unusual 
sculptures have created favorable comment in Chicago and else- 
where. In the print room will be shown the collection of 
Frances Seymour Haden, one of^the foremost etchers of lands- 
scape and marine subjects of the XIX century. There are 
about forty prints. 



204 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



WM F"i Wi 







•A, 



Y«R»t 




WAVE MOTIF 



MEXICAN MOTIF 




MEXICAN MOTIF 




WAVE MOTIF 
BATHROOM TILES, WAVE AND MEXICAN MOTIFS— ESTHER A. COSTER 

White and two or more tones of color. 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



205 




S 



MAUD M. MASON ----- 

218 East 59th Street, New York City 



Page Editor 



LAMP VASE 

THE design for the Lamp Vase may be adapted to any large 
cylindrical vase by varying the horizontal bands and 
borders. The vertical band between the units may be varied 
also if a larger form is used. The idea in the arrangement is 
to give a rich, full effect by filling the surface completely with 
the arrangement. I think, as a rule, simple color schemes 
are much the most satisfactory ones, having more dignity and 
distinction than one in which a great variety of color is used. 
Especially is this true of large objects. If simply decorated 
they fall more readily into the decorative scheme of the room 
for which they are planned. 

A beautiful and harmonious effect of color should be 
worked for — such as two beautiful blues, as Dark Blue Relief 
Enamel and Lavender or Grey Blue Enamel, or Lavender 
Blue and Grey Blue or Black and Oriental Turquoise. If a 
third color is desired, a small quantity of the complimentary 
color may be distributed through the design. 

For a very brilliant color scheme, Old Blue or Austrian 
Blue could be used for all the darks in the bird excepting the 
group of small spots under the tail, which spots could be Black. 
Stems and scrolls in Black Enamel. Outside rim of flowers, 
Vermilion. Inside circle, Light Carmine. Lines and dots in 
wings, Black. The wide band is Orange, as are also the end 
feathers of wing. The smaller feather forms in the wing are 



Willow Green, as are also the grey leaf forms. The feet of 
the bird are Vermilion, also the feather on the head. The 
beak is Orange. The group of dots in center of unit branching 
from stem, Vermilion. For the dark bands, use the predomi- 
nant Blue, with Red and Orange dots in floral band. For the 
bands of dots use Willow Green, 

The above color schemes are to be used on a soft glazed 
Belleek or Satsuma jar. The enamels mentioned are the 
Mason Colored Relief Enamels. It will give me much pleasure 
to answer any questions that may help in the successful 
execution of any of the schemes mentioned. 

Another very satisfactory way of working out such a 
design, especially on a hard glazed vase (such as French or 
German ware), and a treatment giving variety also to so much 
enamel work, is to use lustre over a toned background. 

First tint the jar all over with an even tint made of three 
parts Neutral Yellow and one part Dark Yellow Brown color. 
When dry, dust the jar to deepen the tint, with Neutral Yellow 
and give a strong firing. The unit should be repeated at least 
three times or oftener if the jar will admit it and when trans- 
fered it should be carefully outlined in ink, leaving out all 
unessential lines and drawing them outside the pattern where 
they will not interfere with the lustre, as wherever the lustre 
runs over the ink it will leave its trace, consequently the ink 
drawing should be done very delicately and carefully. 

The design is then painted in with copper lustre using a 
No. 2 and No. 7 Square shader for the work. The bands and 
lines should be carefully spaced to give the richness of effect 
desired. After firing the lustre may require going over a 
second time, usually it is richer for being gone over. 

The effect of the lustre over this color ground is especially 
attractive, being rich and lustrous without being glittering 
and affords an interesting variety in our work. 



On February 19th Miss Mary Quinn, supervisor of the De- 
sign School of Household Arts and Sciences, Pratt Institute, 
Brooklyn, gave an interesting lectiure on Linear Design — illus- 
trated by lantern slides — in the Auditorium of the Minneapolis 
School of Art. 

In speaking of her work with classes and especially with 
children, she explained her method of using music and musical 
composition as a means awaking in her hearers the sense and 
appreciation of the underlying principles common to and inher- 
ent in all art expression. 

This method of teaching is one of the most encouraging 
signs of modern education. Art at last is coming to be recog- 
nized as a unit, as universal, and correlation is supplanting the 
narrower methods of specialization. Musicians are studying 
art appreciation and seeking analogies in other departments of 
art. Painters and designers are studying music appreciation — 
musical construction and all find the same principles endure 
throughout and that the nomenclature, the terms, are inter- 
changeable. Music being the most abstract of the arts, deals 
with proportion and relation of sounds. Painting and sculp- 
ture deal with relation of form. Design is the nearest approach 
(in painting) to the abstract, hence we find more analogies be- 
tween it and music, than between music and pictorial art. ^Mod- 
ern painting, notably "impressionism" and "cubism", is an 
attempt to express abstractions in painting-JIt is unsuccessful 
because contradictory. Form, reduced to its elements becomes 
not a picture but pure design and should be identified and trans- 
planted to its proper environment. Thus the analogies and the 
different functions of the various departments of art becomes 
an interesting study for all which is absolutely necessary to the 
specialist who would make his instructions valuable. 




X 
W 
50 
> 

H 
O 




2 



H 
D 



LAMP VASE— MAUD M. MASON 



(Treatment page 205) 



to 

o 



208 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



■k 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS - Page Editor 

University of Pittsburg Home Studio, 52 W. Maiden St., Washington, Pa. 




WINDOW BOX DESIGN 

THE problem for this number is to be a bilateral design to 
fill a given space for a window box; opposite sides to 
be alike, end tiles are 5| x 7|; side tiles, each 14 | x 6J, joined 
by a narrow moulding. 

The finished problem is mounted in mahogany, with a 
detachable stand and fitted zinc lining, making the box of 
practical value. 

The colors used are Mrs. Cherry's colors for dusting. 
By careful handling all the colors may be dusted for the same 
fire, if care is taken that each color is dry before a new one is 
added. 

The large bird is Pompadour Yellow Green, Yellow Red, 
and Deep Ivory for the spots. 

The parrot Yellow Green, Yellow Red for the head, 
black bill, Banding Blue for large spots, light spots, Deep 
Ivory and Glaze. 

Animal forms Yellow Red, Yellow Green for tongues. 

Large mass of background Dark Blue for Dusting. 

Large leaf form Grey Blue. 

Leaf at base Water Green No. 2. 

Leaf back of bird Water-Lily Green No. 1. 

Light background Deep Ivory and Ivory Glaze. 

Large vein and outlines Shading Green. 

Space at base of parrot Black. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



209 



MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS 

MRS. Vernie Lockwood Williams is one of the newer mem- 
bers of the ceramic sisterhood, having come to the 
"fore" in the last two or three years. Her preparation for her 
present work was obtained at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, where 
she studied under a scholarship awarded her under the Prang 
Educational work. 

After serving for some time as supervisor in the public 
schools Miss Williams took up decoration of porcelain with 
prominent teachers and is now Instructor of Porcelain Deco- 
ration at the University of Pittsburgh, and an officer of the 
Duquesne Ceramic Club of Pittsburgh. She is an indefatiga- 
ble worker and one of the most prominent of the newer gen- 
eration. 



That the library of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts is not 
merely a suppositional convenience, is proved by this brief 
paragraph of statistics from the "Bulletin" for February, 1917: 
"The Library was used by over 1,200 readers during Novem- 
ber and December; and the Photograph Collection by 805 
students; while 3,288 photographs were lent for use outside 
the room." 



-<"^^H 





WINDOW BOX, RIGHT HAND SECTION 



(Treatment page 208) 



210 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




THE LINEN PAGE. 

JETTAEHLERS ------ Page Editor 

1 8 East Kinney Street, Newark, N. J. 

THE USE OF FANCY LINENS 

OUR little chat about table-linens this month has chiefly to 
do with the subject of materials, with a few asides on 
table arrrangement. We have in the preceding articles used 
only the plain weaves in working out the problems. These have 
been varied by the combination of colored linens, and by the 
introduction of lace insets or other needlework. By including 
figured or printed linens, or those of fancy weave, we open up 
another line along which to experiment. There seems to be no 
reason why these should not be used as well as the plain. As 
this is a decided step away from the old order of things, the 
average worker will at first hold back. Once having seen what 
charming things may be made with these materials, one's doubts 
are soon dispelled. Of course, care should be used in the selec- 
tion of materials for this purpose. Keep always in mind the 
fact of the linen being a background, and therefore use nothing 
that will stand out too loudly 

In a hunt for something to use in making the little tea set 
shown in the illustration, it was difficult to find just the right 
thing in both color and texture, but it was at last found on the 
remnant counter of one of the large shops. It means persistent 
poking about in the shops and odd places to find good things, 
but I am sure no miner digging up a gold nugget is happier than 
the individual who unearths a "find." In the large cities, of 
course, these things are easier to get at, but even the small town 
woman need not despair. Most large houses have a mail order 
department, and are most gracious in the matter of sending 
samples. Sometimes even the little country store gives up 
something from its shelves. The thing to do is to be ever on 
the lookout. 

The set shown is made of a soft grey linen, really a dress 
linen, of the variety known as non-crush. A willing testimon- 
ial is given as to its non-crush quality, as it was necessary 
when pressing, to use a damp cloth over it to get any kind of a 
clean cut fold. It is forty inches wide, and cost ninety-five 
cents per yard. The cloth was cut thirty-six by forty, as it 
was planned to use with a small oblong tea table. The nap- 



kins are fifteen inches, a favorite size for informal use. The 
material appliqued is a blue and cream white check. It is 
an English cotton material, with a thread and weave much 
like a coarse linen. There was a debate at first in regard to 
using this on linen. Upon washing a bit, however, it was found 
to both keep its color and to not shrink. The material in the 
piece was pretty "noisy," consisting of blocks of a rather 
strong bright blue alternating with the lower toned blue and 
the cream white. The lighter low toned blue being just what 
was wanted, [a sharp pair of shears soon solved the problem, 
and a few minutes work supplied the stripes needed. While 
the marrow strip on the napkins seemed just right, it was lost 
on the cloth, so it became necessary to repeat it somewhere. 
After some deliberation, it was placed near the middle, forming 
a center-piece. This square measures fourteen inches. The 
strips are a half inch wide, and an allowance of a quarter inch 
for turn-in was made when cutting them. All edges were 
turned and basted before putting together. A grey under- 
thread was used with white on top for the machine stitching. 
A bit of contrasting color was needed, and after some experi- 
menting, this was introduced by means of Italian picot points 
of a shade best described as petunia. The thread used for this 
was D. M. C. heavy mercerized cotton. It was a "find", as 
this brand is very difficult to obtain at the present time. A 
large box of odds and ends displayed on a shop counter, gave 
up this and some beautiful golden brown, which was used to 
finish a light tan set. The points are used on the napkins in 
groups of two, an inch and three-eighths from the corners, 
and a full half inch apart. On the cloth, groups of three were 
used the same distance from the corners. Groups of two 
were used at the corners of the center applique. A straight 
line was then measured from these to the edge of the cloth, 
and the points repeated there. These Italian points are very 
decorative and not at all difficult to make. An ordinary 
needle is used for working. Fasten the thread into the material, 
and then again fasten about a quarter inch from this. Next, 
pin this point down on your knee, the point facing away from 
you. Begin at the broad end of the triangle, and using the 
head of the needle first, weave in and out until the entire point 
is solidly filled. Remove the pin, and slip the needle through- 
the length of the point at the back of the work, and fasten the 
thread in the edge of the linen. Where another point is made 
close to this the thread need not be cut, but slipped through 
the hem in a blind stitch to the next space. In weaving, do 
not draw the thread tightly, or the point will not be a good 
shape. When the last stitch is made through the length of 
it, a little steady even pull will draw it into shape and make 
it compact. Of course a little practise is needed before mak- 
ing entirely satisfactory ones, but the trick is soon caught. 
They give an uncommon touch to the linens, and seem to 
supply that added bit of finish so needed at times. 

In passing, I want to speak of the great interest I have 
found in different parts of the country in this particular subject 
of table linens, and especially in regard to applique. So many 
seem to feel the appeal of this sort of decoration, and because 
of its simplicity, have been inspired to do things. It is up- 
hill work for many a teacher who is striving to advance her 
pupils and to broaden their view-point. It becomes very 
difficult to accomplish much with people who are indifferent 
and content to be just mediocre. There is a story told, of 
how many years ago, during Grant's administration, a party of 
Indians were brought to Washington to see the " Great White 
Father." During their visit, they were entertained at a 
reception in the White House, where they appeared in full 
glory of war bonnet and other nativejregalia. A fine program 
of music was part of the entertainment, but it fell upon ears 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



2H 



which were deaf to its beauties. To them, the beat of the 
tom-tom far surpassed the white man's music. It is told that 
their faces brightened as the musicians, with a medley of 
discord, "tuned up," only to fall again as the beautiful har- 



monies of the symphony rose and swelled. One can hardly 
help feeling when faced with the apathy of a certain type of 
china painter (perish the title), that they and the Indians of 
the story have much the same spirit. 




CUP AND SAUCER, BIRD DESIGN— TILLIE PETERSON 



BEGINNERS' CORNER 

JESSIE M. BARD ------ Page Editor 

Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

LESSON IN LUSTER WORK 

(Treating the above design) 

r I A RACE the design on the china according to instructions 
A given in the November, 1916, magazine, then outline 
the design with about 2 parts Copenhagen Blue and 1 part 
Banding Blue, this means that you should have twice the 
amount of Copenhagen Blue that you have of the Banding. 
These colors are to be mixed with Painting Medium. Use a 
No. 2 rather long-haired pointed shader. 

Second Fire — Oil the darker grey spaces in the design 
and also the handle (see instructions in December, 1916, 
magazine). Use a No. 3 pointed shader for the spaces and 
No. 4 square shader for the handle. Dust with Water Blue. 
Clean all the color from the china where it should not be and 
paint a wash of Light Green Lustre over the wide grey band 
and also the space next to outer edge of the china. Read 
carefully the article on Lustres by Fanny Rowell before using 
them on the china.* Use a No. 4 square shader for the luster 
*This article will be published in next issue. 



work very quickly as lusters dry very quickly and unless you 
work quickly it will show the join where you begin. When 
covering a large surface add a few drops of Lavender Oil to 
the luster. This will prevent it from drying so quickly. 
It is a good idea to clean the space to be covered, with wood 
alcohol to be sure that it is thoroughly clean for if the china 
should have finger marks on it or is dirty it will show in the 
luster when fired. Be sure that the brushes are very clean. 
The best way to clean them is to wash them thoroughly in 
turpentine as that removes paint and luster better than any- 
thing else and then rinse them in wood alcohol to remove the 
turpentine as the latter is an enemy to luster and care should 
be taken that they do not come in contact with each other. 
Rub the top of the brush lightly across the palm of the hand 
until the hair is dry and fluffy. 

Third Fire — Paint another wash of the luster over the 
wide grey band to make it brighter than the edge. Luster 
requires a rather hot fire. 

If you are planning a garden this year — and who is not, 
whether it is to occupy a yard or a window-box? — you should 
read "A Palette for Garden Making," in the March Country 
Life. The title alone is sufficient to attract the eye of any one 
artistically interested. 



212 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




WALTER K. TITZE - 

210 Fuller Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



Page Editor 



JARDINIERE 

ALL black bands and stems and outlines in conventional are 
green bronze gold or green gold. Flowers, 1 part Jas- 
mine Yellow Enamel and 1 part Jersey Cream, or with 1 part 
Jersey Cream and 1 part Canary Yellow (Cherry's). Leaves, 
Florentine Green No. 12, dots in Orange Red. Grey bands, 
1 part Pearl Grey, 1 part Albert Yellow. Naturalistic motive 
in tones of yellow, Yellow Brown, Brown Green, Violet, with 
flowers of Yellow, Yellow Brown, shadows of Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green. Leaves in Yellow Green and Shading Green, 
Warm Grey. 

Bird, head and tail in Violet of Iron with touches of Black, 
back in Yellow Brown and Brown Green with touches of Violet 
of Iron. Breast in Yellow Brown. 



FRUIT BOWL (Page 213) 

Adeline More 

PAINT leaves with Shading Green and Yellow Green; lighter 
leaves are Apple Green and Yellow for Painting. Stems 
are Mauve and Apple Green. Apples are Yellow for Painting 
and Yellow Brown and Brown Green. The Bloom is Yellow 
Brown and Brown Green. 

Second fire— Oil bowl and dust with 2 parts Glaze for Green 
and 1 part Ivory Glaze. 

Third fire — Go over the painting again with same colors 
used in first fire. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. S. L. — / painted a vase in brown green mail using your grounding oil 
and then dusted the color on and had il fired, then applied the grounding oil 
again and color ami fired again and some of the color chipped off. So I covered 
up the spots again and fired it and much more came off. What can I do with 
the vase? How can I get the remaining color off? What could I put on if T 
could get off the color as the glaze is gone? 

We wish to correct the statement in regard to "our" grounding oil. This 
publishing company does not handle or manufacture materials of any kind. 
The oil referred to is probably made by the Robineau Pottery Co. though they 
have no grounding oil unless you refer to the "Cherry Special Oil." The 
trouble with your color is probably due to having applied the oil too heavily 
causing it to take too much color. Any color applied too heavy will chip off. 
The only thing to do is to cover the design with asphaltum to protect it, leav- 
ing only the part exposed that is to be taken off and then etch the color off 
with hydrofluoric acid or a china eraser. Great care must be taken not to get 
the acid on the hands as it is very strong. Wrap a small piece of cotton on 
the end of a stick and dip it in the acid and apply to the vase rubbing it until 
the color is removed and then hold the vase under running water to remove 
the acid. 

Oil can be applied again over the rough surface and dusted as before. 

B. W. — Would il be practicable to use Mall colors for dusting a pattern? We 
admire the beautiful appearance of enamels before firing also the dry dusted work. 
Would one proceed in the same way as with ordinary dusting? 

2. Can pottery be fired in cm ordinary china kiln (mine is Revelation No. 
,?)? Would il be advisable to try to learn to do pottery from instruction by corre- 
spondence? Do you know of any one who teaches in this way? 

3. I am sending you a drawing, would you kindly give me a pretty color 
scheme? I wish to use enamels (Cherry's) on Salsuma. T will number s/:aci-s 
to simplify the work. 

1. Matt colors could be used but they are a little rough when fired, 
hard to clean, so are not practical for many things. They are dry dusted on 
the same as any other colors. 

2. No, a pottery kiln is necessary, the heat is not great enough in an 
ordinary kiln. China can be fired in a pottery kiln. Quite a little could be 
learned by correspondence, though we do not know of anyone who is teaching it. 

3. Outline around large flowers, between the two lines and lines in 
center, Chinese Blue, also Nos. 12, 9 and 15. No. 6 is Green Gold and also 
a firm band on either side of 16 and 13. No. 4 and 8 are Jasmine, No. 14 
and remaining unnumbered circles are Lavender and centers of same are 
Chinese Blue, as is also No. 7. Nos. 5, 9 and 2 are Orange No. 3. Some 
of small circles are Chinese Blue and some Orange No. 3. Nos. 1 and 10 
are Florentine No. 2. No. 11 is Grass Green. 

/. S. — / would like to learn to make jewelry and leather. What books 
would you advise? 

Silver-work and Jewelry by H. Wilson is as good as any for jewelry 
though it is more useful to one who has some knowledge of the work. I do 
not know of any book for leather workers. 

B. G. — One member of my class has been mixing Hamburg's Roman Gold 
ivilh Campana's diluting medium for Haviland china. After firing small 
spots peeled off leaving glaze. Can you tell me what is the trouble? 

Possibly the medium is not to be used for gold. Use a thin quality of 
Garden Lavender oil or if you cannot get that use turpentine. 



[Additional : 



nt of space.— Ed 




FRUIT BOWL— ADELINE MORE 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



213 



i 

TO 
O 

I 
> 

3 

r 1 
i— i 

w 



o 
w 
w 




214 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




MAY E. REYNOLDS Page Editor 

116 Auditorium Building, Chicago, III. 



COMPORT, GRAPES 

ClRST Fire — Outline the design in outlining ink, and put 
■ in tint in background of Peacock Blue. Paint in grapes 
in Crimson Purple, Violet and American Beauty. In the 
reddish tones use a little Pompadour, for the yellow grapes 
use Lemon Yellow, a touch of Apple Green and Yellow Green 
and Egg Yellow in the deep tones. Leaves in Apple Green, 
Yellow Green, Brown Green, Empire Green and Dark Green 
in the shadow leaves, Grass Green in the bright places. Fin- 
ishing Brown, Violet of Iron and Yellow Brown in the back- 
ground, also Trenton Ivory in the lighter tones of the back- 
ground. Finishing Brown and Hair Brown and a touch of 
Best Black in the stems and veins. Lay in Roman Gold in 
the design. 

Second Fire — Retouch grapes, go over the color in back- 
ground tint if necessary with Peacock Blue and lay in gold for 
the second time in design. 

PINES (Page 217) 

M. Janie Launt 

LIGHT needles are Brown Green and Shading Green; 
those in shadow are Violet and Yellow Green. Blos- 
som is Violet with touches of Albert Yellow at tip. Stems 
Brown Green with accents of Hair Brown. Background 
Light Grey with touch of Green. 

BOWL (Page 217) 

M. Janie Launt 

PINE cones, front view, Orange Yellow toned with Black 
and a touch of Hair Brown. Pine cones, side views 
Yellow Green with a touch of Brown. Dark needles and lower 
band Shading Green toned with Black. Light needles and 
upper band Apple Green with touch of Shading Green. Back- 
ground of panels tint of Yellow Green very light. Outlines, 
where used, of Hair Brown with touch of Shading Green. 





TOP OF JAR 

MARMALADE JAR— HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST 

(Treatment page 203) 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



215 




FRUIT BOWL— ADELINE MORE 

(See also pages 212 and 213) 




WINDOW BOX DESIGN, DESIGN FOR ENDS— MRS. VERNIE LOCKWOOD WILLIAMS (Treatment page 208) 



216 



KERAMIC STUDIO 





THE WHITE 
PINES 

jOR many centuries 
the White Pines 
have shared their 
divided glory of sunshine and 
shade, of snow and rain, and 
the rise and set of sun. They 
have spread their breadth day 
and night in the mountain 
ranges and in the valley 
plains. The pine seeds that 
wrought miracles — that gave 
mankind all there is of per- 
petual and beneficial force— 
the fruitage that built homes 
for humanity 2*. $>. 
Are we giving the greatest 
prophecy to the future of 
the pines? Let us lead the 
younger race of pines over 
the leagues of idle lands, so 
that this great step shall cease 
the starved soils, and make 
the swaying forests the 
Mother of every industry 
and science 3^ 3< 

— Agnes L. Scott 



CORSICAN PINE 

M. Janie Launt 

LIGHT needles are painted with Apple Green and Shading 
Green. Needle in shadows are Apple Green and 
Shading Green with a touch of Black. Outline all needles 

with a deeper value of the 
same color obtained by ad- 
ding a greater amount of 
Black to the colors. The 
tips of branches and light 
part of cones are Yellow 
Green with a touch of Hair 
Brown. Stems are Hair 
Brown with a little Yel- 
low. Outline with stronger 
value of same color. 





CORSICAN PINE 



CORSICAN PINE 



TREATMENT FOR CORNER AND PANEL 

M. Janie Launt 

CONES — Back of cones and black spots Yellow Green, 
Other parts Hair Brown. Needles, Moss Green and 
Shading Green in light ones; add Black to the following colors 
for darker ones. Background, Moss Green, Yellow Green and 
Ivory. 




KERAMIC STUDIO 



217 





PINUS STROBUS 



(Treatment page 214) 



PINUS RESINOA— RED PINE 




BOWL— M. JANIE LAUNT 



(Treatment page 214) 



218 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




SANDWICH TRAY— LOLA A. ST. JOHN 



"DAINT the outline and small dots in centers of flowers with 
■*- Black. The dark bands around the design and hexa- 

gonal forms in center of primroses are Green Gold. Tint outer 
light band on tray with Dark Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 
Second Fire — Oil the primroses and dust with Water 



Blue. Oil the leaves and stems and calyx of ragged robins 
and dust with Florentine Green, ragged robins are oiled and 
dusted with Grey Blue. Centers of flowers are oiled and dusted 
with 1 part Albert Yellow and 4 parts Ivory Glaze. Retouch 
Gold. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK r MAY 1916 






/ 




ROSE PLATE— ADELINE MORE 



WASH in the lightest tones of the roses with a very thin 
wash of Blood Red and the darker tones with Blood Red 
and a little Ruby. Light leaves are Apple Green and a little 
Yellow Green shaded with Brown Green. Dark leaves are 
Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue and a little Brown Green. 



Shadows are Copenhagen Blue and Apple Green, with Blood 
Red and Yellow Brown washes around the flowers. 

Second fire. — Retouch where necessary with same colors 
as in first fire. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF RERAMIC STUDIO 




VASE— ADELINE MORE 



OIL the light panels and dust with 2 parts Pearl Grey, 2 
Bright Green, 1 Ivory glaze. Oil the dark tones and 
dust with 3 parts Bright Green, 1 Water Lily Green. Put on 
Gold bands and fire. 

Second fire. — Roses and buds are painted with a very thin 
flat wash of Rose. Dark green touches in stems and around 



roses are Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue; the light green is 
Apple Green and Yellow Green. 

Third fire. — Wash background in rose panels with Apple 
Green very thin, then dark color in roses with Rose and a little 
Ruby and Blood Red. Retouch Gold. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF HERAM1C STUDIO 







/T*- 




CHANTICLEER PLATE-ADELINE MORE 



PAINT the back and neck of bird with Yellow Brown and 
Brown Green, the comb, beard and around the eyes with 
Carnation and Blood Red, the tail with Hair Brown and Dark 
Grey, wings in Dark Grey, the breast with Yellow Brown and 
Blood Red. Then paint leaves with Yellow Brown and Brown 



Green, the berries with Yellow Red and Blood Red. 

Second fire — Paint upper half of background with Yellow 
Brown and Brown Green; lower half is Violet and Blood Red, 
using more Blood Red on the darker tones, and add Brown 
Green for the dark tone at the bottom. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF HXRAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE BORDERS— MINNIE G. MYERS 



NO 1. Paint daisies with a thin wash of Rose and shade 
with the same. Centers are Albert Yellow shaded with 
Yellow Brown; the dark dots are Blood Red. The leaves un- 
der the daisies are Apple Green and Albert Yellow shaded with 



Brown Green. Dark background above daisies, the dark band 
at the edge of plate, the outline around bands and the vertical 
lines are Gold. 

Second fire.— Paint the two narrow bands with Apple 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF HXRAMIC STUDIO 



Green, a little Yellow Green and Copenhagen Blue. The back- 
ground under daisies is Albert Yellow and a little Dark Grey. 
The wide light band at edge and the panels between daisies are 
Rose and a little Blood Red. 

No. 2. Coloring same as in No. 1. The light space be- 
tween the daisies and the inner dark line is left white. 

No. 3. Flowers are painted with Albert Yellow and shaded 
with Yellow Brown. Centers are the same with Blood Red and 
Yellow Brown for the stamen. Leaves are Yellow Green, Ap- 
ple Green and a little Brown Green. Paint shadow leaves un- 
der the other leaves with Violet and a little Blood Red. Dark 
background above flowers, wide band at edge of plate, vertical 
lines and outline of two narrow bands is Gold. 

Second fire. — Paint the color in the two narrow bands with 



Yellow Green and Dark Grey, and the wide band near the edge 
with Albert Yellow, a little Yellow Brown and a little Dark 
Grey. 

No. 4. Paint light part of daisies with a very thin wash 
of Violet and shade with Violet and Deep Purple. Centers are 
Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown. Leaves are Apple Green 
and a little Yellow, shaded with Shading Green and Brown 
Green. Dark leaves under flowers are Apple Green, Shading 
Green and Copenhagen Blue. Shadow flowers are Violet and 
Blood Red. All dark bands are Gold. 

Second fire. — The tint between the daisies and edge of 
plate is Violet and a little Dark Grey, the remaining tint to the 
inner dark band is Albert Yellow and a very little Yellow Green. 







PITCHER, CURRANT DECORATIONS— MRS. F. C McGAUGHY 



PAINT currants wtih Yellow Red, Bleed Red and a little 
Ruby. Leaves in Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown, 
Yellow Olive and Brown Greens. Shadow ones in Copenhagen 
Blue. Background delicate blue above left side of design, 



then Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown and Brown Green, using 
background colors over shadow leaves in second or third firing. 
Retouch with same colors. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




WILD ROSE VASE 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

USE Rose for the roses. Albert Yellow in the centers with 
Yellow Brown and Brown in the dark places. Leaves 
Albert Yellow, Apple Green with Brown Green and Shading 
'Green in the dark parts. Stems Apple Green and Yellow 
shaded with Brown Green. Thorns Blood Red. Shadows 
Blood Red and Deep Blue Green. Tint with equal parts of 
Violet No. 28 and Apple Green, having the band at top and 
bottom darker. 



PLANT ANALYSIS (Page 7) 
BLACKBERRY 

M. H. Watkeys 

OUTLINE is Black. Flowers are white with yellow cen- 
ters for which use Albert Yellow. Stamens are Yellow 
Brown. Stems near blossoms are Apple Green and a little 
Yellow to which add a little Blood Red for the next tone and 
the darkest tone at the bottom is Blood Red, a little Violet 
and Dark Grey. Lightest leaves are Apple Green and a lit- 
tle Violet and Albert Yellow. For the next tone add a little 



Shading Green and for darkest leaves use Shading Green, 
Brown Green and a little Yellow Green. Background is 
Yellow Brown and Dark Grey in just a light tone. 
WILD AZALEA 

Outline with Black. Lightest tone in flowers is a very 
thin wash of Blood Red and a touch of Yellow Brown. 
Darker tone is Rose. Stamens are Blood Red used a little 
heavier. Stems and lightest leaves are Apple Green and a 
little Albert Yellow. Darker leaves are Apple Green, a little 
Yellow Green and Dark Grey with a little Brown Green and 
Shading Green added for the darkest tone. Background Dark 
Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 

THIMBLE BERRY 

Outline with Black. Blossoms are Rose with a little 
Ruby added for the shading. The lower petals in the 
half turned blossom are a very thin wash of Blood Red and 
Violet. Buds are Blood Red and a little Ruby. The lower 
stem at the right is Blood Red and Violet with a very little 
Ruby. Dark Grey added at the bottom. The remaining 
stems are Apple Green and a little Dark Grey at the top with 
Shading Green added at the bottom. Light leaves are Apple 
Green and Albert Yellow with Shading Green, Dark Grey 
added for the shading. Dark leaves are Shading Green, Yel- 
low Green, Dark Grey and a little Brown Green. Background 
is shaded from Albert Yellow to Violet and Apple Green. 
JEWEL WEED 

Outline is Black. Flowers are Albert Yellow. Stems 
are Apple Green and Albert Yellow. Light tone in leaves 
that are partly turned over is Albert Yellow, a little Yel- 
low Green and Dark Grey, the remainder of leaves is Brown 
Green, Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Green with a little 
Shading Green added for the darkest tone. Background is 
Pearl Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 

1? 1? 




BOX, HAWTHORINE— KA1HRYN E." CHERRY (Treatment page I 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 





BLACKBERRY 



JEWEL WEED 





THIMBLE BERRY ' WILD AZALEA 

PLANT ANALYSIS— M. H. WATKEYS 



(Treatment page 6) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF IVERAMIC STUDIO 








Gold with red outlines. 



Border for Plate or Platter. 
PLATE (Color Study) 

Katherine Lindsay Perkins 




To be used for sides of cup. 



-f j? 






PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 



BOX— FORGET-ME-NOTS 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
'T^HE light forget-me-nots are Deep Blue Green and a little 
-■- Sea Green. The dark ones are Banding Blue and a 
little Copenhagen Blue, centers are Albert Yellow and Yellow 
Brown. Stamens are of the Dark Blue. Leaves are Apple 
Green, a little Shading Green and Copenhagen Blue. Use 
less Apple Green for the darker ones. Background is Deep 
Blue Green and a little Violet. Bands are Gold. 

DAISIES AND BUTTERCUPS (Color Study) 

Edna Selena Cave 
■ THIRST draw design in India ink. After this is accomp- 
A plished wash in a background of warm grey or tan. For 
buttercups use Albert Yellow, Orange and a little Grass Green 
in the centers. For daisies wipe high lights from wash of back- 
ground color leaving white of china for petals, using Albert 
Yellow for high lights, Orange or Yellow Ochre for centers. 
The stems may be made with Grass and Night Green using the 
former for light and latter for dark tones. Outline in Black 
or dark tones of same color. This study would work up par- 
ticularly well on a vase or bowl. 
. *• V 
BOX, HAWTHORNE (Page 6) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
T IGHTEST part of flower is left white and a little Yellow 
-L' is washed overjt in the second fire. The darker tone 
is Rose. Centers, are Albert Yellow, shaded with Yellow Brown 
and Brown Green. Stamens are Brown Green and a little 
Yellow Brown. Buds are Rose with a little Blood Red added 
for the shading. Leaves and stems are Shading Green, Copen- 
hagen Blue and a little Dark Grey. Background in center 
of lid and top and bottom of box is Apple Green and a little 
Copenhagen Blue. The edge of lid and center of box is Rose 
and a little Albert Yellow. Bands are Gold. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, JUNE 19 16 




SEMI-CONVENTIONAL PLATE, ROSES— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



OIL the dark grey tones in the medallion between the roses 
and the grey band near the edge of the plate and dust 
with Florentine Green. Oil the large background space in 
the same medallion and dust with Pearl Grey and a little Al- 
bert Yellow. Paint the realistic roses with a thin wash of 
Rose and shade with the same color used a little heavier. Leaves 



are Apple Green and a little Yellow. Dark leaves are Shad- 
ing Green and Copenhagen Blue. All of the black tones in 
the conventional part are Green Gold. Centers of conventional 
roses are Yellow Red. 

Second Fire — Retouch roses where strengthening is needed 
with Blood Red and Rose. Retouch Gold. 



10 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




VASE, BIRDS AND YELLOW DAISIES— ADELINE MORE (Treatment page 16) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF ItERAMIC STUDIO 



u 




VASE, BIRDS AND YELLOW DAISIES— ADELINE MORE 



(Treatment page 16) 



12 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF 11ERAMIC STUDIO 






BORDERS— W. K. TITZE 



WHICH can be applied to all shapes, lengthened and 
shortened as desired. 
No. 1 — Conventional design in gold, rose motive can be 
painted in with enamels or color. Paint in the roses with any 
standard pink or rose. Leaves in the different tones of greens, 
greys and purples. Use Deep Blue Green for the suggestions 
of Forget-me-nots. 



No. 2 — Lines and basket motive are gold. Bands are 
Grey Green. Flowers any standard pink or rose. Leaves 
in the different tones of green and violet. 

No. 3 — Forget-me-not motive in Gold outlined with Black. 
Centers with Italian Pink enamel. Band is Turquoise Blue. 
Background of the realistic spray is, Yellow, Yellow Brown, Deep 
Blue Green and Violet. Leaves Yellow Green and Brown Green. 




BOWL IN ELDERBERRIES— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 



(Treatment page 16) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF RERAMIC STUDIO 



13 




FLOWER DRAWING, BUTTER AND EGGS— MARION L. FOSDICK 



HALF motif No. I and II. Oil light part of leaves and dust 
with equal parts Florentine Green and Bright Green. 
Oil light part of flowers and dust with Yellow for Dusting. 
All dark tones are Gold. 

Motif No. III. Oil leaves and stems and dust with Water 
Green No. 2 and the light space in stems with Bright Green. 
Dark tone in flower is dusted with Deeplvory and the light 
tone with Yellow for Dusting. 

Nos. IV, V. All dark tones are Gold. Paint a thin wash 



of Yellow Lustre over the flowers for the second fire and re- 
touch Gold. Paint light green lustre in light places in leaves 
of No. V. 

No. VI. Oil leaves and dust with Water Lily Green and 
a little Dark Grey. Stems are dusted with Mode. The dark 
part of flowers is dusted with Coffee Brown and the light part 
with Yellow for Dusting. 

No. VII. Semi-Conventional border — all dark tones, 

(Continued on page 16) 



14 NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 






-4^ 





£|— WiOli 



A Bul-^r * and - &cf£3 . 



FLOWER DRAWING, BUTTER AND EGGS— MARION L. FOSDICK 




NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 

: "Half mnotif 



15 




i(?p Q 







FLOWER DRAWING, BUTTER AND EGGS— MARION L. FOSDICK 



16 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF ttERAMIC STUDIO 



(Continued from page 13) 

bands and stems are Gold. Leaves are painted with Apple 
Green and a little Yellow Green. Flowers are Albert Yellow 
and a little Yellow Brown. The diamond shaped figures are 
Yellow Brown and Yellow Red and also touches of it in the 
small light space in flowers. 

No. VIII. Oil the flowers and dust with 2 parts Cameo 
and 1 part Peach Blossom. All dark tones are Green Gold. 
The light bands are a grey, painted with Dark Grey. 

No. IX. Outline and dark tones are Gold. Leaves are 
oiled and dusted with Bright Green and the flowers with Grey 
Blue. The large space in the design in the border is Bright 
Green. The wide plain border may be painted with Dark 
Grey and a little of the Grey Blue. 

No. X. Large motif and Border No. 1 — Outline with 
Dark Grey and a little Black. Paint leaves and stems with 
Apple Green, a little Yellow Green and Dark Grey. Light 
part of flowers with Albert Yellow and the dark tone with 
Yellow Brown. The bands with Yellow Brown and Dark 
Brown. 

Border No. 11 and III. All dark parts of design are Gold. 
Leaves are painted with Apple Green and Yellow Green and 
flowers with Albert Yellow, and a little Yellow Brown. The 
wide bands are Albert Yellow and a little Dark Grey. 



BIRDS AND YELLOW DAISIES (Pages 10, II) 

Adeline More 

OIL the vase with Dusting Medium. Pad the oil until it 
is quite dry. The pad must be free of oil after padding. 
Allow vase to stand one-half hour then dust with Glaze for 
Green, then fire. 

Second Fire — Paint birds with Yellow for Painting on 
breasts, heads Yellow Brown and Blood Red; backs Yellow 
Brown and Dark Green, with Black in darkest places in the 
wings and tails. The feet are Yellow Brown and Brown Green. 
Stems are Mauve and Brown Green. The flowers are Albert 
Yellow, Yellow Brown, Yellow Red. Auburn Brown in the 
centers of flowers. The leaves are Brown Green. 

Third Fire — Use same colors used in the second fire, wash 
some Violet touches around the flowers. Use Mauve, Yellow 
Brown and touches of Brown Green. 

BOWL IN ELDERBERRIES (Page 12) 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

PAINT wide bands and bands forming panels in Deep Ivory. 
Lines are Gold. Leaves, Lemon Yellow, Yellow Green, 
Olive and Brown Green, and Yellow Brown in shadowy 
ones. Berries in Banding Blue, Violet Ruby and Black. Re- 
touch with same colors. A cooler treatment would be to use 
Copenhagen Grey bands, White Gold lines and shadow leaves 
in greys. 

COCKATOO VASE (Supplement) 

Katherine Lindsey Perkins 

DRAW in birds and background figures with Copenhagen 
Blue and fire. For second firing, tint whole vase with 
special oil and dust in Pearl Grey 3 parts, Pink 1 part for cen- 
ter. Shading Green and Violet at bottom, blending into Grey 
Green. Shading Green and Banding Blue and Grey for Flesh 
at very top. Wipe out background figures and go over with 
Violet, Grey Green, Copenhagen Blue and Shading Green, 
mixing the colors in the different leaves to make a harmonious 



whole. Flowers shade toward a yellow at the ends. The 
study having been photographed from a colored study, the 
darkest spots were yellow in the original. The birds are Al- 
bert Yellow and Yellow Brown on the necks and breasts and 
dark spots in tails. Yellow Green on heads in half tone, and 
the greyish tones are shaded from light blueish violet into 
Banding Blue, Violet and Copenhagen Blue. Bills greyish 
green and blue. 

Last Fire— Strengthen all colors bringing into promin- 
ence the principal parts. The yellow of breasts is toned down 
with Yellow Brown and Grey on the tails. Violet and Brown 
touches in the branches. ■ 

FLOWER GARDEN BOWL (Supplement) 

Dorothea Warren 0' Kara 

OUTLINE with Outlining Black. Enamels used are War- 
ren O'Hara Color Co.'s soft Enamels. The very dark 
blue is Old Chinese Blue Enamel. The green is Green No. 2 
Enamel. The orange red is Rhodian Red Enamel. The dark 
yellow is Old Yellow Enamel. The light yellow is Light Yel- 
low Enamel. The white is Wareno White Enamel. The 
pink flowers are Old Chinese Pink Enamel. The two light 
red flowers are, equal parts of Lakey Red Enamel and Old 
Chinese Pink Enamel mixed together. Use Warren's Enamel 
Medium sparingly. Just enough to barely gather the enamel 
together, then thin with pure, fresh turpentine, and grind on 
ground glass slab until creamy, so the enamel floats on easily 
from point of brush. 




PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 



II 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, JULY 1916 




SHELL PLATE-MADELINE MORE 



PAINT the large shell with a thin wash of Rose and a very 
little Yellow Brown and add a little Violet for shading. 
The inside of the large flat shell is Deep Blue Green with a 
little Banding Blue and Violet for Shading; the shadow from 
the shell in front of it is Blood Red, the dark edge is Violet, 
a little Blood Red and a little Dark Grey. The two small 
shells are Lemon Yellow with a little Violet and Brown Green 
for shading. The remaining shell is Violet, a little Blood Red 



and Yellow, Brown and the dark center is Violet and a little 
Banding Blue. Dark background around shells is Copen- 
hagen Blue, Violet and Blood Red. Water lines are Deep 
Blue Green and Turquoise or Sea Green. The sea weed is 
Albert Yellow and a little Apple Green. The light tint is Al- 
bert Yellow shaded into Blood Red and Violet, all should be 
applied very light. 



18 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF RERAMIC STUDIO 




CUP AND SAUCER, ASTERS— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 
Bands Lavender Glaze. Asters Banding Blue and Violet, Centers Yellow, Yellow Brown. Background Ivory and lines Gold. 





TEA POT, ROSE DESIGN— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 



(Teatmcnt page 23) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



19 




SMALL PLATE, ROSE BORDER— DORRIS DAWN MILLS 

Design between flowers Gold. Use Rose for roses, Albert Yellow, Apple Green, Brown Green and Shading Green for leaves. 

Tint very light cream. 






SALTS AND PEPPERS— DORRIS DAWN MILLS 



(Treatment page 23) 



20 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF HERAMIC STUDIO 






PLATE IN YELLOW ROSES— IDA NOWELS COCHRAN 

T> OSES painted delicately in Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown Auburn Brown and Yellow Red. Shadows under roses and 

1V and J ust a touch of Yellow Red in centers. Shadows leaves, Brown Green. Conventional design outlined in Gold 

on roses Brown Green. Leaves in Yellow, Yellow Brown, and painted in Yellow Brown Lustre. Background at edge, 

Brown Green, Auburn Brown and Yellow Green. Stems, Yellow Brown very pale. Center of plate very pale cream color. 




BOWL VIOLETS— DORRIS DAWN MILLS 

Black bands Gold; light band at top Apple Green. Tint at bottom, light Albert Yellow. For flowers use Violet No. 2 and 

Deep Blue Green. Leaves Albert Yellow and Apple Green in the light part and Brown Green 

and Shading Green for the darks. Shadows Apple Green and Violet. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



21 




PLATE— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



PAINT roses with very thin wash of Rose leaving the high conventional leaves are Green Gold. The grey band near the 

lights almost white, shade with the same color using it a edge of plate may.be painted with Light Green lustre or with 

little heavier. The light daisies are Deep Blue Green and a Apple Green and Yellow Green paint equal parts, 
little Violet; the dark roses are Violet and Banding Blue: cen- Second Fire— Strengthen flowers where it is necessary 

ters are Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown. Dark bands and with the same colors as in first fire. .Retouch Gold. 



22 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF RERAMIC STUDIO 



SUMMER SCHOOL NOTES 

Mr. Marshal Fry's Summer School will open in July and 
last during August and September. It will be primarily a 
school of design in its application to handiwork, interior decor- 
ation and landscape painting. 

One of the important courses will be overglaze keramic 
decoration under Marshal Fry and special instructors. Various 
interesting wares of plain color, such as Wedgewood, Italian 
Capri, etc., will be used besides white china. 

Table decoration will also be an important feature. An- 



other interesting feature will be a class of drawing for children 
under Miss Ophelia Foley. 

Students may select what courses they prefer and spec- 
ialise in any branch of work. For particulars address Marsh- 
al Fry, Southampton, L. I., N. Y. 

» K 

Mrs. C. C. Filkins of Buffalo, N. Y., has opened a summer 
school for the month of July at her studio on Main St. where 
a course of study in acid etching, flown enamels, etc., wilfbe 
given. Write to her for circulars and particulars. 




ROSE PLATE, ADELINE MORE 



ROSES are painted with a very thin wash of rose and shaded 
with the same color used a little heavier with a very 
little Violet added for some of the deeper shadows; light leaves 
are Apple Green and a little Albert Yellow and a little Brown 
Green added for the shading and strong touches. Dark leaves 



are Shading Green, Copenhagen Blue and Brown Green. 
Shadow leaves are Dark Grey, Blood Red and Violet; back- 
ground is a very thin wash of Lemon Yellow blended into 
Blood Red and Violet No. 2; stems are Brown Green and a 
little Blood Red, 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



23 



SALTS AND PEPPERS (Page 19) 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

NO. 1. Tint cream. Wild roses are made with Rose. 
Centers Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown and Brown. 
Leaves Albert Yellow, Apple Green, Shading Green and Brown 
Green. Stems and shadows Blood Red and Deep Blue Green. 
Dark band at top and lap Gold. 

No. 2. Top and band Gold. Tint cream band at bottom 
Russian Green. Roses made with Rose. Leaves as others. 

No. 3. Darks, Gold. Bands Deep Blue Green. Forget- 
me-nots Deep Blue Green and a little Violet. Leaves same 
as others. Tint cream. 



TEA POT, ROSE DESIGN (Page 18) 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 

OIL wide band and handles with special tinting oil and 
pad carefully, dust with a mixture of Pearl Grey 1 part, 
Ivory Glaze 1 part and Chrome Water Green 1-2 part. This 
makes a very pretty soft green. Paint roses first time with 
Rosa, retouch with Peach Blossom and touches of Ruby. Leaves 
in Yellow, Olive and Shading Green, shadows Copenhagen 
Green Blue. Lines in white gold. Handles may be same. 




BOWL, OR PLATE DESIGN— W. K. TITZE 



This design is prepared as the design on No. 2, using Florentine Green as the background. Water Green is a good color 

if a darker background is desired. Cut out the roses and spider web. Paint in roses 

with any standard make of Pink or Rose. 



24 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF HXRAMIC STUDIO 



DOROTHY PERKINS ROSE (Supplement) 

M. G. Myers 

FIRST Fire — Use a thin wash of Yellow in light parts of 
roses and Carnation in warmer tones, or use some reliable 
Rose and Lemon Yellow for lighter and more Rose or a little 
Carnation in stronger tones. Violet and Yellow for cool shad- 
ows and add Violet to Carnation for warmer shadows. Paint 
the centers with Albert Yellow, Egg Yellow, Yellow Brown, 
with a touch of Yellow Green and Brown Green. For the 
very dark roses in shadow use Ruby with a little Black. 
Leaves, Albert Yellow, Apple Green, Yellow Green, Brown 
Green and Dark Green in the darkest values (in the first fire 
only). A touch of Brown or Carnation may be added to leaves 
and will give a warm tone. Use Violet and Albert Yellow and 
a touch of Brown Green for the trellis. The background may 
be left for second fire if so desired. Warm tones, Albert Yel- 
low, Yellow Brown and Yellow Green. Cool tones, Violet, 
Violet and Apple Green and a little Copenhagen Blue, if de- 
sired. 

Second Fire — Wash Rose over the lighter roses. Rose 
and Ruby over the dark ones. Touch up centers. Strengthen 
greens where necessaiy, also background. Add crisp little 
touches in both roses and leaves. 

Third Fire — Draw background and roses together in light 
side by thin wash of Pearl Grey and Violet, on warmer side 
Ruby, Green or warmer Yellow as needed. Give the roses 
in shadow a thin wash of Blue. 

WATER COLOR TREATMENT 

W T ash in light roses with Pink and Rose Madder, with 
a touch of Lemon Y'ellow, or Alizarin Crimson and a lit- 
tle Yellow and Vermillion. Use Violet and Yellow in shad- 
ows. Lemon Yellow and Indian Yellow with a touch of Green 
in centers. Stamens, Olive Green Lake, Hooker's Green 
and Burnt Sienna. Use the same colors for roses of darker 
value only more intense, with a touch of Cobalt Blue in the 
shadows and a little Green next to leaves, also some of the 
rose color in the leaves. Add more Cobalt in shadow roses, 
with touches of Purple Lake or Hooker's Green added to Aliz- 
arin Crimson or Carmine. Wash in light leaves with Lemon 
Yellow, Emerald Green or Hooker's No. 1. Use Hooker's 
No. 2 in darker values, warm with Burnt Sienna or suppress 
with Red used in roses or Violet as needed. Stems, Cobalt, 
Carmine and Olive Green Lake. Paint the trellis with a wash 
of violet made of Cobalt and Carmine and Olive Green Lake. 
W~arm background, Gamboge, Indian Yellow and wash of 
Carmine below shadow roses. Cool tones, Green and Cobalt 
and Carmine with a touch of Indigo if desired. 




JOSEPHINE YOUNG 
Exhibition of the Keramic Society of Oreater New York 



NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler . 

"The Appeal of the Picture," by Frederick C. Tilney, 
Illustrated. Dutton and Company, publishers. $2.50. The 
author has given the fruits of his long experience in art teach- 
ing and criticism in this work which will enable one to really 
understand pictures, to get beyond the "I know what I like" 
stage. 

"The History of Sculpture," by Harold North Fowler, 
Ph.D. Macmillan Company, publishers. $2.00. Dr. Fowler 
has dealt in a most readable and instructive manner with the 
art of sculpture from its source in Egypt and Babylonia to 
its present state in Europe and America, even going so far as 
to give a list of the promising young sculptors of to-day who 
may be expected to be famous to-morrow. Both the ancient 
and modern methods of making statues has been described. 
The book is neither so deep as to confuse the casual reader, 
nor so shallow as to bore the scholarly. It is profusely illus- 
trated with photographs of famous sculptures from all over 
the world. 

"The Midsummer of Italian Art," by Frank Preston 
Stearns. Illustrated. Badger, publisher. $2.00. Four of 
the greatest painters of all times — Michael Angelo, Raphael, 
Leonardo Da Vinci, and Corregio — are comprehensively dis- 
cussed and compared. The art student will find this work 
most valuable. 

TILE, CUP AND SAUCER (Supplement) 

Wm. K. Titze 

TREATMENT No. 1— Oil and dust all dark bands (leaves) 
and dark space behind flower motive with 1 part Dark 
Blue for Dusting, 1-2 part Mode and 1 part Glaze for Blue. 
Light spaces, use Glaze for Blue. All outlines and small 
bands to be Roman Gold. Flowers and buds are left white 
or White Gold can be used. Centers of flowers, Goldenrod 
enamel (Cherry's). 

Treatment No. 2 — If a soft green ground is desired use 
2 parts Glaze for Green and 1 part Ivory Glaze. Second tone 
bands are Glaze for Green. Buds and flowers are White Gold 
Fire. 

Second working — Dark spots (leaves) and ground behind 
flower motive, oil and dust with 1 part Water Blue and 1 part 
Dark Blue for Dusting. All outlines are Roman Gold, use 
the unfluxed over painted surface. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Miss Peacock's Antique Shop is open at 104 South Street, 
Freehold, N. J. Miss Peacock has been collecting beautiful 
old things, both here and abroad, for a number of years, and 
to these she has added other things modern, but still beautiful. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 

E. R. E. .1 want to etch some china bid hare never done any oj the work. 

Please tell rne as much as passible about the process. 

.2. Also can you tell me any preparation I can get to touch up chipped 

places, the paint that chipped off is Black. If I could get some preparation to 
put on that would stand firing or better still stand washing and wear 1 would pre- 
fer that. 

1. You will find a full treatment for etching in the Answers to Corre- 
spondents column for June. 

2. There is no preparation to use. The only thing to do is to chip off 
all that you can and paint it again and fire, though there is danger of more 
chipping the next time. The color can be painted on and when thoroughly 
dry a coat of white shellac paint over it and this will wear if not wa.shed too 
often. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, AUGUST 1916 




SALAD OR FRUIT SET— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



DIVIDE bowl into five sections — trace design in carefully, 
then paint in leaves with Apple Green, a little Shading 
and a bit of Violet. The berries are washed in flat with Tur- 
quoise Blue and Banding Blue. The caps are Yellow Brown 
and Blood Red, then put the Green Gold on, then paint the 
background a wash of Yellow for Painting with a little Dark 
Grey, then fire. 



Second Fire — Paint dark in leaves with Shading Green 
and a little Dark Grey. Then paint the shadow side of berries 
Blue. For the shadow around in background use Yellow and 
Yellow Brown. Go over the gold again. 

Third Fire — Oil the bands and dust with (Cherry's) Coffee 
Brown, then outline design and put final washes where needed. 



26 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




ALICE W. DONALDSON 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



27 




BLUE POPPY VASE— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 

OAINT poppy with Banding and Royal Blue, Ruby and Paint top of vase with Black and Banding Blue using sort of 

•*- Black in darkest touches. Center is Yellow Green sky effect on white china. Second Firing— Oil vase with special 

and Dark Green; stamens Black. Leaves Yellow, Olive and tinting oil, pad carefully. Let stand for an hour or so then 

Dark Greens, finishing all as much as possible in one firing, dust with Mason's Azure Glaze. 



28 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE, ORANGE BLOSSOM— MARIE WITWER 

Transfer gold design and paint in flowers with Fry's Violet No. 2 and Lemon Yellow for the white shadowy effects. Stamens 

Albert Yellow. Leaves Yellow Green, Brown Green, Shading Green. Second Fire— Tint in warm 

background and retouch leaves and flowers when needed, and go over the gold. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



29 









CUP, SAUCER AND BOWL, ORANGE BLOSSOM MOTIF— MARIE WITWER 



30 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




NASTURTIUM— MARION L. FOSDICK 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



31 




WILD MORNING GLORY— P. H. WATKEYS 



(Treatment page 32) 



32 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




SATSUMA BOX 

Kathryn E. Cherry 

PAINT roses with a very thin wash of Rose using it a little 
heavier for the shading and add a little Blood Red for 
the center. Light leaves and stems and buds are Yellow Green, 
a little Shading Green and Dark Grey. Dark leaves are Shading 
Green, Brown Green and a little Yellow Green. Background 
is Albert Yellow used very thin and a little heavier back of 
roses. Bands are Gold. Dark spot in bud is Blood Red and 
a little Ruby. 

*r & 

PLATE, CUP AND SAUCER (Supplement). 

Mabel Emery. 

THE outline may be omitted, but if it is preferred use Dark 
Grey and a little Violet, the dark tone may be painted 
with Violet or Mauve and a little Dark Grey and the light tone 
is Dark Grey with just a little of the Violet. 

If outline is to be omitted, the dark tone is oiled and 
dusted with Mode; the oil should be applied as thin as possible. 
The light tone is oiled and dusted with 2 Pearl Grey, 1 Ivory 
Glaze and just a touch of Violet or Mauve. The flower and 
bud may be outlined with either the Silver or with Violet and 
Dark Grey, and the flower shaded with Albert Yellow and a 
little Violet. 



NASTURTIUMS (Supplement). 

M. H. Watkeys. 

FOR lightest flowers use Lemon Yellow and a little Brown 
Green and a little Violet added for the deep shadow tone; 
markings are Yellow Red and Blood Red. For darker yellow 
petals use Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown and Violet. For 
red blossoms use Yellow Brown, Carnation and Yellow Red, 
with a touch of Ruby for the darkest tone. For the darker and 
blossom use Blood Red, Carnation and Ruby. Light tone in 
stems and leaves is Yellow Green and Albert Yellow. For the 
middle tone use Yellow Green, Shading Green and Brown Green. 



For darkest tone, Shading Green, Copenhagen Blue arid Brown 
Green. Background, Dark Grey and a little Albert Yellow. 
WATER COLOR TREATMENT 

Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 

A sheet of Whatman's not pressed paper, or any illustra- 
tor's board of good quality, will be the best paper to paint the 
Nasturtium study on by M. H. Watkeys. Having no back- 
ground and no large washes the dampened paper is unneces- 
sary, and would rather interfere with the clear-cut outline of 
the flowers. Although the study is not a truly conventional 
one, yet it leans that way and is better adapted for decorative 
purposes than the purely realistic painting. 

The first step is to make a good pencil sketch of the whole 
subject. Seek for proportion and secure the larger lines and 
masses first; when they are correct there will be little trouble 
in filling in the smaller ones. Remember also to study the 
shapes of the white paper between the penciled line of the flow- 
ers. Those white vacant masses form part of the decoration 
as well as the flowers and finding their correct shape will greatly 
. assist the drawing. 

For the color of the deep red nasturtium use Vermilion, Ali- 
zarin Crimson and Orange, not necessarily all mixed together, 
but broken as in the original. A very little French Blue should 
be used in the deepest spots. The. flowers are all painted with 
the same colors, sometimes more of one and then the other. 
The delicate flower in the center should have Lemon Yellow as 
its foundation. The shading is of Black. French Blue will 
be useful in shadows that have a greenish cast. For the leaves 
use Hooker's Green No. 2, varied with Yellow Ochre, a little 
Alizarin Crimson and French Blue. For the stems, more Yel- 
low must be added and when dry use the Green for the shadow. 
The French Blue will be required in the deepest part. 

It will be well to make a foundation color of the same value 
as the light veins; let it dry before painting the surrounding 
green. If a full brush of color is used the edges will be sharp. 
Where the veins are dark they must be added after the delicate 
line. Outline of the whole subject could be drawn with a pen 
filled with color. It can also be safely omitted. It is put in to 
help the decoration. 

WILD MORNING GLORY (Page 31) 

P. H. Watkeys 

OUTLINE with Dark Grey and Black. Dark leaves are 
oiled and dusted with 2 Water Lily Green, f part Dark 
Grey and a little Shading Green. The turned over part of 
leaves and the calyx of buds are Glaze for Green. Light 
leaves are Florentine Green. Stems are Mode, dusted on 
very lightly. Blossoms are equal parts Cameo and Peach 
Blossom. The marking of blossom is painted with a very 
thin wash of Lemon Yellow toward the edges with a little Yel- 
low Brown added toward the center and a little Apple Green 
for shading next to the center. Background is oiled and dusted 
with 3 parts Pearl Grey, I Ivory Glaze and 1 Yellow for Dust- 
ing. 



(3&&M 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 19 16 



VASE (Supplement) 

Mary F . Overbeck 
F)AINT whole vase with Ivory and fire. Outline entire design 
* with Baby Blue mixed with a little Deep Blue Green and 
Black. Centers of flowers Yellow Brown with a little Yellow 
Ochre. Flowers, Yellow Carmine. Leaves and stems, Apple 
Green with a little Olive Green and Black. Background, Violet 
for Grapes with a little Ruby added. 

To be carried out in enamels. — For the blue outline, flowers 
and remainder of design use 3 Celtic Green and 1 Night Blue 
For the pink tone use 1 Warmest Pink and 1 Special White Enamel. 
Second Fire — Paint the green enamel with 3 parts Florentine 1 



and \ part Grass Green. Yellow centers with Jersey Cream 
Enamel. Lavender background, 1 Silver Green, 1 Grey Violet. 
if i? 
BOUILLON CUP, SAUCER, PLATE, ETC. (Supplement) 

Albert W. Heck-man 

TO be done in two colors: Green and Yellow. First Fire — 
Outline all flowers and leaves and paint in bands with 
Green. Use Yellow Green, Shading Green and a little Albert 
Yellow. Second Fire — Touch up lines if needed and paint in 
the roses with a flat wash of Lemon Yellow. Background to 
be left white. 






ROSE BORDER AND PANELS— M. G. MYERS 



PAINT light roses with Lemon Yellow, using Albert Yellow 
and a little Brown Green for the shadows and Yellow 
Brown and Albert Yellow for the center. Dark roses are 
painted with Blood Red and Rose and a little Ruby added 
for Blood Red for the shadows. Leaves are Apple Green, 



Yellow Brown and Brown Green, and Shading Green and Co- 
penhagen Blue for the darker, tones. Background is shaded 
from a thin wash of Albert Yellow to Yellow Brown, Apple 
Green and Violet near the flowers. Bands and dark lines are 
Gold. 



34 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



GAME PLATE— ADELINE MORE 



THE light parts of birds are left white. The light grey tones 
are Violet and a little Albert Yellow with a little Blood 
Red added for some of the darker shading. Dark places on wings 
are Copenhagen Blue and Banding Blue. Eyes are Black with 
Yellow Brown for the marking around them. Feet and bills are 
Yellow Brown and a little Yellow Red with some strong Yellow 
Red touches. The ground is Brown Green and a little Yellow 



Brown painted very thin and Blood Red and Violet added for the 
distant tone. Water is Apple Green, Banding Blue and Deep 
Blue Green. The tall grass is Apple Green, a little Shading Green 
and Copenhagen Blue. Sky is Albert Yellow, Deep Blue Green, 
and Blood Red painted very thin. Copenhagen Blue and a little 
Violet at the horizon. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



35 




SIX PLATE DESIGNS— ADELINE MORE 



(Treatment page 40) 



36 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




LADY SLIPPER— MARGARET HUNTINGTON WATKEYS 



(Treatment page 40) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



37 





BOWL, BLACKBERRIES— F. C. McGAUGHY 



T>AINT berries in Banding Blue, Violet, Ruby and Black; leaves lines forming panels in Gold. Retouch in same colors. Inside of 

J- in Yellow, Yellow Brown, Yellow Green, Olive and Dark bowl, tint and pad Ivory Glaze; fire; then use bands of gold and 

Green; background, Lemon Yellow, Yellow Brown and Brown penwork design in Gold. 
Green, dusting with Ivory Glaze; panels, Ivory; top of bowl and 



38 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 







POPPIES— MARY LILLIAN BERRY 

Lay in poppies with Lemon Yellow, Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown and Yellow Red. The palest flowers are made of Lemon 
Yellow shaded with a little Brown Green on shadow side. The leaves are Shading Green and Apple Green. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



39 




BUTTERFLY WEED— M. A. YEICH 



PAINT the sepal or lower part of the flower with Yellow 
Brown and a little Carnation. For the petals or upper 
portion use more Carnation. The leaves and stems require 
Grey Green and a little Dark Green with Brown Green for 
retouching. Use Black for the leaves and Copenhagen Grey 
and a little Copenhagen Blue for the ground. The light spots 



in the upper wings and the body of the butterfly may be painted 
with Ivory or Yellow Ochre. For the spots in the lower wings 
use Yellow Brown and a little Carnation. Use Black for lines; 
a wash of Black for the upper wings and lighter part of body, 
and a darker tone for the lower wings and part of body in 
shadow. 



40 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 





Yellow and a little Brown Green painted, or Yellow for Dusting 
if dusted on. 

No. 5.— Paint foliage around roses with Copenhagen Blue 
and Violet and touches of Shading Green. Roses are White 
with Yellow Brown centers with Violet and Albert Yellow for 
the shading. Dark bands are Green Gold. Light band is Copen- 
hagen Blue and Violet if painted and Glaze for Blue and a touch 
of Violet if dusted on. 

No. 6.— Light flowers are Deep Blue Green and a little Tur- 
quoise or Sea Green, with touches of Banding Blue between petals. 
Dark flowers are Banding Blue and Deep Blue Green . Centers 
are Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown . Leaves, Apple Green 
and Shading Green. Dark bands are Gold. Light band is Dark 
Grey and a little Banding Blue, if painted, or Glaze for Blue and 
a little Dark Grey and Ivory Glaze, if dusted on. 

LADY SLIPPER (Page 36) 

Margaret Huntington 

OUTLINE with Black. The dark markings in lower petal 
of flowers are Rose and Blood Red for the light'and shaded 
into Blood Red and Ruby and a little Violet added for the Grey 
tone. Upper petals are White. Paint the very thinnest wash 
of Lemon Yellow over them to destroy the hard white and shade 
with Violet and a little of the Yellow. The centers are Albert 
Yellow, shaded with Yellow Brown and a little Dark Brown. 
Stems are Albert Yellow, Brown Green and a little Yellow 
Green. Leaves are Yellow Green, Albert Yellow and a little 
Brown Green or Shading Green added for the darker tones. 
Background is Dark Grey and a little Apple Green. 

STUDIO NOTES 

Alice L. Brown of Minneapolis is making a trip east as far as 
New York City for the Coover Studios, her first stop being in 
Milwaukee. Edw. F. Christian, general representative of the F. 
G. Coover Studios, will visit Eastern states. Mr. Coover also 
expects to visit Pennsylvania and New York in September. 

Miss K. B. Crandall of Chattanooga, Tenn., is attending 
The Pry Summer School at Southampton, L. I., N. Y. 



■ 



PRAIRIE ON FIRE— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 

SIX PLATE DESIGNS (Page 35) 

Adeline More 

NO. 1. — Flowers are painted with a very delicate shade of 
Rose and shaded with the same with a touch of Violet 
added for the darker shading. Centers are Albert Yellow with 
Yellow Brown stamen. Leaves are Apple Green and Shading 
Green and a little Brown Green added for the darker tones. All 
dark bands are Green Gold. 

No. 2. — Flowers are painted with the same coloring as in 
No. 1. All dark conventional lines are Green Gold. Dark grey 
bands are Dark Grey and a little Pink if painted on, or if dusted 
on use 1 part Dove Grey, 1 part Ivory Glaze. 

No. 3. — Is the same coloring as No. 1 and 2 with the grey 
band painted with Apple Green and a little Shading Green or 
dusted with 2 parts Glaze for Green and 1 part Florentine Green. 

No. 4. — Light flowers are a very thin wash of Deep Blue Green. 
Centers Yellow and Yellow Brown with dark touches of Banding 
Blue. Dark flower and buds are Banding Blue and a little Violet. 
Foliage is Shading Green and a little Copenhagen Blue. Conven- 
tional leaves and dark bands are Green Gold. The band is Albert 







& ** 





ENAMEL DESIGN FOR BOWL 

Ida Nowels Cochrane 

THREE center flowers are Sky Blue and Navajo Blue with 
Austrian Red centers. Two dots are Austrian Red. 
Flowers at sides are Coral with Cornflower Yellow centers. All 
small leaves Fruit Green and large leaves Apple Green. Buds 
are Coral. Band at top, Fruit Green and Apple Green in equal 
proportions. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, OCTOBER, 1916 




FISH PLATE— ADELINE MORE 



THE under part of fish is Albert Yellow and a little Dark 
Grey. Upper part is Violet and a little Pink, marking 
on head is Violet and a little Dark Grey. Dark tone on back 
and fins is Copenhagen Blue. Tail is Albert Yellow and Brown 
Green. Sea moss in water is Dark Brown, Dark Grey and 
Violet. The water is Copenhagen Blue and Banding Blue. 



Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown under the small fish. The 
woolly moss near center of plate is Albert Yellow and a little 
Brown Green. The remainder of moss is Copenhagen Blue. 
Background at right of plate is Albert Yellow with shading of 
Violet and Yellow and at the left is Banding Blue and shaded 
into Violet and a little Copenhagen Blue. 



42 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



TWO PLATE DESIGNS (Page 45) 

Kathryn E. Cherry 
FORGET-ME-NOT SECTION 
Tj^ORGET-me-nots are painted with Deep Blue Green and a 
A little Banding Blue with dark touches of Copenhagen Blue. 
The two prominent ones are left almost white. Centers are 
Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown. Leaves are Yellow Green 
and Shading Green. The grey band is dusted with Glaze for 
Blue. All dark lines are Green Gold. 

ROSE SECTION 
Roses are painted with a thin wash of Albert Yellow and 
shaded with the same using it heavier. Centers and buds 



are Yellow Brown. Leaves are Apple Green and Brown 
Green. Grey band is Yellow Brown and a little Dark Grey. 
All dark lines and bands are Green Gold. 

PANEL AND CIRCULAR DESIGNS (Page 43) 

Mrs. J. K. Heismann 
DANEL design to be used for vase. Entire background of 
soft Grey. Berries, Coral Red. Leaves, Grey Green. 
Outline in darker Green. 

Circular design, background of Yellow. Outer circle or 
stem and leaves Green. Berries Coral. Surface between 
background and stems Grey. All outlines in Black. 






FORGET-ME-NOT SUGAR BOWL, CUP AND SPOON TRAY— ALBERT W. HECKMAN 

Paint in the flowers in their naturalistic colors, i.e., Deep Blue Green, Banding Blue, and Violet No. 2 for flowers; Deep Blue 

Green and Peach Blossom for buds; and Yellow Green, Shading Green and Lemon Yellow for leaves. 

All the dark bands and spots are Green Gold and the background is a dusted Glaze for Green. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



43 




PANEL AND CIRCULAR DESIGNS— MRS. J. K. HEISMANN 



(Treatment page 42) 



44 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLATE— F. H. HANNEMANN 



EDGE and parallel lines to center, gold. Inner lines and dots 
black. Oil space between edge and fruit and dust in 
grey green. Fruit in enamels. Grapes purple shades. Peaches 



yellow with a little Aulich's Brown for yellow added for shading. 
Leaves in two shades of green. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



45 




TWO PLATE DESIGNS— KATHRYN E. CHERRY 



(Treatment page 42) 





\_y 



CANDLESTICKS— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 



PAINT wide band at top Yellow Brown, panels in Lemon 
Yellow and dust both with Ivory Glaze. Cones are painted 
with Yellow Brown, Yellow Red and Hair Brown. Needles 
are Yellow Green, Brown Green, Yellow Brown and Hair Brown. 
Small design over panel is done in Violet of Iron, light. Same 
colors in retouching. 



OIL with special tinting oil, pad carefully and dust with 
mixture of Royal Copenhagen Grey, 1 part, Ivory Glaze, 
1 part, Chrome Water Green, \ part. Fire. Then sketch on 
design, do shadow in Grey for Flesh, dark spray in Black and 
berries in Yellow Red and Blood Red. Top is Black. 
Second Fire — Very light. 



46 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




SNAKE GRASS 



Kate Clark Greene 



Tj^LOWERS are a Delft blue with stripes of a deeper blue 
-T through centers of petals; stamens are yellow. The back 
of flower is a paler blue; buds, stamen and leaves are Yellow 
Green shaded with Moss Green and Blue Green. 






NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



47 




PLATE, ROSE BORDER— ADELINE MORE 



ROSES are painted with the very thinnest wash of Pink or of Shading Green. Dark foliage between roses and bands are 
Rose and shaded with the same using it heavier. Leaves Green Gold. Grey bands are dusted in second fire with 1 
are Apple Green and a little Albert Yellow with darker touches Florentine Green, 2 Ivory Glaze and a little Shading Green. 



48 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




WILD FLOWER— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITMAN 

NEW ART BOOKS WORTH READING 

Anita Gray Chandler 
"Studies in the Seven Arts," by Arthur Symons. (E. 
P. Dutton Co.) Price $2.50 net. This group of papers by 
an English critic who felt "art to be life" is republished after 
a decade. Those who find in the sculptor Rodin a satisfying 
interpreter of nature will read the first study with appreciation." 
Other sculptors turn life into sculpture; he turns sculpture 
into life," Symons concisely affirms. Admirers of Whistler 
will find a sharply etched portrait of the odd old painter whose 
wit was as keen as his hand was clever. There are also studies 
of celebrities in other branches of art. Those who missed the 
papers when first published will find it profitable to read the 
new edition. 

"The Venus of Milo," by Paul Carus. (The Open Court 
Publishing Co., Chicago.) Price $1.00 net. No one knows 
who created the Venus whom everyone, the world over, knows 
at a glance. She is perhaps the best known statue extant 
yet scholars can only theorize about her history prior to the 
day a peasant of Melos exhumed her in several pieces from 
the ruins of Castro. Dr. Carus, in his study of the statue, has 
followed the cult of the goddess in the myths of many lands. 
The book is well illustrated. 



GLADIOLI (Supplement) 

Jane P. Baker 
I" IGHT tone in flowers is Rose or Pink with Albert Yellow 
-L' added for some of the shading and Violet for others. For 
the darkest petals use the color heavier and a little Blood Red 
added for the very darkest tones. Stems and light leaves are 
Apple Green and Albert Yellow for the lightest tones with Shad- 
ing Green, Brown Green and Yellow Green added for the dark 
tones. The brown tones are Yellow Brown and Brown Green 
and a little Dark Brown. Background is Violet, Yellow Brown 
and Dark Grey. 

if *•■ 
FORSYTHIA (Supplement) 

H. Fewsmith 
pLOWERS and border are painted with Albert Yellow. 
Outline is Dark Grey or Grey for Flesh and a little Black. 
Leaves and stems are Brown Green, Dark Grey and a little 
Violet. Background is Pearl Grey, a little Dark Grey or 
Grey for Flesh and a little Albert Yellow. 

STUDIO NOTE 

Mrs. Alice L. Brown of Minneapolis spent a week in Sep- 
tember teaching in the Milwaukee Art Store and the classes 
were so successful that she was asked to come back for three 
weeks in the early part of next January. 




PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 



itf 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, NOVEMBER 1916 




GAME PLATE, SNIPE— ADELINE MORE 



THE body of bird and light touches on wing are Albert 
Yellow and a little Dark Grey. The general tone on 
head, neck and the wing and tail is Brown Green and a little 
Yellow Brown, using a little more Yellow Brown in space around 
the eye. The eye, bill, feet and the dark markings on wings, 
tail and top-knot are Black and a little Brown Green. Acorns 
are Yellow Brown and a little Dark Brown and the cap, leaves 



and stems are Brown Green and Dark Grey with Dark Brown 
added for the dark touches. Background of plate is a thin 
wash of Albert Yellow and a little Dark Grey. The very 
distant hills are Violet and a little Blood Red added for those 
that are nearer. The foreground is a thin wash of Apple 
Green and a little Brown Green. Edge of plate is Dark Brown 
and Brown Green. 



50 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



PHLOX (Page 53) 

Eleanor R. Copeland 

THE blossom nearest the center is Deep Blue and a little 
Banding Blue with touches of Rose and Blood Red. 
Dark touches in centers are Blood Red. Two clusters of blos- 
soms to the left are the same colors but having the reds pre- 
dominate with touches of the blue. The lower blossoms to 
the right are Rose and a little Yellow Brown with shading of 



Rose and Violet and colors to be used very thin. Stems of 
blossoms are Apple Green, Brown Green and Yellow Brown. 
The large stems are Blood Red and Violet at the top and Brown 
Green, Yellow Brown at the bottom and Shading Green added 
for the shading. Light leaves are Apple Green, Yellow Brown 
and a little Brown Green. Dark leaves are Yellow Green, 
Brown Green and a little Shading Green. Background is Dark 
Grey and Yellow Brown. 




STEIN, PINE CONE— W. K. TITZE 



THIS is an etching design. All light spaces are etched. Use 
Cobden acid resist, thin with turpentine and cover all 
dark bands and cones. Be sure to keep edges perfect, dip 
or swab with acid. Use red bronze gold for bands and cones 
and Roman gold for etched parts, or cover the entire stein 



with red bronze gold. This will give a copper effect. 

Naturalistic spray: background, Yellow, Yellow Brown, 
Brown Green, Hair Brown. Cones, Yellow Brown shaded to 
Hair Brown. Spikes, shadow ones in Violet and Yellow Green, 
darker spikes in Brown Green and Shading Green. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



51 




CUP AND SAUCER, ROSES— MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 

PAINT roses with Rosa, leaves Lemon Yellow, Apple Green raised gold. The band on saucer is Gold also. Retouch roses 

and Dark Green. Tint band with Ivory and a little Yel- with Peach Blossom, using a touch of Yellow on left side. Other 

low Brown over some of the darkest leaves. Gold above rose colors same as first firing, 
design. The small clusters of roses and leaves and dots are 





PINE CONE MOTIFS — W. K. TITZE 



(Treatment page 50) 



52 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



SUGAR AND CREAMER (Page 54) 

Dorris Dawn Mills 

DARK bands, lines, top of handles and knob Gold. Lower 
part a very light cream. Wide band Russian Green. 
Use Rose for flowers, Albert Yellow, Apple Green, Brown Green 
and Shading Green for leaves. Tint behind flowers Cream. 
Shadows Blood Red and Deep Blue Green. 

YELLOW ROSE PLATE (Page 54) 

Lillian L. Priebe 

FIRST Fire — Use Yellow Green for prominent leaves. Yel- 
low Brown for shadows; Hair Brown for darkest touches. 
Flowers; Albert Yellow, shade with Yellow Red and Yellow 
Brown. Stems; Yellow Brown. 



Second Fire — Tint plate with Ivory, carrying Yellow 
Brown lightly over leaves. Strengthen colors if necessary. 
Accent leaves and stems with Hair Brown. 

** sr 

VASE IN PINK RAMBLER (Page 55) 

Mrs. F. C. McGaughy 
T>AINT roses with Rosa for the more shadowy ones, add a 
-f little Grey for Flowers, leaves Lemon Yellow, Yellow Green, 
Brown and Shading Green, shadow leaves Copenhagen Blue. 
Background a little Chrome Water Green or Turquoise, Yellow 
and Yellow Brown and Brown Green. Retouch roses with 
Peach Blossom and touches of Ruby, using same colors in 
background, part of which may be washed over some of the 
dark and shadow leaves. Gold above design. 




COOKY TRAY IN WHITE AND YELLOW DAISIES— MRS. F. H. HANNEMAN 



HANDLES, edge and conventional pattern in Gold. White 
daisies shaded with Brown Green or Shading Green. Yel- 
low daisies in Albert Yellow and Yellow Brown. Centers in 



Yellow Brown and Dark Brown. Leaves in Apple Green, 
Moss Green, Brown Green and Shading Green. Background 
in Ivory with darker tone in Banding Blue. 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



53 




PHLOX— ELEANOR R. COPELAND 



(Treatment page 50) 



54 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




SUGAR AND CREAMER— DORRIS DAWN MILLS 



(Treatment page 52) 




.YELLOW ROSE PLATE— LILLIAN L. PRIEBE 



(Treatment page 52) 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 



55 




VASE -IN PINK RAMBLER^MRS. F. C. McGAUGHY 



(Treatment page 52) 



56 



NATURALISTIC SECTION OF KERAMIC STUDIO 




PLANT ANALYSIS—FLORENCE WYMAN WHITSON 

SCARLET SAGE (Supplement) 

M. H. Watkeys 

OUTLINE with Dark Grey and a little Black. Pink flowers 
are painted with Pink or Rose. The light red tone is 
Yellow Red and a little Carnation. The dark red is Blood 
Red and a very little Ruby. Yellow leaves are Albert Yellow 
and a little Brown Green. For the darker leaves use Shading 
Green, a little Yellow Green and Brown Green. For brown 
stems use Dark Brown, a little Blood Red and Yellow Brown. 
Background, Apple Green and a little Dark Grey. 

WATER LILIES (Supplement) 

Treatment by Jessie M. Bard 

PAINT the background in first around the flowers. The 
water tones are Copenhagen Blue, Violet, Apple Green 
and Blood Red. Light leaves are Albert Yellow, Brown 
Green and Apple Green. Dark leaves are Shading Green, 
Copenhagen Blue, Yellow Green, Brown Green, Blood Red 
for the turned over part, Dark Brown or Auburn Brown and 
Copenhagen Blue for the brown shadows, Yellow Brown, 
Brown Green, Apple Green and Copenhagen Blue for the back- 



ground. The shading on lilies is Violet, Rose, Albert Yellow 
and Brown. Green Centers are Albert Yellow, Yellow Brown 
and a little Yellow Red. 

WATER COLOR 

Treatment by Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 
Take a sheet of Whatman's 90 lb. cold pressed smooth 
paper, dampen it and place it on wet blotting paper 
over a drawing board; when the paper is thoroughly soaked 
pass a towel over it. With a small sable draw the lilies and 
pad with Cobalt Blue. Make a dab of Indian Yellow and 
Lemon Yellow for the centre. Cover the white petals with 
a grey made of Cobalt Blue, Lemon Yellow and Rose Madder. 
Cover the whole paper with a tone, making it much darker 
near the lilies. For this wash use Indigo, Alizarin Crimson 
and Burnt Sienna. Paint in the leaves with Hooker's Green 
No. 2, Raw Sienna and Rose Madder. Now return to the 
flower, take out the lights with a bristle brush and strengthen 
the shadows; mark the stamens with Indian Yellow. Paint 
the reflections keeping them lower in tone than the original. 
Use Antwerp Blue, Raw Sienna, Black and Alizarin Crimson. 
Look over the whole, correcting mistakes. 

When dry pass quickly over the whole with a large brush 
and a little clean water to bring it together. 
Use bristle and red sable brushes. 




PLANT ANALYSIS— FLORENCE WYMAN VHITSON 



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Star Self Centering and Dividing Banding Wheel 

THE STANDARD OF VALUE AND QUALITY. 

THE BANDING AND SPACING WHEEL OF THE 
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It is probably no exaggeration to say nine out of ten 
Decorators will prefer the Star Banding Wheel to 
any other in the moderate price field. 

The Star is the ideal Banding and Spacing Wheel, mechanically correct 
of perfect design and construction. 

This is why it makes such an instantaneous appeal to all China Painters. 
WRITE FOR PRICE AND CATALOGUE. 

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■ 

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III 



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IMPORTER OF WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

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NEW YORK, N. Y. 



OUR NEW 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



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ROYAL JAPANESE SATSUMA WARE 

Will be Ready for Mailing 
February 1, 1917 



Agents for 

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MOTTOES— 30 or more good styles, $1.20 doz. 

Less your discount and many popular 
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It will pay you to take up this work. Sample book 
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IV 



KERAMIC STUDIO 




•I The Owen China Bander has become a necessary art- 
icle in all up-to-date studios, making accurate banding 
a pleasure instead of a nerve-racking process. 

<J Its simplicity of operation, ease of adjustment and 
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<JThe width of the band may be easily regulated by ad- 
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<f Decorators who are using this simple and inexpensive 
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*J If you are interested in the Owen Bander send for Free 
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B AND' 

n 

| Oil and Water Color Painting 

m _ 

AGENTS FOR JMhlf | 

M HASBURG'S AND MARSCHING'S GOLD 

THE REVELATION CHINA KILN 
THE KERAMIC STUDIO 

Ig3j Send for Catalogue, mentioning "Keramic Studio" 

H 35-37 WEST 3IST STREET, NEW YORK 



WHITE CHINA AND MATERIALS 



BUY NOW BEFORE PRICES ADVANCE 

TILES IN WOOD FRAMES for Window Boxes, Book 
Racks, Tea Tiles, etc. They may be decorated in enamels 
or colors and fired as china. See my 1917 Catalog page 15. 




ACID ETCHING— A cut from the china painter's ABC 
Paper cover, $1.00. Cloth, $1.25. 

Agent for Revelation Kilns, Coover Outlines, Keramic 
Studio, Sleeper's and Hasburg's Golds and manufac- 
turers of FILKINS BURNISH GOLD. 



MRS. C. C. FILKINS 

609 Main St., (above Chippewa) BUFFALO, N. Y. 



Smoothest, Richest 
Purest Gold Made 

P\AY after day, year after year, 
*-^ all the country over, china 
painters are trying other golds to see 
if they are as good as Hasburg's 
Phoenix Gold. They never are! 
Long comparison has confirmed 
the supremacy of Hasburg's. 

If it were only a little better, it could not have 
held its acknowledged prestige. When you 
accept an imitation you are missing a very great 
difference — in smoothness, richness and in 
perfect results. 

AT YOUR DEALERS 
AVOID SUBSTITUTES 

JOHN W. HASBURG COMPANY 

1119 North La Salle Street 

Chicago 



m?mm m^Mffi< 



g, WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

AND 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS 




BURLEY'S FAVORITE 
ROMAN GOLD 



BURLEY'S COLD COLORS 
FOR GLASS 



STEM GLASSWARE 
FOR TABLE USE 



SEE NEXT ISSUE FOR PARTICULARS 



BURLEY & COMPANY 

7 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 




[QJ 




When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



VII 




HOME STUDIO KILN 

"THE No. 12 "Keramic"— Home Studio Kiln is 
■ shown above. It will fire a few pieces very 
economically and yet will accommodate a good size 
firing. Both glass and china are fired with the same 
good results. It will give life-long service, and is 
well worthy of its name "Keramic". 

COLORADO CRUCIBLE & CLAY CO., 
16th and Clay St., Denver, Colo. 



D. M. CAMPANA ART CO. 



MONOGRAM BOOK 40c 

THE TEACHER OF OIL PAINTING 

BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF WATER COLOR 

PAINTING BOOK 50c 

THE TEACHER OF DRAWING FIG- 
URES FROM NATURE 75c 

THE TEACHER OF CONVEN- 
TIONAL DECORATING BOOK 90c 

LUSTRE BOOK 45c 

FIRING BOOK 30c 

THREE DECORATIVE DESIGN 

Books 1, 2, 3. 535 Orig. Designs....$2.10 

THE LEATHER CRAFT BOOK 40c 

FLEXIBLE RULES 18 INCH 30c 

GOLD REMOVER, NON-ACID 25c 

CAMPANA'S KILN MENDING 

MOIST CLAY, PER CAN 30c 

ONE FIRING INK, FIRES BLACK 
Per Bottle 20c 

NOTICE OUR 



Inc. 



OPEN-INE, the new water color medium 
made to keep colors open. Finest thing, 

Per Bottle 25c 

COVERED PALETTE, 8x10 57c 

FINE ROSE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

FINE GRAPE STUDY, 9x15 25c 

LIQUID ERASER, for fired colors... 45c 
CAMPANA'S DILUTING MEDIUM 

FOR OUTLINING 25c 

OPAL LUSTRE, FINEST 16c 

BEST MOTHER PEARL 20c 

STERLING ROMAN SILVER 

VERY SMOOTH, Per Box 35c 

CAMPANA'S PURITY GOLD 

THIS MONTH, PER BOX 48c 

Campana's catalog contains thousands of 
other specialties. Colors in vials and bulk. 
Golds in bulk. Moderate price goods abso- 
lutely guaranteed. 
NEW ADDRESS 



323 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



LUNN'S PRACTICAL POTTERY 

for 

ART TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

2 volumes with about one hundred illustrations 
$4.00 postpaid. 



These volumes sold separately for $2.15 each postpaid. 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



HALL'S 

SUPERIOR GOLDS 

FOR CHINA AND GLASS 
PUT UP IN SEALED BOXES OR IN GLASS JARS 



CHINA. PAINTERS PLEASE NOTE 

We don't put our Gold up in fancy boxes covered with a 
celluloid cap, etc., for all that has to be paid for by the con- 
sumer, but instead we put up in a plain sealed box a BETTER 
GOLD and guarantee to give more for the money than any 
other manufacturer in the market. 

THIS IS NO BOAST BUT AN ABSOLUTE FACT 



OUR FAMOUS UNIQUE GOLD 

IS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR GLASS DECORATION 

PUT UP IN SEALED GLASS PANS 
Single Pan, 50c. One Dozen, $4.75 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOG OF CERAMIC MATERIALS 
A valuable Book to anyone interested in China Decoration. 



ESTABLISHED 

UPWARDS 




FORTY YEARS 



FRANKLIN HALL 

1211 West Lehigh Avenue, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SUCCESSOR TO JAS. F. HALL 

DEALER IN ALL MATERIALS FOR CHINA DECORATION 



F. WEBER & CO.'S 

"SPHINX" KERAMIC GOLD 

In all shades, of finest quality, packed, celluloid covered, in dust-proof 
and air tight attractive boxes. 

BEAUTIFUL RICH GOLD COLOR AFTER FIRING 

"SPHINX" IMPROVED REMOVABLE CHINA PALETTE BOX 

9x13 at $1.25 each 
CHINA PALETTES IN VARIOUS STYLES AND SIZES 

CAMELS HAIR QUILL BRUSHES OF FINEST FRENCH MAKE 
"SYRACUSE" OUTLINING INK 

llfUITC PHINA for decorating can be had at our branch house, 
¥¥ n I I t. U 1 1 1 I1H Washin g ton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Write to them 
for catalogue. HAND BOOKS ON CHINA PAINTING 

CHINA KILNS burning Gas, Oil and Charcoal 

STUDIES — Largest assortment of Conventional and 
Naturalistic Designs 

A complete assortment of China Medallions, Metal Brooches 
and Hat Pins for decorating 

CHINA MEDALLIONS CUFF BUTTONS DRESS BUTTONS 

Dresden Porcelain Plates in all sizes and shapes 

MOUNTS FOR MEDALLIONS 

BANDING WHEELS FOR LINING CHINA 

Outfits and Materials for the new facinating 

ART OF FRENCH PEN PAINTING 

F. WEBER & CO. 

CHINA PAINTING AND ARTISTS' MATERIALS 
1125 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Branch Houses: St. Louis, Mo. and Baltimore, Md. 
New 1915 Catalogue, Vol. 400 K mailed on reaueat. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



VIII 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



The Art Institute of Chicago— 

N. H. Carpenter, Secretary and Director, pro tern. 

School of Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Illustrating, 
Designing, Normal Instruction, 

Ceramic Design and Decoration 

Send for Catalogue Department K, Chicago, 111. 

Miss Jessie M. Bard 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

Design, Jewelry, Leather Work and China Decoration 

The Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot 

HOME STUDIO 1316 ALBION AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Special designs in naturalistic conventional, semi-conventional 

and enamel work, made to your order on ohina or in water colois. 

STUDIES FOR SALE AND RENT 

SCHNEIDERS CHINA AND LEATHER COLORS 
FOR SALE 

Telephone Rogers Park 6185 



Mrs. K. E. Cherry 

DESIGNS TO ORDER 

MARINA BUILDING, STUDIO 1, 2, 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Jessie Louise Clapp 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

IN THE USE OF "COOVER'S OUTLINE DESIGNS" AND 
K. E. CHERRY'S COLORS AND ENAMELS, ETC. 



Sphin 



Gold, Roman-Unfluxed, White, Gn 
67 oents per box post-paid. 



516 McCarthy Building, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Miss Mabel C. Dibble 

STUDIO— 806 Marshall Field Building 

110 N. Wabash Avenue, Chicago. 

Teacher of Conventional Enamel Work on Porcelain 

Water color designs. for rent. Catalogue. 

Send for price list of my enamels. Full size vials. 

Prepared and bottled in my studio. 

Enamels sold as mine at 10c, small vial, are imitation! 

Booklet on Enamel Work 50c. 



Edna Louise Einbigler 

600 WEST 113 STREET, NEW YORK. 

Instructor in China Decoration, Conven- 
tional and Naturalistic, Enamels. 

Telephone Morningside 7686. 



Jetta Ehlers 

STUDIO 18 EAST KINNEY ST., NEWARK, N. J. 

PORCELAIN DECORATION AND DESIGN 
PLANS FOR TABLE LINENS 

Linens and materials for working purchased on commission. 

Miss Gertrude Estabrooks 

Water Color Pictures to Rent — Heads, Flowers, Land- 
scapes and Fruit. Send for Catalogue. 
Book on Methods and Colors, in Water Colors. Price $1. 
Lessons in Water Color, Oil and Tapestry. 
1103 Auditorium Tower, Chicago., 111. 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee 

STUDIO 919 FINE ARTS BUILDING 
410 Michigan Boulevard, South, Chicago 

Teacher of Conventional Design and Enamel Work on Porcelain 

Send for my Tested, Hard and Satsuma Enamel. 

Original Designs for Conventional Work made to Order. 

Importer of Royal Satsuma for Decorating. 

THIS SPACE together with name and address 

in "The Directory" $3.00 Per Month 

A YEAR'S CONTRACT CARRIES WITH IT A YEAR'S 

SUBSCRIPTION TO THIS MAGAZINE. 

Send for yearly contract rates 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



Teachers' Directory 

Alabama 

ENSLEY 

Mis. J. H. Tetlow, 2013J Avenue "E" 

California 

LOS ANGELES 

Chapman-Bailey Studio, 416-417 Blan- 
chard Building, 233 S. Broadway 

District of Columbia 

WASHINGTON 

Sherratt Art Studio, 608 13th St. N. W. 

Georgia 
ATLANTA 

Miss Jeannette Williams, 375 Piedmont 
Avenue. 

Illinois 

CHICAGO 

D. M. Campana Art School, 323-325 S. 
Wabash Ave. 

Misa Mabel C. Dibble, Studio 806 Mar- 
shall Field Buildina. 

Mrs. A. A. Frazee, 918 Fine Arts Bldg., 
410 Michigan Boulevard, So. 

Blanche Van Court Boudinot, 5315 
Eenmore Avenue. 

Gertrude Estabrooks, 1103 Auditorium 
Tower. 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Dept. K. 

Marguerite Mills Yeoman, 1101 Audi- 

OAK PARK 

Prof. Franz J. Schwarz, 126 So. Ridge- 
land Avenue. 

Iowa 

DAVENPORT 

Miss Edith Alma Ross. 312 E. 14th St. 
DES MOINES 

Miss Frances Blanchard, No. 3 Flor- 
entine Building, 7th and Locust St. 

Louisana 

SHREVEPORT 

Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant, 1165 L< 



KANSAS CITY 

Saffelle School of China Painting, 2S05 
Park Avenue 

Minnesota 

ST. PAUL 

Henrietta Barclay Paist, 2298 Corn- 



New Jersey 

NEWARK 

Mrs. F. N. Waterfield, 149 Washington 

Street 
Miss Charlotte Kroll, 149 Washington 

Street. 

New York 

BUFFALO 

Mrs. C. C. Filkins, 609 Main Street. 

NEW YORK 

Edna Louise Einbigler, 600 West 113 

Street. 
Mrs. Ada Murray Travis, Florentine 

Court, 166 West 129th St., cor. 7th 

Ave. 
Miss M. M. Mason, 218 West 59th St. 
Rhoda Holmes Nicholls, 39 W. 67th St 
Mrs. Carrie L. Gwatkiu, 3905 Broadway 
Mrs. L. Vance-Phillips, 13 Central Park 

West 
Lillie M. Weaver, 159 W. 125th St., 

(cor. 7th Ave.) 

SYRACUSE 

Miss Jessie Louise Clapp 

McCarthy Block, corner South 
Salina and Onondaga Streets. 



Ohio 

COLUMBUS 

Misa Mint M. Hood. 1092 E. Rich St. 
CINCINNATI 

Miss Louise Seinecke. 2143 Vine St. 



Pennsylrania 

PHILADELPHIA 
A. B. Cobden 

Tennessee 

CHATTANOOGA 

Mrs. B. B. Crsndall, 220 E. Terrace. 



Wisconsin 

MILWAUKEE 

Anna E. Pierce and Adele P. Chase, 
194 11th St. 



Mrs. F. N. Waterfield 
Miss Charlotte Kroll 

DOMESTIC ART ROOMS, 149 Washington St., Newark, N. J. 

Importers and Dealers in China for Decorating 

PAINTS, MEDIUMS. ETC. CHINA FIRED DAILY 

Agents for Perfection Kilns 

Send for our "Rose," stands repeated firings, 25c per vial 

Miss M. M. Mason 

218 West 59th St., New York 

THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN— with studio 
for teachers, craftsmen and t' ' 

CERAMICS— the 

— modeling i 
forms. 
Catalogue of designs upon request 



e of colors, enamels and lustres, 
clay — the building of pottery 



Rhoda Holmes Nicholls 

CLASSES IN WATER COLORS AND OILS 
Colonial Studios, jp W. 67th St., New York City 
Henrietta Barclay Paist 

A Non-resident Course of Design for the China Decorator. 

Simple and practical. 

This course was the outcome of a demand for help in this direction 

and has been in practice since 1910. 

The advantages are obvious. You can put yourself 

in the Creative Class. Write for particulars. 

Special arrangements for Ciubs or groups of four or more. 

2298 Commonwealth Avenue, ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Emily F. Peacock 

104 South Street, Freehold, N. J. 

DEALER IN UNUSUAL ANTIQUES 



Miss Edith Alma Ross 

New Studies in Water Color for Bent 

New designs for china decoration, naturalistic and convention 

New water color studies for landscape and flower painting. 

New designs for china arranged in sets. 

Studies sent on approval upon receipt of reference. 

For price-list Address 312 E. Fourteenth St., Davenport, low 

Special designs made to order. 



J. Blair Suffolk 

Classes In the modern decoration of porcelain and glass. 

The Old Persian method of decorating porcelain over the glaze. 

Enamels, Colors, Lustres, Metals, Water Color, 
Japanese Wood Blocks. 



9 West 64h St., New York 



93 Rue de Vaugirard, Paris 



Mrs. Anna C. Tarrant 

1165 Louisiana Avenue, SHREVEPORT, LA. 

TEACHER OF CHINA DECORATION 

Specializing in Enamels and Lustre. Large assortment of Belleek, 

Satsuma, French and German China for decorating. 

O'Hara's Enamels, Fry's Colors, Hasburg's Gold. 

China Fired Daily. Orders Promptly Filled. 



ngside 



Mrs. Ada Murray Travis ™. 

Studio Florentine Court 166 West U9thSt., New York City 

TO OUT OF TOWN TEACHERS 

I have one of the largest collections of New and Original 
Designs for Enamel in Water Colors either for sale or rent. 

Designs sent an approval. 
Also have large assortment of Conventional and Naturalistic. 



Lillie M. Weaver 

STUDIO, 159 W. 125th St., (cor. 7th Ave.) 
NEW YORK CITY 

China Decoration Naturalistic and Conventional 
EXPERT FIRING DAILY 
Especial Attention to Enamels 
Telephone 5885 Morningside. 



H. Foerster 

1554 North 13 St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ACIDING CHINA WITHOUT DIPPING, 

backs and insides need not to be covered with resist, my 
own process, taught at reasonable prices. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



IX 



St. Louis School of Fine Arts 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

POTTERY, CERAMIC DECORATION 

AND INSTRUCTION IN ALL BRANCHES OF THE ARTS 
LINDELL BOULEVARD AND SK1NKER ROAD 

For Full Information and Free Illustrated Catalogue 
Apply to E. H. WUERPEL, DIRECTOR 

Inquiries and orders from ail parts of the world 
are coming for the new book 

"Design and the Decoration of Porcelain." 

By HENRIETTA BARCLAY PAIST. 

recently published by this Company ! 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

POST-PAID. 

Teachers and students of design seeking after original ideas! 
This book will interest you. 

SEND FOR PROSPECTUS 1 

The above with paper binding mailed with one year's 
subscription to Keramic Studio for .$5.00 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



TEACHERS! 

Club Rates for United States 

only 

UNTIL MARCH 31ST. 

Club of Ten Members 
For $35.00 

Your premium, a year's subscription and 
one of our Class Room Books, worth $7.00. 

Club of Five Members 
for $18.25 

Earn your own subscription for one 
year by sending us Five Yearly Subscrip- 
tions at the club price, $3.65 each. 

Work for us and yourselves] 



SUMMER TERM 



University of Pittsburgh 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



W. G. CHAMBERS 

Dean of School of Education 



H. R. KNIFFIN 
Prof. Fine and Industrial Arts 



SPECIAL NOTICE ! 

On account of advance in labor and 
materials All Club Rates and Pre- 
mium Offers will be withdrawn on 
March 31st. 

Keramic Studio Publishing Co., 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



Specialization in the Fine Arts, Industrial 

Arts and Crafts 
Standard Courses in all Other Departments 

Bulletin on Application to Registrar 

THE BOOK OF CUPS AND SAUCERS 

Price $1.50 
will be mailed to any regular active subscriber 

for $1.00 postpaid. 
The combination price for this book and subscrip- 
tion is $5.00 ! 

LITTLE THINGS TO MAKE 

Price $2.50 
will be mailed to any regular active subscriber 
for $1.75 postpaid. 
The combination price for this book and subscrip- 
tion is $5.75 ! 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



GLASS DECORATING 

A Special Correspondence Course to Teachers for $ 5.00 

By MISS LOUISE SEINECKE 

2143 VINE STREET CINCINNATI, OHIO 
Miss Seinecke has studied at a Bohemian Art Glass Studio 
in Dresden, Saxony and she has many ideas which will be of 
direct benefit to the teacher. Great interest is now being man- 
ifested in Glass Decoration, not only for its own sake but be- 
cause of the shortage of white china. 



A. B. Cobden's Ceramic Art School 

COBDEN'S SPECIAL CERAMIC COLORS in Powder 

COBDEN'S PURE ROMAN GOLD First Quality Only 

MEDIUMS, BRUSHES AND ALL MATERIALS 

FOR CHINA DECORATING 
SOLE AGENT FOR PERFECTION KILNS 

13 South Sixteenth Street PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Special Agent for Keramic Studio Publications 



WHITE CHINA FOR DECORATING 

Open Stock Dinner Sets, Haviland & Co. Derby, Plain, Ranson and 
Star Shapes. 

J. P. FRENCH CHINA DINNER SETS 

Ideal and Flora Shapes. 

No Catalogue 

Prices net ! No discount ! 

Write us your wants, large selection French and German China. 

JOHN G. YERGAN, - - PITTSBURGH, PA. 

420 Sixth Avenue, Opposite Nixon Theatre. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

SHERRATT'S ROMAN GOLD 

ROMAN, UNFLUX, GREEN and RED GOLD, $1.00 per box. SILVER 
50 cents per box. Dealers and Teachers rates on application. This Gold is 
Superior in Quality and Quantity. Once used always used. Hand Painted China 
a Specialty. Lessons in China Painting. White China for Decorating and 
household use. All kinds of China Art Materials. Oiders promptly filled. 
AGENT FOR REVELATION CHINA KILNS. 

SHERRATT'S CHINA ART STORE 

698 13TH STREET. N. W.. WASHINGTON. P. C. 



COOLEY'S GOLDS! 

NONE BETTER! 

FINEST OILS, COLORS AND LUSTRES. 

Whatever you need for Decorating we have it. 
BOSTON CHINA DECORATING WORKS, 

ESTABLISHED 1860 

38 Tennyson Street, BOSTON, MASS. 



HOW TO PAINT AND FIRE GLASS 

ALL THE RAGE NOW 

Send .11.00 for full instructions based on years of experience. 

SAFFELLE SCHOOL OF CHINA PAINTING, 

2805 Park Avenue Kansas City, Mo. 



Copy for advertisements for April number should be in by 

MARCH 1st. 

Keramic, Studio Publishing Co. 




DRAWING INKS 
ETERNAL WRITING INK 
ENGROSSING INK 
ITAURINE MUCILAGE 
PHOTO MOUNTER 
DRAWING BOARD PAS- 
LIQUID PASTE 
OFFICE PASTE 
.VEGETABLE GLUE 
Are the Finest and Best InKs and Adhesives. 
Emancipate yourself from the use of corrosive and ill-smelling inks I 
• : — i, and adopt the Higgins Inka and Adhesives. They " 



HIGG1NS' 



.nd 



i, they are so sweet, clean, well put up, withal so efficient. 
At Dealers Generally 

Chas. M. Hideins & Co., Mfrs., 271 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



When writing to advertisers please mention this magazine 



KERAMIC STUDIO 



THE REVELATION KILNS 



H. J. CAULKINS 




Especially well adapted for Glass Firing m. c. perry 

If china decorators would do their own firing with a 
Revelation Kiln, then figure what they had saved, the 
results would be another revelation. 



The most perfect device for public or private 
studio use, as good chimney connection is all that 
is required for perfect operation. The fuel, kerosene 
oil, is easily obtained in all places. 





Being of tubular construction, so 
that a series of little firebrick flues form 
the wall of the oven, there is no chance 
for warping and going out of shape, as 
in the case of a flat brick wall. 




No plumbing, no gas 
bills, no flying back in the 
mixer, no escaping of un- 
healthful or disagreeable 
fumes into the room. 



This is our new No. 3 round kiln. 

The removable tubes by the door constitute 
the essential advantage of this kiln, as they make 
a complete circle of flame about the oven. They 
may be used or not, at the will of the firer, but 
are especially desirable when an even, strong heat 
is necessary for certain classes of work. 

Our Pottery Kilns are built on 
the same plan, with heavier construc- 
tion and Crane Hinge Doors. We 
have a small combination kiln for 
studio and craft work as well as 
school work, which cannot be surpassed 
We also make larger kilns, 
which will fire to any heat 
required for developing 
clay bodies or porcelain 
glazes. For the first time 
in the history of ceramics 
these kilns have made it 

possible for 
the ama- 
teur to de- 
velop the 
highest 
grade of 
profession - 
al pottery. 




The radiation of 
heat into the interior 
is almost without loss, 
since the fire-brick 
forming the tubes is 
very^thin. On the other hand, the 
fire-brick and heavy non-conduct- 
ing wall on the outside prevents 
the radiation of heat into the room 
so that the kiln can be fired with 
comfort. 

No. 6 (see below) — This is the most popular 

size for general studio use. No. 7 is for profes- 
sional These kilns may be 
and jBjj|i arranged with a series 
factory /-— A of shelves to accommo- 
firing. " Si ffi jMf_f' date flat glass. 








We also construct to order 
all sizes and shapes of kilns 
for all purposes requiring heat 
in manufacturing, for melt- 
ing, enameling, fusing, test- 
ing, etc., both in the open 
flame and closed oven. 




Send for one of our catalogues containing 
testimonials of the foremost decorators in 
this and other countries who make exclusive 
use of Revelation Kilns. 

If you want to know about the Reve- 
lation Kiln ASK THOSE WHO USE THEM 




H. J. CAULKINS & GO. 

Manufacturers of China Kilns, Pottery Kilns, Enamel Furnaces, Dental, and other high heat furnaces 
Smith Building, State and Griswold Streets, DETROIT, MICH. 



REVISED BARGAIN LIST 

AT 75 CENTS PER DOZEN 

We offer until further notice the following studies with treatments all illustrated in Catalog "F" 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Elder Blossoms — Marshal Fry 20 

Wild Carrots— M. M. Mason ± 21 

Peacock Study— P. H. Rhead 23 

Some Color Schemes and their Application— Hugo Froehlich.. 24 

Scarlet Bean — Leta Horlocker 26 

Birds for Tile Decoration— Edith Alma Ross 26 

Poppies— T. McLennan 27 

Thistles— Mary A. Neal 28 

Poppies— M. M. Mason 29 

Apples — M. M. Mason 29 

Oranges— M. M. Mason 31 

Iris— Laura Overly 33 

Phlox— Paul Putzki 33 

Plums — T. McLennan Hinman 34 

Marigolds — Laura B. Overly 35 

Zinnias — Mary Overbeck 36 

Orchids— P. Putzki 37 

Poppy and Hawthorn Blossoms — H. B. Paist 38 

Cyclamen— P. Putzki 39 



Catalogue F 
PAGE 

Sweet Peas— T. McLennan-Hinman 42 

Asters— T. McLennan-Hinman 43 

Anemone — A. Alsop-Robineau 44 

Mirror— Helen S. ¥/illiams 45 

Calla Lily— O. Foley 46 

Jack in the Pulpit — N. Beyer 46 

Hydrangea — M. M. Mason 47 

Texas Wild Flowers — A. Donaldson 47 

Hollyhocks— P. Putzki 48 

Narcissus— T. McLennan-Hinman 50 

Cotton — A. Donaldson 51 

Rose Panels— Mrs. H. B. Baker 52 

Petunias — Paul Putzki 53 

Passion Flower — Alice W. Donaldson 53 

Freesia — E. E. Daniels 54 

Azalea — Margaret D. Lindale 54 

Flowering Almond — E. E. Daniels 55 

Apple Blossoms — Alice W. Donaldson 55 

Larkspur — Edna S. Cave 56 



These will be sold postpaid at 75 cts. a dozen with treatments, until further notice. No order taken for less than one dozen. 
Choose your own assortment — The whole list sent free for two yearly subscriptions, one of which must be new. 
THIS PREMIUM OFFER GOOD UNTIL APRIL 30, 1917. 

KERAMIG STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



THE POTTER 

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO 
THOSE INTERESTED IN CERAMICS. 



Edited by FREDERICK HTJRTEN RHEAD. 

Published by THE POTTER PUBLISHING CO., 

Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, California 

SUBSCRIPTION $3.00 a year. 



The COMPLETE SETS of 

The Sixteen Numbers of 

PALETTE and BENCH 

Are gone, but we have SETS of 15 at $3.00 

Every number except October, 1909. 
g^POSTPAID TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUBLISHING CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



THESE BOOKS SENT POST-PAID 
ON RECEIPT OF PRICE 

Mrs. Filkin's A. B. C. for Beginners in China Painting $1.00 

How to apply Enamels by Mabel C. Dibble 60 

Book on Methods for painting in Water Color by Gertrude Estabrook 1.00 

Colors and Coloring in China Painting Keramic Supply Co 26 

Lunn's Practical Pottery, 2 vols, (or vols, sold singly $2.15 each) 4.00 

The Teacher of China Painting by D. M. Campana _ 79 

Firing China and Glass by Campana „ ». 37 

Book of Monograms by Campana 43 

Flat Enamel Decoration in China by Mrs. L. T. Steward 1.00 

Home Furnishing by Alice M. Kellogg (Pub. at 1.50) 75 

The Human Figure by Vanderpool 2.00 

Marks of American Potters by E. A. Barber 2.25 

American Glassware, Old and New [ 1,00 

Grand Feu Ceramics 500 

The Fruit Book 3.00 

The Rose Book 300 

The Art of Teaching China Decoration, Class Room No. 1 3.00 

Flower Painting on Porcelain, CJase Room No. 2 3.00 

Figure Painting on Porcelain and Firing, Class Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, Class Room No. 4.. 3.00 

Book of Cups and Saucers 1 50 

Book of Little Things to Make 2.50 

Keramic Decorations Nellie F. Mcintosh 1.00 

Eberlein & McClure's "Practical Book of Early American Arts and 

Crafts," post paid, net g qq 

"Handicrafts for the Handicapped" by Herbert J. Hall and Mertiec M. 

C. Buck, post paid 135 

Pottery for Artists, Craftsmen and Teachers by Geo. J. Cox, I.35 

A NEW BOOK 

Design and the Decoration of Porcelain, by Henrietta Barclay Paist 

Paper Cover $1.50 Cloth Cover $2.50 

KERAMIC STUDIO PUB. CO. 



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Flower Painting on Pdrcelain, Class Roomj^k 2 3.00 

Figure Painting oh Porcelain and Firing, Class 

Room No. 3 3.00 

Conventional Decoration of Pottery and Porcelain, 

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Book of Cups and Saucers and year's subscription 

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12 Nos. Palette & Bench Oct. '08 to Sept. *09 

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Design and The Decoration of Porcelain 

By Henrietta Barclay Paist 

from her articles published in "Keramic Studio" 

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